PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy https://www.ptpintcast.com/listen/pt-pintcast-podcast-library-recorded-over-a-beer/ The best conversations happen at happy hour, welcome to ours! Conversations about Physical Therapy over a beer. Mon, 18 Nov 2019 17:47:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.4 A Physical Therapy radio show. <br /> <br /> Hosted by former Rock Radio DJ turned Physical Therapist, Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT.<br /> <br /> We talk to Physical Therapists from around the world, over a pint of beer. <br /> <br /> The BEST conversations happen at happy hour, welcome to ours. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT Jimmy@PTPintcast.com Jimmy@PTPintcast.com (Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT) PT Pintcast LLC We talk Physical Therapy, Drink Beer & Record it PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy http://ptpintcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/PTPintcastFeedLogo-compressor.jpg https://www.ptpintcast.com/listen/pt-pintcast-podcast-library-recorded-over-a-beer/ TV-MA New York, NY Weekly Physical Therapy and the Special Olympics with Suzanne O’Neal https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/11/18/physical-therapy-and-the-special-olympics-with-suzanne-oneal/ Mon, 18 Nov 2019 17:47:41 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5997 We talked with Physical Therapist Suzanne O'Neal. Suzanne is an assistant professor in the DPT program at Midwestern University and a neuro nerd and huge proponent of community service. She's also a Clinical Director for Special Olympics Arizona. In that role, she help's to coordinate free PT screenings for Special Olympic athletes at various state games. We covered: Why is community service so important? And why is it important to start fostering this belief in PT education?  What are the Special Olympics FUNfitness PT screenings?Who is involved in the screenings?  How did she get involved in Special Olympics?How can YOU get involved? We talked with Physical Therapist Suzanne O’Neal. Suzanne is an assistant professor in the DPT program at Midwestern University and a neuro nerd and huge proponent of community service.

She’s also a Clinical Director for Special Olympics Arizona.

In that role, she help’s to coordinate free PT screenings for Special Olympic athletes at various state games.

We covered:

Why is community service so important? And why is it important to start fostering this belief in PT education?  

What are the Special Olympics FUNfitness PT screenings?

Who is involved in the screenings?  

How did she get involved in Special Olympics?

How can YOU get involved?

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Physical Therapy and the Special Olympics with Suzanne O'Neal We talked with Physical Therapist Suzanne O'Neal. Suzanne is an assistant professor in the DPT program at Midwestern University and a neuro nerd and huge proponent of community service.



She's also a Clinical Director for Special Olympics Arizona.



In that role, she help's to coordinate free PT screenings for Special Olympic athletes at various state games.



We covered:



Why is community service so important? And why is it important to start fostering this belief in PT education?  What are the Special Olympics FUNfitness PT screenings?Who is involved in the screenings?  How did she get involved in Special Olympics?How can YOU get involved?
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 20:34
Inside the life of an NBA Physical Therapist with Matt Tuttle https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/11/11/inside-the-life-of-an-nba-physical-therapist-with-matt-tuttle/ Mon, 11 Nov 2019 18:28:51 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5994 We got to talk to Matt Tuttle one of the Physical Therapists for the Denver Nuggets. Topics we hit on were: Pain Science EducationSleepWearablesLoad ManagementBlood Flow Restriction Training And Matt referred to an episode of the BJSM podcast, here's that link: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/you-cant-use-bad-data-to-guide-training-decisions-load/id330966919?i=1000448807259 We mentioned a great video Matt was featured in on Pain Science take a look at that here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DeIkkD-UlsE Sponsors of the show: Aureus Medical Staffing - OwensRecoveryScience.com - NUStep.com  RockTape.com  - We got to talk to Matt Tuttle one of the Physical Therapists for the Denver Nuggets. Topics we hit on were:

Pain Science Education
Sleep
Wearables
Load Management
Blood Flow Restriction Training

And Matt referred to an episode of the BJSM podcast, here’s that link: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/you-cant-use-bad-data-to-guide-training-decisions-load/id330966919?i=1000448807259

We mentioned a great video Matt was featured in on Pain Science take a look at that here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DeIkkD-UlsE

Sponsors of the show:

Aureus Medical Staffing –

OwensRecoveryScience.com

NUStep.com 

RockTape.com  –

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Inside the life of an NBA Physical Therapist with Matt Tuttle We got to talk to Matt Tuttle one of the Physical Therapists for the Denver Nuggets. Topics we hit on were:



Pain Science EducationSleepWearablesLoad ManagementBlood Flow Restriction Training



And Matt referred to an episode of the BJSM podcast, here's that link: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/you-cant-use-bad-data-to-guide-training-decisions-load/id330966919?i=1000448807259



We mentioned a great video Matt was featured in on Pain Science take a look at that here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DeIkkD-UlsE



Sponsors of the show:



Aureus Medical Staffing -



OwensRecoveryScience.com -



NUStep.com 



RockTape.com  -
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 41:34
How I Built This with PT Pintcast Creator Jimmy McKay https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/11/08/how-i-built-this-with-pt-pintcast-creator-jimmy-mckay/ Fri, 08 Nov 2019 10:00:51 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5978 The 3rd part in a 3 part series recorded live at APTA's National Student Conclave we talk to... me. I mean, PT Pintcast creator Jimmy McKay. How did a rock radio DJ become a Physical Therapist who then became a Physical Therapy podcaster? Take a listen to find out. The 3rd part in a 3 part series recorded live at APTA’s National Student Conclave we talk to… me. I mean, PT Pintcast creator Jimmy McKay.

How did a rock radio DJ become a Physical Therapist who then became a Physical Therapy podcaster? Take a listen to find out.

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How I Built This with PT Pintcast Creator Jimmy McKay The 3rd part in a 3 part series recorded live at APTA's National Student Conclave we talk to... me. I mean, PT Pintcast creator Jimmy McKay.



How did a rock radio DJ become a Physical Therapist who then became a Physical Therapy podcaster? Take a listen to find out.
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 23:44
#TBT Scott Chesney – Motivation, Perspective and Anything is Possible https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/11/07/tbt-scott-chesney-motivation-perspective-and-anything-is-possible/ Thu, 07 Nov 2019 10:00:21 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5965 ThrowBackThursday we go back to 2016's National Student Conclave in Miami Florida where the keynote speaker was Scott Chesney.  Scott tells his amazing story, the theme of his keynote address that anything is possible.  He shares insight & words to live by, and the game changing wheels on his chair. Scott's Bio: Scott Chesney, a two-time world traveler and a navigator of life with paralysis for over two decades, has presented to over one million people in 38 countries. After awakening to paralysis at the age of 15 from a sudden spinal stroke, Scott has amassed a resume of transformational experiences, powerful insights, and inspiring stories that cut to the core of the human spirit. He has become a nationally and internationally recognized workshop and keynote presenter, and his positive and inspiring messages have changed countless lives. His insights have been coveted and applauded by Fortune 500 corporations, hospitals/rehab centers, associations, sports' teams, audiences at The United Nations, The Pentagon and the FBI, colleges and universities, and K-12 schools. Realizing that his audience members wanted more personal guidance after his presentations, Scott became a professional Life Coach in which he combines transformational techniques and strategies that he learned from his world travels and continues to practice himself today to help people create personalized blueprints for navigating life happily and successfully. As a person who skydives, walks on hot coals on his hands, para-sails, and continues to engage in many other adventures around the world, Scott prides himself of living life to its fullest and encourages and trains audiences and clients to do the same. In addition to keeping a busy speaking and coaching schedule, Scott became President of Raise Hope Foundation in ©2014 that trains, mentors, and places people with disabilities and veterans for competitive careers in financial services. He is also an Ambassador for the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation, an Ambassador for Kessler Foundation, a member of the Seton Hall University Leadership Advisory Council, a member of the Board of Trustees for The Knowles Foundation and a member of the National Speakers Association (NSA). He has also served on the Board of Trustees for Children's Specialized Hospital. Scott graduated from Seton Hall University in 1992 with a B.A. degree in Communications. Scott is married, has two children, and resides in New Jersey. PT Pintcast is proudly poured by Aureus Medical Therapy Team. Travel & direct hire opportunities nationwide. ThrowBackThursday we go back to 2016’s National Student Conclave in Miami Florida where the keynote speaker was Scott Chesney.  Scott tells his amazing story, the theme of his keynote address that anything is possible.  He shares insight & words to live by, and the game changing wheels on his chair.

Scott’s Bio:

Scott Chesney, a two-time world traveler and a navigator of life with paralysis for over two decades, has presented to over one million people in 38 countries.

After awakening to paralysis at the age of 15 from a sudden spinal stroke, Scott has amassed a resume of transformational experiences, powerful insights, and inspiring stories that cut to the core of the human spirit. He has become a nationally and internationally recognized workshop and keynote presenter, and his positive and inspiring messages have changed countless lives. His insights have been coveted and applauded by Fortune 500 corporations, hospitals/rehab centers, associations, sports’ teams, audiences at The United Nations, The Pentagon and the FBI, colleges and universities, and K-12 schools.

Realizing that his audience members wanted more personal guidance after his presentations, Scott became a professional Life Coach in which he combines transformational techniques and strategies that he learned from his world travels and continues to practice himself today to help people create personalized blueprints for navigating life happily and successfully. As a person who skydives, walks on hot coals on his hands, para-sails, and continues to engage in many other adventures around the world, Scott prides himself of living life to its fullest and encourages and trains audiences and clients to do the same.

