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Machado In this episode of PT Pintcast, Jimmy talks to M. Terry Loghmani, PT PhD, MTC, CMT, about the exciting world of regenerative medicine. She discusses her emerging research and the role of physical therapy in this field while enjoying a Sun King Wee Mac Scottish Ale, and Jimmy enjoys a Davidson Brothers Scotch Ale.

Terry is an Associate Professor in the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences (SHRS) Department of Physical Therapy at Indiana University, with certifications in orthopedic manual therapy and massage therapy. She was one of the first to work with the Graston Technique of instrument-assisted soft tissue manipulation (IASTM), for which she was the primary author on the training manual, and has over 20 years of experience with training and clinical practice in this approach. Recently, Terry was named Director of the SHRS Applied Regenerative Medicine Lab for her efforts in the emerging field of regenerative medicine. Propelled by repeated success using IASTM, she began to focus on research to discover the “why” behind the benefits, studying the role of manual therapy with regards to regenerative rehabilitation.

Highlights include:

  • Not just what, but WHY? The findings of her pilot studies on soft tissue manipulation in healthy rodents and young men that identified immediate changes in stem cell circulation
  • Feeling good and doing good, too! The implications these findings on the “method behind the madness” have for regenerative and rehabilitative affects
  • Natural, non-invasive, non-pharmaceutical; the unique position PTs have in regenerative rehabilitation
  • The future is now, embrace it or be left behind – why riding the new wave of regenerative medicine and becoming involved in the research is CRITICAL for the profession
  • Forever young? Do we have the power to prevent degenerative disease?