In addition to keeping a busy speaking and coaching schedule, Scott became President of Raise Hope Foundation in ©2014 that trains, mentors, and places people with disabilities and veterans for competitive careers in financial services. He is also an Ambassador for the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation, an Ambassador for Kessler Foundation, a member of the Seton Hall University Leadership Advisory Council, a member of the Board of Trustees for The Knowles Foundation and a member of the National Speakers Association (NSA). He has also served on the Board of Trustees for Children’s Specialized Hospital. Scott graduated from Seton Hall University in 1992 with a B.A. degree in Communications.

Scott is married, has two children, and resides in New Jersey.

PT Pintcast is proudly poured by Aureus Medical Therapy Team. Travel & direct hire opportunities nationwide.

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ThrowBackThursday we go back to 2016's National Student Conclave in Miami Florida where the keynote speaker was Scott Chesney.  Scott tells his amazing story, the theme of his keynote address that anything is possible. ThrowBackThursday we go back to 2016's National Student Conclave in Miami Florida where the keynote speaker was Scott Chesney.  Scott tells his amazing story, the theme of his keynote address that anything is possible.  He shares insight & words to live by, and the game changing wheels on his chair.



Scott's Bio:



Scott Chesney, a two-time world traveler and a navigator of life with paralysis for over two decades, has presented to over one million people in 38 countries.



After awakening to paralysis at the age of 15 from a sudden spinal stroke, Scott has amassed a resume of transformational experiences, powerful insights, and inspiring stories that cut to the core of the human spirit. He has become a nationally and internationally recognized workshop and keynote presenter, and his positive and inspiring messages have changed countless lives. His insights have been coveted and applauded by Fortune 500 corporations, hospitals/rehab centers, associations, sports' teams, audiences at The United Nations, The Pentagon and the FBI, colleges and universities, and K-12 schools.



Realizing that his audience members wanted more personal guidance after his presentations, Scott became a professional Life Coach in which he combines transformational techniques and strategies that he learned from his world travels and continues to practice himself today to help people create personalized blueprints for navigating life happily and successfully. As a person who skydives, walks on hot coals on his hands, para-sails, and continues to engage in many other adventures around the world, Scott prides himself of living life to its fullest and encourages and trains audiences and clients to do the same.



In addition to keeping a busy speaking and coaching schedule, Scott became President of Raise Hope Foundation in ©2014 that trains, mentors, and places people with disabilities and veterans for competitive careers in financial services. He is also an Ambassador for the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation, an Ambassador for Kessler Foundation, a member of the Seton Hall University Leadership Advisory Council, a member of the Board of Trustees for The Knowles Foundation and a member of the National Speakers Association (NSA). He has also served on the Board of Trustees for Children's Specialized Hospital. Scott graduated from Seton Hall University in 1992 with a B.A. degree in Communications.



Scott is married, has two children, and resides in New Jersey.



PT Pintcast is proudly poured by Aureus Medical Therapy Team. Travel & direct hire opportunities nationwide.
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 22:35
UPDATE: Physical Therapy faces an 8% payment cut from CMS with Ali Schoos & Theresa Marko https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/11/06/update-physical-therapy-faces-an-8-payment-cut-from-cms-with-ali-schoos-theresa-marko/ Wed, 06 Nov 2019 20:55:35 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5979 CMS has released a ruling that will reduce payment to Physical Therapists by 8% in the coming year. We take stock on what this means now and in the future and what WE can do about it as a profession. CMS has released a ruling that will reduce payment to Physical Therapists by 8% in the coming year.

We take stock on what this means now and in the future and what WE can do about it as a profession.

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UPDATE: Physical Therapy faces an 8% payment cut from CMS with Ali Schoos & Theresa Marko CMS has released a ruling that will reduce payment to Physical Therapists by 8% in the coming year.



We take stock on what this means now and in the future and what WE can do about it as a profession.
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 8:42
How He Built this with Josh D’Angelo of PT Day of Service https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/11/06/how-he-built-this-with-josh-dangelo-of-pt-day-of-service/ Wed, 06 Nov 2019 10:00:27 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5976 From APTA's National Student Conclave we talk with Josh D'Angelo about the things he's created in his PT career. Notably, PT Day of Service, Move Together and Movement X. How did Josh go from an idea, to a full on worldwide movement... again and again? From APTA’s National Student Conclave we talk with Josh D’Angelo about the things he’s created in his PT career. Notably, PT Day of Service, Move Together and Movement X.

How did Josh go from an idea, to a full on worldwide movement… again and again?

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How He Built this with Josh D'Angelo of PT Day of Service From APTA's National Student Conclave we talk with Josh D'Angelo about the things he's created in his PT career. Notably, PT Day of Service, Move Together and Movement X.



How did Josh go from an idea, to a full on worldwide movement... again and again?
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 24:11
How She Built This – The Movement Maestro https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/11/05/how-she-built-this-the-movement-maestro/ Tue, 05 Nov 2019 13:58:27 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5972 Recorded live from the APTA National Student Conclave with The Movement Maestro. She is a Physical Therapist who flies around the world as an instructor for Rock Tape as well as her own Movement Courses... and the whole time she brings you along for the ride via her cell phone. She’s grown her digital brand to more than 60,000 followers and she’s leveraged that to be able to create her own career... from scratch.  Recorded live from the APTA National Student Conclave with The Movement Maestro.

She is a Physical Therapist who flies around the world as an instructor for Rock Tape as well as her own Movement Courses… and the whole time she brings you along for the ride via her cell phone.

She’s grown her digital brand to more than 60,000 followers and she’s leveraged that to be able to create her own career… from scratch. 

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How She Built This - The Movement Maestro Recorded live from the APTA National Student Conclave with The Movement Maestro.



She is a Physical Therapist who flies around the world as an instructor for Rock Tape as well as her own Movement Courses... and the whole time she brings you along for the ride via her cell phone.



She’s grown her digital brand to more than 60,000 followers and she’s leveraged that to be able to create her own career... from scratch. 
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 22:28
#TBT – Communication is Currency with Jimmy McKay https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/10/31/tbt-communication-is-currency-with-jimmy-mckay/ Thu, 31 Oct 2019 10:00:55 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5961 A few years ago I got the chance to give an "Ignite" talk at the APTA National Student Conclave. A 5 min talk on one topic where your slides change on you automatically every 20 seconds... so you've gotta keep it QUICK and to the POINT! I talked about how communication is currency, it has value and you need to treat is as such. Both directly with patients and with the public at large. A few years ago I got the chance to give an “Ignite” talk at the APTA National Student Conclave.

A 5 min talk on one topic where your slides change on you automatically every 20 seconds… so you’ve gotta keep it QUICK and to the POINT!

I talked about how communication is currency, it has value and you need to treat is as such. Both directly with patients and with the public at large.

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#TBT - Communication is Currency with Jimmy McKay A few years ago I got the chance to give an "Ignite" talk at the APTA National Student Conclave.



A 5 min talk on one topic where your slides change on you automatically every 20 seconds... so you've gotta keep it QUICK and to the POINT!



I talked about how communication is currency, it has value and you need to treat is as such. Both directly with patients and with the public at large.
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 23:53
Research Episode! Cerebral Blood Flow during exercise with Timo Klein & Chris Askew https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/10/30/research-episode-cerebral-blood-flow-during-exercise-with-timo-klein-chris-askew/ Wed, 30 Oct 2019 13:33:15 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5963 We talked with researchers Timo Klein and Chris Askew from the VasoActive Research Group about a recent publication in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise titled Cerebral Blood Flow during Interval and Continuous Exercise in Young and Old Men. Link to paper here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30768552 Great insight into what happens to blood flow inside the brain when young men vs older men perform interval or continuous exercise. Implications for physical therapists working with older adults as well as what types of exercises should we be performing throughout the aging spectrum. We talked with researchers Timo Klein and Chris Askew from the VasoActive Research Group about a recent publication in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise titled Cerebral Blood Flow during Interval and Continuous Exercise in Young and Old Men.

Link to paper here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30768552

Great insight into what happens to blood flow inside the brain when young men vs older men perform interval or continuous exercise. Implications for physical therapists working with older adults as well as what types of exercises should we be performing throughout the aging spectrum.

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Research Episode! Cerebral Blood Flow during exercise with Timo Klein & Chris Askew We talked with researchers Timo Klein and Chris Askew from the VasoActive Research Group about a recent publication in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise titled Cerebral Blood Flow during Interval and Continuous Exercise in Young and Old Men.



Link to paper here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30768552



Great insight into what happens to blood flow inside the brain when young men vs older men perform interval or continuous exercise. Implications for physical therapists working with older adults as well as what types of exercises should we be performing throughout the aging spectrum.
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 23:20
Getting inside the Home Health Section with Dee Kornetti https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/10/29/getting-inside-the-home-health-section-with-dee-kornetti/ Tue, 29 Oct 2019 11:00:19 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5957 We look inside the Home Health Section of the APTA with president Dee Kornetti. Website: https://www.homehealthsection.org/ Profile: http://aptaapps.apta.org/componentconnection/profile.aspx?compcode=B&UniqueKey= Brochure: https://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Chapters_and_Sections/Sections/HomeHealthSectionBrochure.pdf Twitter: https://twitter.com/HomeHealthAPTA Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HomeHealthAPTA/ We look inside the Home Health Section of the APTA with president Dee Kornetti.

Website: https://www.homehealthsection.org/

Profile: http://aptaapps.apta.org/componentconnection/profile.aspx?compcode=B&UniqueKey=

Brochure: https://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Chapters_and_Sections/Sections/HomeHealthSectionBrochure.pdf

Twitter: https://twitter.com/HomeHealthAPTA

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HomeHealthAPTA/

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Getting inside the Home Health Section with Dee Kornetti We look inside the Home Health Section of the APTA with president Dee Kornetti.



Website: https://www.homehealthsection.org/



Profile: http://aptaapps.apta.org/componentconnection/profile.aspx?compcode=B&UniqueKey=



Brochure: https://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Chapters_and_Sections/Sections/HomeHealthSectionBrochure.pdf



Twitter: https://twitter.com/HomeHealthAPTA



Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HomeHealthAPTA/
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 22:30
Academy of Clinical Electrophysiology & Wound Management with Karen Gibbs https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/10/28/academy-of-clinical-electrophysiology-wound-management-with-karen-gibbs/ Mon, 28 Oct 2019 13:00:31 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5955 We look into the Academy of Clinical Electrophysiology & Wound Management with current president Karen Gibbs. We look into their Special Interest Groups (SIGs) as well as their clinical certifications. Website: https://www.acewm.org/ Profile: http://aptaapps.apta.org/componentconnection/profile.aspx?compcode=K&UniqueKey= Brochure: http://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Chapters_and_Sections/Sections/ElectroSectionBrochure.pdf Twitter: https://twitter.com/womens_pt Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/APTAACEWM We look into the Academy of Clinical Electrophysiology & Wound Management with current president Karen Gibbs. We look into their Special Interest Groups (SIGs) as well as their clinical certifications.

Website: https://www.acewm.org/

Profile: http://aptaapps.apta.org/componentconnection/profile.aspx?compcode=K&UniqueKey=

Brochure: http://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Chapters_and_Sections/Sections/ElectroSectionBrochure.pdf

Twitter: https://twitter.com/womens_pt

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/APTAACEWM

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Academy of Electrophysiology & Wound Management with Karen Gibbs We look into the Academy of Clinical Electrophysiology & Wound Management with current president Karen Gibbs. We look into their Special Interest Groups (SIGs) as well as their clinical certifications.



Website: https://www.acewm.org/



Profile: http://aptaapps.apta.org/componentconnection/profile.aspx?compcode=K&UniqueKey=



Brochure: http://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Chapters_and_Sections/Sections/ElectroSectionBrochure.pdf



Twitter: https://twitter.com/womens_pt



Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/APTAACEWM
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 19:45
APTA’s Private Practice section with Jerry Durham https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/10/25/aptas-private-practice-section-with-jerry-durham/ Fri, 25 Oct 2019 10:00:49 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5951 We look into the Private Practice Section (PPS) of the APTA with member Jerry Durham. What goes into the section and most importantly, what can you get out of it as a member? Website: https://ppsapta.org Profile: http://aptaapps.apta.org/componentconnection/profile.aspx?compcode=E&UniqueKey= Brochure: https://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Chapters_and_Sections/Sections/PPSBrochure.pdf Twitter: https://twitter.com/PPS_APTA Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PrivatePracticeSection We look into the Private Practice Section (PPS) of the APTA with member Jerry Durham. What goes into the section and most importantly, what can you get out of it as a member?

Website: https://ppsapta.org

Profile: http://aptaapps.apta.org/componentconnection/profile.aspx?compcode=E&UniqueKey=

Brochure: https://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Chapters_and_Sections/Sections/PPSBrochure.pdf

Twitter: https://twitter.com/PPS_APTA

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PrivatePracticeSection

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We look into the Private Practice Section (PPS) of the APTA with member Jerry Durham. What goes into the section and most importantly, what can you get out of it as a member? Website: https://ppsapta.org Profile: http://aptaapps.apta. We look into the Private Practice Section (PPS) of the APTA with member Jerry Durham. What goes into the section and most importantly, what can you get out of it as a member?



Website: https://ppsapta.org



Profile: http://aptaapps.apta.org/componentconnection/profile.aspx?compcode=E&UniqueKey=



Brochure: https://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Chapters_and_Sections/Sections/PPSBrochure.pdf



Twitter: https://twitter.com/PPS_APTA



Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PrivatePracticeSection
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 19:23
Academy of Pelvic Health Physical Therapy with Carrie Pagliano https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/10/24/academy-of-pelvic-health-physical-therapy-with-carrie-pagliano/ Thu, 24 Oct 2019 13:13:06 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5947 We look into the Women's Health Section of the APTA... or after a long awaited name change the Academy of Pelvic Health Physical Therapy with current president Carrie Pagliano Website: https://www.womenshealthapta.org/ Profile: http://aptaapps.apta.org/componentconnection/profile.aspx?compcode=M&UniqueKey= Brochure: https://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Chapters_and_Sections/Sections/WomensSectionBrochure.pdf Twitter: https://twitter.com/womens_pt Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/womens.health.PT We look into the Women’s Health Section of the APTA… or after a long awaited name change the Academy of Pelvic Health Physical Therapy with current president Carrie Pagliano

Website: https://www.womenshealthapta.org/

Profile: http://aptaapps.apta.org/componentconnection/profile.aspx?compcode=M&UniqueKey=

Brochure: https://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Chapters_and_Sections/Sections/WomensSectionBrochure.pdf

Twitter: https://twitter.com/womens_pt

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/womens.health.PT

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Academy of Pelvic Health Physical Therapy with Carrie Pagliano We look into the Women's Health Section of the APTA... or after a long awaited name change the Academy of Pelvic Health Physical Therapy with current president Carrie Pagliano



Website: https://www.womenshealthapta.org/



Profile: http://aptaapps.apta.org/componentconnection/profile.aspx?compcode=M&UniqueKey=



Brochure: https://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Chapters_and_Sections/Sections/WomensSectionBrochure.pdf



Twitter: https://twitter.com/womens_pt



Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/womens.health.PT
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 15:04
PT Proud in the APTA with Melissa Hoffman & Karla Bell https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/10/21/pt-proud-in-the-apta-with-melissa-hoffman-karla-bell/ Mon, 21 Oct 2019 10:00:25 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5937 We talk to Melissa Hoffman and Karla Bell from the Health Policy and Administration sections PT Proud committee. Website: https://www.ptproud.org/ Profile:http://www.apta.org/apta/components/public/componentprofile.aspx?navID=10737421970&compcode=Y Brochure: https://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Chapters_and_Sections/Sections/HealthPolicySectionBrochure.pdf Twitter: https://twitter.com/ptproudapta Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PTProud/ We talk to Melissa Hoffman and Karla Bell from the Health Policy and Administration sections PT Proud committee.

Website: https://www.ptproud.org/

Profile:http://www.apta.org/apta/components/public/componentprofile.aspx?navID=10737421970&compcode=Y

Brochure: https://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Chapters_and_Sections/Sections/HealthPolicySectionBrochure.pdf

Twitter: https://twitter.com/ptproudapta

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PTProud/

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We talk to Melissa Hoffman and Karla Bell from the Health Policy and Administration sections PT Proud committee. Website: https://www.ptproud.org/ Profile:http://www.apta.org/apta/components/public/componentprofile.aspx? We talk to Melissa Hoffman and Karla Bell from the Health Policy and Administration sections PT Proud committee.



Website: https://www.ptproud.org/



Profile:http://www.apta.org/apta/components/public/componentprofile.aspx?navID=10737421970&compcode=Y



Brochure: https://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Chapters_and_Sections/Sections/HealthPolicySectionBrochure.pdf



Twitter: https://twitter.com/ptproudapta



Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PTProud/
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 16:58
APTA’s Health Policy and Administration AKA The Catalyst with Matt Mesibov https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/10/17/aptas-health-policy-and-administration-aka-the-catalyst-with-matt-mesibov/ Thu, 17 Oct 2019 10:00:31 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5932 We look into the Health Policy and Administration section of the APTA. AKA The Catalyst with their President Matt Mesibov Website: https://www.aptahpa.org/ Profile: http://aptaapps.apta.org/componentconnection/profile.aspx?compcode=Y&UniqueKey= Brochure: http://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Chapters_and_Sections/Sections/FederalSectionBrochure.pdf Twitter: https://twitter.com/HPAAPTA Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HPATheCatalyst/ We look into the Health Policy and Administration section of the APTA. AKA The Catalyst with their President Matt Mesibov

Website: https://www.aptahpa.org/

Profile: http://aptaapps.apta.org/componentconnection/profile.aspx?compcode=Y&UniqueKey=

Brochure: http://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Chapters_and_Sections/Sections/FederalSectionBrochure.pdf

Twitter: https://twitter.com/HPAAPTA

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HPATheCatalyst/

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APTA's Health Policy and Administration AKA The Catalyst with Matt Mesibov We look into the Health Policy and Administration section of the APTA. AKA The Catalyst with their President Matt Mesibov



Website: https://www.aptahpa.org/



Profile: http://aptaapps.apta.org/componentconnection/profile.aspx?compcode=Y&UniqueKey=



Brochure: http://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Chapters_and_Sections/Sections/FederalSectionBrochure.pdf



Twitter: https://twitter.com/HPAAPTA



Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HPATheCatalyst/
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 18:49
Academy of Orthopedic Physical Therapy with Joe Donnelly https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/10/16/academy-of-orthopedic-physical-therapy-with-joe-donnelly/ Wed, 16 Oct 2019 22:45:54 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5930 We look into the Academy of Orthopedic Physical Therapy with their President Joe Donnelly. Website: https://www.orthopt.org/ Profile: http://aptaapps.apta.org/componentconnection/profile.aspx?compcode=R&UniqueKey= Brochure: https://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Chapters_and_Sections/Sections/OrthoSectionBrochure.pdf Twitter: https://twitter.com/OrthopaedicAPTA Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/OrthopaedicAPTA/ We look into the Academy of Orthopedic Physical Therapy with their President Joe Donnelly.

Website: https://www.orthopt.org/

Profile: http://aptaapps.apta.org/componentconnection/profile.aspx?compcode=R&UniqueKey=

Brochure: https://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Chapters_and_Sections/Sections/OrthoSectionBrochure.pdf

Twitter: https://twitter.com/OrthopaedicAPTA

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/OrthopaedicAPTA/

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Academy of Orthopedic Physical Therapy with Joe Donnelly We look into the Academy of Orthopedic Physical Therapy with their President Joe Donnelly.



Website: https://www.orthopt.org/



Profile: http://aptaapps.apta.org/componentconnection/profile.aspx?compcode=R&UniqueKey=



Brochure: https://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Chapters_and_Sections/Sections/OrthoSectionBrochure.pdf



Twitter: https://twitter.com/OrthopaedicAPTA



Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/OrthopaedicAPTA/
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 17:50
APTA Section on Research with Julie Tilson https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/10/15/apta-section-on-research-with-julie-tilson/ Tue, 15 Oct 2019 10:00:08 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5925 We look inside the APTA's Section on Research with Julie Tilson Total Members: 4,344 Website: www.PTResearch.org Twitter: https://twitter.com/ResearchAPTA Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/researchsection/ Special Interest Groups Biomechanics ResearchEarly Career ResearchersEvidence Based PracticeQualitative Research We look inside the APTA’s Section on Research with Julie Tilson

Total Members: 4,344

Website: www.PTResearch.org

Twitter: https://twitter.com/ResearchAPTA

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/researchsection/

Special Interest Groups

  • Biomechanics Research
  • Early Career Researchers
  • Evidence Based Practice
  • Qualitative Research
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APTA Section on Research with Julie Tilson We look inside the APTA's Section on Research with Julie Tilson



Total Members: 4,344



Website: www.PTResearch.org



Twitter: https://twitter.com/ResearchAPTA



Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/researchsection/



Special Interest Groups



* Biomechanics Research* Early Career Researchers* Evidence Based Practice* Qualitative Research
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 17:01
Clinical Sports PT Webinar Series from Within Reach Health https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/10/14/clinical-sports-pt-webinar-series-from-within-reach-health/ Mon, 14 Oct 2019 22:00:40 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5923 We talked to Brynn Rooney and Kayla Epperson about a new Sports PT webinar series they're releasing this month that's focused at PT students and New Grads. You can find the series here: https://www.withinreachhealth.com/current-programs-overview This monthly webinar series is for student physical therapists looking to grow their knowledge and confidence in sports physical therapy. Over the course of twelve months, club members will learn about sport-specific physical therapy topics directly applicable to clinical practice. Each once-monthly webinar will blend didactic content with clinical cases and Q&A. Participants will gain membership to a private Facebook group for further networking and conversation. We talked to Brynn Rooney and Kayla Epperson about a new Sports PT webinar series they’re releasing this month that’s focused at PT students and New Grads.

You can find the series here: https://www.withinreachhealth.com/current-programs-overview

This monthly webinar series is for student physical therapists looking to grow their knowledge and confidence in sports physical therapy. Over the course of twelve months, club members will learn about sport-specific physical therapy topics directly applicable to clinical practice. Each once-monthly webinar will blend didactic content with clinical cases and Q&A. Participants will gain membership to a private Facebook group for further networking and conversation.

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Clinical Sports PT Webinar Series from Within Reach Health We talked to Brynn Rooney and Kayla Epperson about a new Sports PT webinar series they're releasing this month that's focused at PT students and New Grads.



You can find the series here: https://www.withinreachhealth.com/current-programs-overview



This monthly webinar series is for student physical therapists looking to grow their knowledge and confidence in sports physical therapy. Over the course of twelve months, club members will learn about sport-specific physical therapy topics directly applicable to clinical practice. Each once-monthly webinar will blend didactic content with clinical cases and Q&A. Participants will gain membership to a private Facebook group for further networking and conversation.
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 22:59
The Non Clinical PT Meredith Castin https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/10/10/the-non-clinical-pt-meredith-castin/ Thu, 10 Oct 2019 11:00:06 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5892 We talk with Meredith Castin, creator of TheNonClinicalPT.com is the #1 resource for PTs, OTs, SLPs, and assistants seeking non-clinical healthcare careers. It was created by Meredith Castin, PT, DPT in 2017, and has grown from a simple reference page to a thriving community filled with inspiring, forward-thinking rehab professionals committed to improving healthcare. We talk with Meredith Castin, creator of TheNonClinicalPT.com is the #1 resource for PTs, OTs, SLPs, and assistants seeking non-clinical healthcare careers.

It was created by Meredith Castin, PT, DPT in 2017, and has grown from a simple reference page to a thriving community filled with inspiring, forward-thinking rehab professionals committed to improving healthcare.

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The Non Clinical PT Meredith Castin We talk with Meredith Castin, creator of TheNonClinicalPT.com is the #1 resource for PTs, OTs, SLPs, and assistants seeking non-clinical healthcare careers.



It was created by Meredith Castin, PT, DPT in 2017, and has grown from a simple reference page to a thriving community filled with inspiring, forward-thinking rehab professionals committed to improving healthcare.
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 40:04
Federal Section Spotlight with Mark Havran https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/10/09/federal-section-spotlight-with-mark-havran/ Wed, 09 Oct 2019 11:00:18 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5907 We look into the Federal Section of the APTA with Mark Havran. Website: http://federalpt.org/ Profile: http://aptaapps.apta.org/componentconnection/profile.aspx?compcode=R&UniqueKey= Brochure: http://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Chapters_and_Sections/Sections/FederalSectionBrochure.pdf Twitter: https://twitter.com/FederalPT Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Federal-Section-APTA-110186255743455/ We look into the Federal Section of the APTA with Mark Havran.

Website: http://federalpt.org/

Profile: http://aptaapps.apta.org/componentconnection/profile.aspx?compcode=R&UniqueKey=

Brochure: http://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Chapters_and_Sections/Sections/FederalSectionBrochure.pdf

Twitter: https://twitter.com/FederalPT

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Federal-Section-APTA-110186255743455/

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Federal Section Spotlight with Mark Havran We look into the Federal Section of the APTA with Mark Havran.



Website: http://federalpt.org/



Profile: http://aptaapps.apta.org/componentconnection/profile.aspx?compcode=R&UniqueKey=



Brochure: http://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Chapters_and_Sections/Sections/FederalSectionBrochure.pdf



Twitter: https://twitter.com/FederalPT



Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Federal-Section-APTA-110186255743455/
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 11:30
Are you a Hybrid Physical Therapist? With Sarabeth Berk https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/10/08/are-you-a-hybrid-physical-therapist-with-sarabeth-berk/ Tue, 08 Oct 2019 11:00:22 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5874 Hybrid professionals are hiding among us, and Sarahbeth Berk is one of them! And... you might be too! After this episode, her website MoreThanMyTitle.com is where you should start crafting your hybrid identity. Sarabeth is on a crusade to share this idea with the world. She thinks it matters to the gig economy, millennials, freelancers, independent contractors, people in career transition, and people who work inside of big companies and wear multiple hats. Recruiters should know how to look for hybrids, and managers should know how to train and retain them on their teams. In today’s society, the most successful professionals don’t just do more than one thing. They blend and combine multiple professional identities together, making them more than their titles!   This is a career lesson in audio form, the profession of physical therapists needs more hybrids! Hybrid professionals are hiding among us, and Sarahbeth Berk is one of them! And… you might be too! After this episode, her website MoreThanMyTitle.com is where you should start crafting your hybrid identity.

Sarabeth is on a crusade to share this idea with the world.

She thinks it matters to the gig economy, millennials, freelancers, independent contractors, people in career transition, and people who work inside of big companies and wear multiple hats.

Recruiters should know how to look for hybrids, and managers should know how to train and retain them on their teams.

In today’s society, the most successful professionals don’t just do more than one thing. They blend and combine multiple professional identities together, making them more than their titles!  

This is a career lesson in audio form, the profession of physical therapists needs more hybrids!

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Are you a Hybrid Physical Therapist? With Sarabeth Berk Hybrid professionals are hiding among us, and Sarahbeth Berk is one of them! And... you might be too! After this episode, her website MoreThanMyTitle.com is where you should start crafting your hybrid identity.



Sarabeth is on a crusade to share this idea with the world.



She thinks it matters to the gig economy, millennials, freelancers, independent contractors, people in career transition, and people who work inside of big companies and wear multiple hats.



Recruiters should know how to look for hybrids, and managers should know how to train and retain them on their teams.



In today’s society, the most successful professionals don’t just do more than one thing. They blend and combine multiple professional identities together, making them more than their titles!  



This is a career lesson in audio form, the profession of physical therapists needs more hybrids!
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 46:06
Academy of Oncologic Physical Therapy spotlight with Steve Morris https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/10/07/academy-of-oncologic-physical-therapy-spotlight-with-steve-morris/ Mon, 07 Oct 2019 10:00:47 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5899 We spotlight the Academy of Oncologic Physical Therapy with Dr. Steve Morris from Wingate University. Current Member: 1,407 Website: http://www.oncologypt.org/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/aptaoncologypt Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AcademyofOncPT Journal: https://journals.lww.com/rehabonc/pages/default.aspx We spotlight the Academy of Oncologic Physical Therapy with Dr. Steve Morris from Wingate University.

Current Member: 1,407

Website: http://www.oncologypt.org/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/aptaoncologypt

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AcademyofOncPT

Journal: https://journals.lww.com/rehabonc/pages/default.aspx

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Academy of Oncologic Physical Therapy We spotlight the Academy of Oncologic Physical Therapy with Dr. Steve Morris from Wingate University.



Current Member: 1,407



Website: http://www.oncologypt.org/



Twitter: https://twitter.com/aptaoncologypt



Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AcademyofOncPT



Journal: https://journals.lww.com/rehabonc/pages/default.aspx
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 20:38
Academy of Geriatric Physical Therapy Spotlight with Cathy Ciolek https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/10/03/american-academy-of-geriatric-physical-therapists-spotlight-with-cathy-ciolek/ Thu, 03 Oct 2019 11:00:16 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5887 PT month spotlight turns to the Academy of Geriatric Physical Therapists with VP Cathy Ciolek. Current members: 5,549 Website: http://www.geriatricspt.org Twitter: https://twitter.com/APTA_Geriatrics Journal: https://journals.lww.com/jgpt/pages/default.aspx PT month spotlight turns to the Academy of Geriatric Physical Therapists with VP Cathy Ciolek.

Current members: 5,549

Website: http://www.geriatricspt.org

Twitter: https://twitter.com/APTA_Geriatrics

Journal: https://journals.lww.com/jgpt/pages/default.aspx

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Academy of Geriatric Physical Therapy Spotlight with Cathy Ciolek PT month spotlight turns to the Academy of Geriatric Physical Therapists with VP Cathy Ciolek.



Current members: 5,549



Website: http://www.geriatricspt.org



Twitter: https://twitter.com/APTA_Geriatrics



Journal: https://journals.lww.com/jgpt/pages/default.aspx
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 30:36
The 411 on #Travel PT with Jared Casazza https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/10/02/the-411-on-travel-pt-with-jared-casazza/ Wed, 02 Oct 2019 10:45:50 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5871 We get the inside scoop on #TravelPT from Jared Casazza from Fifth Wheel PT - fifthwheelpt.com. Jared will be presenting at APTA's NSC in New Mexico this October on the topic so we went inside his presentation for a sneak peek. We get the inside scoop on #TravelPT from Jared Casazza from Fifth Wheel PT – fifthwheelpt.com.

Jared will be presenting at APTA’s NSC in New Mexico this October on the topic so we went inside his presentation for a sneak peek.

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The 411 on #Travel PT with Jared Casazza We get the inside scoop on #TravelPT from Jared Casazza from Fifth Wheel PT - fifthwheelpt.com.



Jared will be presenting at APTA's NSC in New Mexico this October on the topic so we went inside his presentation for a sneak peek.
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 29:04
Cardiovascular & Pulmonary Section Spotlight with Pam Bartlo https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/10/01/cardiovascular-pulmonary-section-spotlight-with-pam-bartlo/ Tue, 01 Oct 2019 11:00:30 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5885 During PT month we are highlighting each section of the APTA. We start with the Cardiovascular and Pulmonary section with VP Pam Bartlo. Current members: 1,612 Website: https://www.cardiopt.org/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/aptacvp?lang=en Journal: https://journals.lww.com/cptj/pages/default.aspx Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/cardiopulmonary-physical-therapy-journal-cardiopulmonary/id1193694143 During PT month we are highlighting each section of the APTA. We start with the Cardiovascular and Pulmonary section with VP Pam Bartlo.

Current members: 1,612

Website: https://www.cardiopt.org/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/aptacvp?lang=en

Journal: https://journals.lww.com/cptj/pages/default.aspx

Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/cardiopulmonary-physical-therapy-journal-cardiopulmonary/id1193694143

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Cardiovascular & Pulmonary Section Spotlight with Pam Bartlo During PT month we are highlighting each section of the APTA. We start with the Cardiovascular and Pulmonary section with VP Pam Bartlo.



Current members: 1,612



Website: https://www.cardiopt.org/



Twitter: https://twitter.com/aptacvp?lang=en



Journal: https://journals.lww.com/cptj/pages/default.aspx



Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/cardiopulmonary-physical-therapy-journal-cardiopulmonary/id1193694143
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 32:06
National Student Conclave Preview with Kyle Stapleton & Rachel Granzow https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/09/30/national-student-conclave-preview-with-kyle-stapleton-rachel-granzow/ Mon, 30 Sep 2019 11:00:24 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5904 We talked to Kyle Stapleton and Rachel Granzow, two PT students heading to the National Student Conclave this year in Albuquerque New Mexico. We walk you through the programming and social events you can't miss this year. Website for the conference: http://www.apta.org/nsc/ Programming Overview: http://www.apta.org/NSC/Programming/ Registration: http://www.apta.org/NSC/Registration/ We talked to Kyle Stapleton and Rachel Granzow, two PT students heading to the National Student Conclave this year in Albuquerque New Mexico.

We walk you through the programming and social events you can’t miss this year.

Website for the conference: http://www.apta.org/nsc/

Programming Overview: http://www.apta.org/NSC/Programming/

Registration: http://www.apta.org/NSC/Registration/

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National Student Conclave Preview with Kyle Stapleton & Rachel Granzow We talked to Kyle Stapleton and Rachel Granzow, two PT students heading to the National Student Conclave this year in Albuquerque New Mexico.



We walk you through the programming and social events you can't miss this year.



Website for the conference: http://www.apta.org/nsc/



Programming Overview: http://www.apta.org/NSC/Programming/



Registration: http://www.apta.org/NSC/Registration/
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 27:21
The National Youth Sports Strategy from HHS with Kara Gainer & Hadiya Green Guerrero from the APTA https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/09/27/the-national-youth-sports-strategy-from-hhs-with-kara-gainer-hadiya-green-guerrero-from-the-apta/ Fri, 27 Sep 2019 11:00:20 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5897 HHS released its National Youth Sports Strategy. APTA worked with members to submit comments to HHS on its initial youth sports participation request for information as well as the draft youth sports strategy released over the summer. We talked to Kara Gainer & Hadiya Green Guerrero from APTA about: What the strategy is. How the APTA was able to comment on it before it came out. And how YOU can help implement it with your patients and community. Take a look at the full document here: http://health.gov/paguidelines/youth-sports-strategy HHS released its National Youth Sports Strategy. APTA worked with members to submit comments to HHS on its initial youth sports participation request for information as well as the draft youth sports strategy released over the summer.

We talked to Kara Gainer & Hadiya Green Guerrero from APTA about:

What the strategy is.

How the APTA was able to comment on it before it came out.

And how YOU can help implement it with your patients and community.

Take a look at the full document here: http://health.gov/paguidelines/youth-sports-strategy

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The National Youth Sports Strategy from HHS with Kara Gainer & Hadiya Green Guerrero from the APTA HHS released its National Youth Sports Strategy. APTA worked with members to submit comments to HHS on its initial youth sports participation request for information as well as the draft youth sports strategy released over the summer.



We talked to Kara Gainer & Hadiya Green Guerrero from APTA about:



What the strategy is.



How the APTA was able to comment on it before it came out.



And how YOU can help implement it with your patients and community.



Take a look at the full document here: http://health.gov/paguidelines/youth-sports-strategy
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 19:41
#TBT Does Hurt Equal Harm? Understanding pain w/ Kory Zimney. https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/09/26/tbt-does-hurt-equal-harm-understanding-pain-w-kory-zimney/ Thu, 26 Sep 2019 10:00:00 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5854 We go WAY back on #TBT with episode #36 that featured Kory Zimney. Recorded live at National Student Conclave in Omaha Nebraska when Kory presented and asked "Does Hurt Equal Harm?" We had to know the answer and now you can to. We go WAY back on #TBT with episode #36 that featured Kory Zimney.
Recorded live at National Student Conclave in Omaha Nebraska when Kory presented and asked “Does Hurt Equal Harm?”

We had to know the answer and now you can to.

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#TBT Does Hurt Equal Harm? Understanding pain w/ Kory Zimney. We go WAY back on #TBT with episode #36 that featured Kory Zimney. Recorded live at National Student Conclave in Omaha Nebraska when Kory presented and asked "Does Hurt Equal Harm?"



We had to know the answer and now you can to.
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 24:24
Patellofemoral Pain CPG from JOSPT with Rich Willy https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/09/25/patellofemoral-pain-cpg-from-jospt-with-rich-willy/ Wed, 25 Sep 2019 11:00:29 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5869 Rich Willy is the lead author on a new CPG for Patellafemoral Pain from JOSPT. You can get it open access here: https://www.jospt.org/doi/full/10.2519/jospt.2019.0302 pRich gives us the overview of the CPG Rich Willy is the lead author on a new CPG for Patellafemoral Pain from JOSPT. You can get it open access here: https://www.jospt.org/doi/full/10.2519/jospt.2019.0302

pRich gives us the overview of the CPG

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Patellofemoral Pain CPG from JOSPT with Rich Willy Rich Willy is the lead author on a new CPG for Patellafemoral Pain from JOSPT. You can get it open access here: https://www.jospt.org/doi/full/10.2519/jospt.2019.0302



pRich gives us the overview of the CPG
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 31:42
How to prevent falls with MDs + PTs. GAPcare (Geriatric Acute and Post-Acute Fall Prevention Intervention) with Dr. Liz Goldberg MD https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/09/24/how-to-prevent-falls-with-mds-pts-gapcare-geriatric-acute-and-post-acute-fall-prevention-intervention-with-dr-liz-goldberg-md/ Tue, 24 Sep 2019 14:46:41 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5895 Liz Goldberg, MD, ScM is a practicing emergency medicine physician and an NIH-funded researcher on fall prevention. She is passionate about improving the care of older adults who seek acute care. Her GAPcare (The Geriatric Acute and Post-Acute Fall Prevention Intervention) study brings together health professionals - physical therapists, pharmacists, physicians, and nurses - to work together to prevent recurrent falls in older adults who present to the emergency department. Her newest research, GAPcare II, leverages sensors in the Apple Watch to obtain at-home measures of gait and function in older adults. How to build multidisciplinary teams that work together in the emergency department The anatomy/core of a brief PT intervention to prevent recurrent falls in emergency department patients Why your (PT) skills are essential in the EDs of tomorrow Dr Goldberg on Twitter: https://twitter.com/emupdate Liz Goldberg, MD, ScM is a practicing emergency medicine physician and an NIH-funded researcher on fall prevention. She is passionate about improving the care of older adults who seek acute care. Her GAPcare (The Geriatric Acute and Post-Acute Fall Prevention Intervention) study brings together health professionals – physical therapists, pharmacists, physicians, and nurses – to work together to prevent recurrent falls in older adults who present to the emergency department. Her newest research, GAPcare II, leverages sensors in the Apple Watch to obtain at-home measures of gait and function in older adults.

  • How to build multidisciplinary teams that work together in the emergency department
  • The anatomy/core of a brief PT intervention to prevent recurrent falls in emergency department patients
  • Why your (PT) skills are essential in the EDs of tomorrow

Dr Goldberg on Twitter: https://twitter.com/emupdate

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How to prevent falls with MDs + PTs. GAPcare (Geriatric Acute and Post-Acute Fall Prevention Intervention) with Dr. Liz Goldberg MD Liz Goldberg, MD, ScM is a practicing emergency medicine physician and an NIH-funded researcher on fall prevention. She is passionate about improving the care of older adults who seek acute care. Her GAPcare (The Geriatric Acute and Post-Acute Fall Prevention Intervention) study brings together health professionals - physical therapists, pharmacists, physicians, and nurses - to work together to prevent recurrent falls in older adults who present to the emergency department. Her newest research, GAPcare II, leverages sensors in the Apple Watch to obtain at-home measures of gait and function in older adults.



* How to build multidisciplinary teams that work together in the emergency department



* The anatomy/core of a brief PT intervention to prevent recurrent falls in emergency department patients



* Why your (PT) skills are essential in the EDs of tomorrow



Dr Goldberg on Twitter: https://twitter.com/emupdate
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 32:30
From idea to product – Behind MOBO with Jay Dicharry https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/09/23/from-idea-to-product-behind-mobo-with-jay-dicharry/ Mon, 23 Sep 2019 11:00:09 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5867 Jay Dicharry comes back on the show to talk about a product he just released called a MOBO board. Which focuses on concepts of strength training the foot in athletes. Take a look or get yours here MOBO and for YOU (yes you!) get 10% off with promo code: PTPINTCAST10 (all caps) ;-) you're welcome! Jay's Website Twitter: https://twitter.com/ReboundPhysio Jay Dicharry comes back on the show to talk about a product he just released called a MOBO board. Which focuses on concepts of strength training the foot in athletes.

Take a look or get yours here MOBO and for YOU (yes you!) get 10% off with promo code: PTPINTCAST10 (all caps) 😉 you’re welcome!

Jay’s Website

Twitter: https://twitter.com/ReboundPhysio

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From idea to product - Behind MOBO with Jay Dicharry Jay Dicharry comes back on the show to talk about a product he just released called a MOBO board. Which focuses on concepts of strength training the foot in athletes.



Take a look or get yours here MOBO and for YOU (yes you!) get 10% off with promo code: PTPINTCAST10 (all caps) ;-) you're welcome!



Jay's Website



Twitter: https://twitter.com/ReboundPhysio




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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 27:26
#TBT Pain Perception with Steve George over a Boddingtons Ale https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/09/19/tbt-pain-perception-with-steve-george-over-a-boddingtons-ale/ Thu, 19 Sep 2019 10:00:42 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5852 We talked to Duke's Steve George about Pain Perception over a Boddingtons Ale in 2016 and wanted to bring it back up again because of his insight during Pain Awareness Month. We talked to Duke’s Steve George about Pain Perception over a Boddingtons Ale in 2016 and wanted to bring it back up again because of his insight during Pain Awareness Month.

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#TBT Pain Perception with Steve George over a Boddingtons Ale We talked to Duke's Steve George about Pain Perception over a Boddingtons Ale in 2016 and wanted to bring it back up again because of his insight during Pain Awareness Month.
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 49:38
Falls Prevention Awareness Day with NCOA’s Kathleen Cameron https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/09/18/falls-prevention-awareness-day-with-ncoas-kathleen-cameron/ Wed, 18 Sep 2019 10:00:33 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5865 The National Council on Aging's Senior Director Kathleen Cameron talks Falls Prevention Awareness Day. The NCOA has tools and resources available and tries to educate the public about how to prevent falls each year on the first day of... Fall. This year it's September 23rd. Find the NCOA's resources here: https://www.ncoa.org/healthy-aging/falls-prevention/falls-prevention-awareness-day/?utm_source=ncoa&utm_medium=homepage This was originally aired on another podcast that Pintcast host Jimmy McKay produces - FOXcast PT. But we thought the content was so great we wanted to share it again. The National Council on Aging’s Senior Director Kathleen Cameron talks Falls Prevention Awareness Day. The NCOA has tools and resources available and tries to educate the public about how to prevent falls each year on the first day of… Fall.

This year it’s September 23rd.

Find the NCOA’s resources here: https://www.ncoa.org/healthy-aging/falls-prevention/falls-prevention-awareness-day/?utm_source=ncoa&utm_medium=homepage

This was originally aired on another podcast that Pintcast host Jimmy McKay produces – FOXcast PT. But we thought the content was so great we wanted to share it again.

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Falls Prevention Awareness Day with NCOA's Kathleen Cameron The National Council on Aging's Senior Director Kathleen Cameron talks Falls Prevention Awareness Day. The NCOA has tools and resources available and tries to educate the public about how to prevent falls each year on the first day of... Fall.



This year it's September 23rd.



Find the NCOA's resources here: https://www.ncoa.org/healthy-aging/falls-prevention/falls-prevention-awareness-day/?utm_source=ncoa&utm_medium=homepage



This was originally aired on another podcast that Pintcast host Jimmy McKay produces - FOXcast PT. But we thought the content was so great we wanted to share it again.
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 19:01
Behavior Change for treating those in Pain with Jason Silvernail https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/09/16/behavior-change-for-treating-those-in-pain-with-jason-silvernail/ Mon, 16 Sep 2019 15:41:11 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5863 Great insightful conversation with Jason Silvernail about treating those in pain with communication. But more HOW we approach those people and where treating them might fall short on the provider end. Show as always brought to you by Aureus the leaders in #TravelPT www.AureusMedical.com Great insightful conversation with Jason Silvernail about treating those in pain with communication. But more HOW we approach those people and where treating them might fall short on the provider end.

Show as always brought to you by Aureus the leaders in #TravelPT www.AureusMedical.com

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Behavior Change for treating those in Pain with Jason Silvernail Great insightful conversation with Jason Silvernail about treating those in pain with communication. But more HOW we approach those people and where treating them might fall short on the provider end.



Show as always brought to you by Aureus the leaders in #TravelPT www.AureusMedical.com
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 37:30
#TBT The Great Now What? With Stroke Survivor Maggie Whittum https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/09/12/tbt-the-great-now-what-with-stroke-survivor-maggie-whittum/ Thu, 12 Sep 2019 10:00:03 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5849 We talked to Maggie in March of 2019 when she was working on her documentary, "The Great Now What?" about her journey as a stroke survivor. Maggie talks about the things she's lost, a fiancee, a job, freedom. And the things she's gained, chronic pain, a new outlet for her art the chance to share a message. We talked to Maggie in March of 2019 when she was working on her documentary, “The Great Now What?” about her journey as a stroke survivor.

Maggie talks about the things she’s lost, a fiancee, a job, freedom.

And the things she’s gained, chronic pain, a new outlet for her art the chance to share a message.

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#TBT The Great Now What? With Stroke Survivor Maggie Whittum We talked to Maggie in March of 2019 when she was working on her documentary, "The Great Now What?" about her journey as a stroke survivor.



Maggie talks about the things she's lost, a fiancee, a job, freedom.



And the things she's gained, chronic pain, a new outlet for her art the chance to share a message.
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 17:58
The Top 5 things PTs should know about Pain with Jarod Hall https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/09/11/the-top-5-things-pts-should-know-about-pain-with-jarod-hall/ Wed, 11 Sep 2019 19:27:41 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5856 We talked with PT Jarod Hall who loves talking and teaching other clinicians about pain. We threw out the challenge to Jarod and asked him to give us the Top 5 things EVERY PT should know about Pain and here's his list. Find Jarod online: On Twitter: @Jarod_Hall On Instagram: @drjarodhalldpt We talked with PT Jarod Hall who loves talking and teaching other clinicians about pain.

We threw out the challenge to Jarod and asked him to give us the Top 5 things EVERY PT should know about Pain and here’s his list.

Find Jarod online:

On Twitter: @Jarod_Hall

On Instagram: @drjarodhalldpt

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The Top 5 things PTs should know about Pain with Jarod Hall We talked with PT Jarod Hall who loves talking and teaching other clinicians about pain.



We threw out the challenge to Jarod and asked him to give us the Top 5 things EVERY PT should know about Pain and here's his list.



Find Jarod online:



On Twitter: @Jarod_Hall



On Instagram: @drjarodhalldpt
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 49:31
Choose a number from 0-10 that best describes your pain with Ben Cormack https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/09/09/choose-a-number-from-0-10-that-best-describes-your-pain-with-ben-cormack/ Mon, 09 Sep 2019 10:00:31 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5820 We talked with London Physio Ben Cormack about pain and the visual analog scale and how patients reporting of pain can actually be an indication of other factors. We talk about pain, treatment methods and the biopsychosocial model. Ben is a musculoskeletal therapist with a clinical background in sports therapy, rehabilitation, pain science & exercise stretching back 15 years. He specializes in a movement & exercise based approach with a strong education component and patient centered focus. Ben is a popular international presenter who has delivered conferences presentations and courses all over the world. He's a co-host on the Clinical Thinker Podcast Website here On Twitter @CorKinetic We talked with London Physio Ben Cormack about pain and the visual analog scale and how patients reporting of pain can actually be an indication of other factors.

We talk about pain, treatment methods and the biopsychosocial model.

Ben is a musculoskeletal therapist with a clinical background in sports therapy, rehabilitation, pain science & exercise stretching back 15 years. He specializes in a movement & exercise based approach with a strong education component and patient centered focus.

Ben is a popular international presenter who has delivered conferences presentations and courses all over the world.

He’s a co-host on the Clinical Thinker Podcast

Website here

On Twitter @CorKinetic

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Choose a number from 0-10 that best describes your pain with Ben Cormack We talked with London Physio Ben Cormack about pain and the visual analog scale and how patients reporting of pain can actually be an indication of other factors.



We talk about pain, treatment methods and the biopsychosocial model.



Ben is a musculoskeletal therapist with a clinical background in sports therapy, rehabilitation, pain science & exercise stretching back 15 years. He specializes in a movement & exercise based approach with a strong education component and patient centered focus.



Ben is a popular international presenter who has delivered conferences presentations and courses all over the world.



He's a co-host on the Clinical Thinker Podcast



Website here



On Twitter @CorKinetic
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 36:12
The interrelationship between sleep and fatigue, cognition, and pain with Katie Siengsukon, PT, Ph.D https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/09/05/the-interrelationship-between-sleep-and-fatigue-cognition-and-pain-with-katie-siengsukon-pt-ph-d/ Thu, 05 Sep 2019 10:00:48 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5815 Katie Siengsukon is a Physical Therapist and researcher at the Kansas University Medical Center where she is the director of the Sleep, Health, and Wellness Laboratory. Her line of research seeks to understand how sleep impacts function, learning, and overall health particularly with aging and in those with neurological conditions. She possesses a clinical background in outpatient physical therapy treating individuals with musculoskeletal and neurologic injury. Her passion as a PT is helping people sleep better. On twitter @KatieSleepPT Find her bio here Katie Siengsukon is a Physical Therapist and researcher at the Kansas University Medical Center where she is the director of the Sleep, Health, and Wellness Laboratory.

Her line of research seeks to understand how sleep impacts function, learning, and overall health particularly with aging and in those with neurological conditions. She possesses a clinical background in outpatient physical therapy treating individuals with musculoskeletal and neurologic injury.

Her passion as a PT is helping people sleep better.

On twitter @KatieSleepPT

Find her bio here

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The interrelationship between sleep and fatigue, cognition, and pain with Katie Siengsukon, PT, Ph.D Katie Siengsukon is a Physical Therapist and researcher at the Kansas University Medical Center where she is the director of the Sleep, Health, and Wellness Laboratory.



Her line of research seeks to understand how sleep impacts function, learning, and overall health particularly with aging and in those with neurological conditions. She possesses a clinical background in outpatient physical therapy treating individuals with musculoskeletal and neurologic injury.



Her passion as a PT is helping people sleep better.



On twitter @KatieSleepPT



Find her bio here
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 35:44
Ouchie! The APP for treating people with chronic pain https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/09/03/ouchie-the-app-for-treating-chronic-pain/ Tue, 03 Sep 2019 10:00:00 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5721 The Ouchie app allows those living with chronic pain to take control of their pain through sound data driven ideas & social support. We talked to Rachel Trobman the founder of Ouchie about what it can do with the relationship between a patient their chronic pain and their PT. Ouchie allows patients to track their pain, connect with others experiencing similar symptoms, learn and use evidence based interventions like meditation and exercise and earn actual prizes by interacting and using the app! And as a Physical Therapist you can be reimbursed for having your patients use it while you monitor their progress. www.Ouchie.com On twitter @Ouchie The Ouchie app allows those living with chronic pain to take control of their pain through sound data driven ideas & social support.

We talked to Rachel Trobman the founder of Ouchie about what it can do with the relationship between a patient their chronic pain and their PT.

Ouchie allows patients to track their pain, connect with others experiencing similar symptoms, learn and use evidence based interventions like meditation and exercise and earn actual prizes by interacting and using the app!

And as a Physical Therapist you can be reimbursed for having your patients use it while you monitor their progress.

www.Ouchie.com

On twitter @Ouchie

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Ouchie! The APP for treating people with chronic pain The Ouchie app allows those living with chronic pain to take control of their pain through sound data driven ideas & social support.



We talked to Rachel Trobman the founder of Ouchie about what it can do with the relationship between a patient their chronic pain and their PT.



Ouchie allows patients to track their pain, connect with others experiencing similar symptoms, learn and use evidence based interventions like meditation and exercise and earn actual prizes by interacting and using the app!



And as a Physical Therapist you can be reimbursed for having your patients use it while you monitor their progress.



www.Ouchie.com



On twitter @Ouchie
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 34:29
PT in Kenya with @OngwenMartin https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/08/30/pt-in-kenya-with-ongwenmartin/ Fri, 30 Aug 2019 16:55:18 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5813 Jimmy talked with Ongwen Martin from his home in Nairobi Kenya. Ongwen talked about what PT looks like in Kenya, what tools he uses to stay up to date on the profession and what he hopes is the future of PT in his country. The show is brewed by Aureus Medical Staffing the leaders in #Travel PT.Want to travel the country and be a PT? Talk to Aureus here. We wanted to say thanks to them for helping to support the show. Jimmy talked with Ongwen Martin from his home in Nairobi Kenya. Ongwen talked about what PT looks like in Kenya, what tools he uses to stay up to date on the profession and what he hopes is the future of PT in his country.

The show is brewed by Aureus Medical Staffing the leaders in #Travel PT.
Want to travel the country and be a PT? Talk to Aureus here.

We wanted to say thanks to them for helping to support the show.

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PT in Kenya with @OngwenMartin Jimmy talked with Ongwen Martin from his home in Nairobi Kenya. Ongwen talked about what PT looks like in Kenya, what tools he uses to stay up to date on the profession and what he hopes is the future of PT in his country.



The show is brewed by Aureus Medical Staffing the leaders in #Travel PT.Want to travel the country and be a PT? Talk to Aureus here.



We wanted to say thanks to them for helping to support the show.
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 40:25
PT in the ED preventing catastrophe by asking questions with Naveed Shan https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/08/12/pt-in-the-ed-preventing-catastrophe-by-asking-questions-with-naveed-shan/ Mon, 12 Aug 2019 10:00:52 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5773 We saw a patient case shared by Naveed Shan and the ramifications of him NOT asking some simple questions could have lead to a patient's death. But fortunately for everyone involved Naveed is a PT who keeps asking questions when things just don't seem right. Take a listen to his clinical case that happened where Naveed works, in the Emergency Department at Banner Health in Phoenix Arizona. We saw a patient case shared by Naveed Shan and the ramifications of him NOT asking some simple questions could have lead to a patient’s death.

But fortunately for everyone involved Naveed is a PT who keeps asking questions when things just don’t seem right.

Take a listen to his clinical case that happened where Naveed works, in the Emergency Department at Banner Health in Phoenix Arizona.

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PT in the ED preventing catastrophe by asking questions with Naveed Shan We saw a patient case shared by Naveed Shan and the ramifications of him NOT asking some simple questions could have lead to a patient's death.



But fortunately for everyone involved Naveed is a PT who keeps asking questions when things just don't seem right.



Take a listen to his clinical case that happened where Naveed works, in the Emergency Department at Banner Health in Phoenix Arizona.
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 25:00
#TBT Adam Meakins on Manual Therapy https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/08/08/tbt-adam-meakins-on-manual-therapy/ Thu, 08 Aug 2019 10:00:00 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5790 The name Adam Meakins always causes a stir in the profession of Physiotherapy (Physical Therapy for us Yanks). We caught up with Adam last year at this time and wanted to bring back his thoughts on manual therapy. At the time that was the topic of discussion on the social media platforms and true to form Adam didn't hold back. A year later Adam is actually facing some increased scrutiny from his UK governing body about his word selection on social media. We hope for a great outcome where everyone wins in this situation. The name Adam Meakins always causes a stir in the profession of Physiotherapy (Physical Therapy for us Yanks). We caught up with Adam last year at this time and wanted to bring back his thoughts on manual therapy. At the time that was the topic of discussion on the social media platforms and true to form Adam didn’t hold back.

A year later Adam is actually facing some increased scrutiny from his UK governing body about his word selection on social media.

We hope for a great outcome where everyone wins in this situation.

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#TBT Adam Meakins on Manual Therapy The name Adam Meakins always causes a stir in the profession of Physiotherapy (Physical Therapy for us Yanks). We caught up with Adam last year at this time and wanted to bring back his thoughts on manual therapy. At the time that was the topic of discussion on the social media platforms and true to form Adam didn't hold back.



A year later Adam is actually facing some increased scrutiny from his UK governing body about his word selection on social media.



We hope for a great outcome where everyone wins in this situation.
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 34:36
The State of Rehab Therapy with WebPT’s Heidi Jannenga https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/08/07/the-state-of-rehab-therapy-with-webpts-heidi-jannenga/ Wed, 07 Aug 2019 10:00:38 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5714 WEB PT released it's 3rd annual "State of Rehab Therapy" insight. A 30+ page deep dive into statistics and insights from more than 6,000 responses across the profession. We caught up with Heidi and looked at the responses and trends that stood out from their report. Download the report for free here WEB PT released it’s 3rd annual “State of Rehab Therapy” insight. A 30+ page deep dive into statistics and insights from more than 6,000 responses across the profession.

We caught up with Heidi and looked at the responses and trends that stood out from their report.

Download the report for free here

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The State of Rehab Therapy with WebPT's Heidi Jannenga WEB PT released it's 3rd annual "State of Rehab Therapy" insight. A 30+ page deep dive into statistics and insights from more than 6,000 responses across the profession.



We caught up with Heidi and looked at the responses and trends that stood out from their report.



Download the report for free here
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 40:08
NPTE Structure & Scoring with Will Crane from PTFinalExam.com https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/08/06/npte-structure-scoring-with-will-crane/ Tue, 06 Aug 2019 10:00:34 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5775 Download free NPTE Flashcards: https://aureusmedical.com/nptestudycast.aspx Download free NPTE Flashcards: https://aureusmedical.com/nptestudycast.aspx

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NPTE Structure & Scoring with Will Crane Download free NPTE Flashcards: https://aureusmedical.com/nptestudycast.aspx
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 10:09
Ageism, Mental Health and BPPV OH MY! With Kathy Shirley https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/08/05/ageism-mental-health-and-bppv-oh-my-with-kathy-shirley/ Mon, 05 Aug 2019 10:27:40 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5670 We talked with Kathy Shirley who's been a PT for 38 YEARS! She's seen trends in PT come and go... and come back again. We talked about incorporating mental health coaching in her practice, how we might be a part of ageism internally and why we need to focus on treating BPPV no matter where we practice. The show is poured by Aureus Medical Staffing, if you want to jump into Travel PT find them at www.AureusMedical.com We talked with Kathy Shirley who’s been a PT for 38 YEARS! She’s seen trends in PT come and go… and come back again. We talked about incorporating mental health coaching in her practice, how we might be a part of ageism internally and why we need to focus on treating BPPV no matter where we practice.

The show is poured by Aureus Medical Staffing, if you want to jump into Travel PT find them at www.AureusMedical.com

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Ageism, Mental Health and BPPV OH MY! With Kathy Shirley We talked with Kathy Shirley who's been a PT for 38 YEARS! She's seen trends in PT come and go... and come back again. We talked about incorporating mental health coaching in her practice, how we might be a part of ageism internally and why we need to focus on treating BPPV no matter where we practice.



The show is poured by Aureus Medical Staffing, if you want to jump into Travel PT find them at www.AureusMedical.com
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 33:33
APTA Payment Update – Medicare Proposed Policy, Payment, and Quality Provisions Changes https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/08/03/apta-payment-update-medicare-proposed-policy-payment-and-quality-provisions-changes/ Sat, 03 Aug 2019 12:34:12 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5788 Kara Gainer and Heather Smith of the APTA talk us through proposed changes in Medicare payment structures and an update on MIPS. Kara Gainer and Heather Smith of the APTA talk us through proposed changes in Medicare payment structures and an update on MIPS.

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APTA Payment Update - Medicare Proposed Policy, Payment, and Quality Provisions Changes Kara Gainer and Heather Smith of the APTA talk us through proposed changes in Medicare payment structures and an update on MIPS.
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 23:27
Bob Rowe, Jamie Dyson & Joe Donnelly from the Brooks IHL Scholarly Symposium https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/07/29/bob-rowe-jamie-dyson-joe-donnelly-from-the-brooks-ihl-scholarly-symposium/ Mon, 29 Jul 2019 10:00:16 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5685 We talked with Bob Rowe who is the Executive Director of Brooks IHL at Brooks Rehabilitation located in Jacksonville, FL. In addition to developing and managing the current and future residency/fellowship programs within Brooks Rehabilitation, he assists in coordinating and promoting professional development opportunities for the Brooks clinical staff. Jamie Dyson has been an APTA member since 1988 and an FPTA member since 1992 when he moved to Florida from Boston. He received his BS in Physical Therapy from Northeastern University and his T-DPT from A.T. Still University. He has worked at Orlando Regional Medical Center (ORMC) since moving to Florida in the level 1 trauma center. He was a rehabilitationsupervisor for 20 over the orthopedic, trauma and cardiac centers with a specialty in intensive care and burns and has recently taken the position of rehabilitation educator. Joe Donnelly is a Clinical Professor and Director of Post-professional Education at Mercer University Department of Physical Therapy. He is an advocate for his patients and has served the profession for 35 years.  He was recently recognized as a GA Healthcare Hero by the Atlanta Business Chronicle for his role in elevating the level of practice of physical therapy in the state and adding over 40 board-certified specialists in orthopedic, neurologic and Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Physical Therapy. He is a strong influencer and catalyst for change at the grassroots level for the profession. We talked with Bob Rowe who is the Executive Director of Brooks IHL at Brooks Rehabilitation located in Jacksonville, FL. In addition to developing and managing the current and future residency/fellowship programs within Brooks Rehabilitation, he assists in coordinating and promoting professional development opportunities for the Brooks clinical staff.

Jamie Dyson has been an APTA member since 1988 and an FPTA member since 1992 when he moved to Florida from Boston. He received his BS in Physical Therapy from Northeastern University and his T-DPT from A.T. Still University. He has worked at Orlando Regional Medical Center (ORMC) since moving to Florida in the level 1 trauma center. He was a rehabilitation
supervisor for 20 over the orthopedic, trauma and cardiac centers with a specialty in intensive care and burns and has recently taken the position of rehabilitation educator.

Joe Donnelly is a Clinical Professor and Director of Post-professional Education at Mercer University Department of Physical Therapy. He is an advocate for his patients and has served the profession for 35 years.  He was recently recognized as a GA Healthcare Hero by the Atlanta Business Chronicle for his role in elevating the level of practice of physical therapy in the state and adding over 40 board-certified specialists in orthopedic, neurologic and Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Physical Therapy. He is a strong influencer and catalyst for change at the grassroots level for the profession.

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Bob Rowe, Jamie Dyson & Joe Donnelly from the Brooks IHL Scholarly Symposium We talked with Bob Rowe who is the Executive Director of Brooks IHL at Brooks Rehabilitation located in Jacksonville, FL. In addition to developing and managing the current and future residency/fellowship programs within Brooks Rehabilitation, he assists in coordinating and promoting professional development opportunities for the Brooks clinical staff.



Jamie Dyson has been an APTA member since 1988 and an FPTA member since 1992 when he moved to Florida from Boston. He received his BS in Physical Therapy from Northeastern University and his T-DPT from A.T. Still University. He has worked at Orlando Regional Medical Center (ORMC) since moving to Florida in the level 1 trauma center. He was a rehabilitationsupervisor for 20 over the orthopedic, trauma and cardiac centers with a specialty in intensive care and burns and has recently taken the position of rehabilitation educator.



Joe Donnelly is a Clinical Professor and Director of Post-professional Education at Mercer University Department of Physical Therapy. He is an advocate for his patients and has served the profession for 35 years.  He was recently recognized as a GA Healthcare Hero by the Atlanta Business Chronicle for his role in elevating the level of practice of physical therapy in the state and adding over 40 board-certified specialists in orthopedic, neurologic and Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Physical Therapy. He is a strong influencer and catalyst for change at the grassroots level for the profession.




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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 26:54
#TBT – Physical Therapy & Genomics with Dr. Mary Elizabeth Parker https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/07/25/tbt-physical-therapy-genomics-with-dr-mary-elizabeth-parker/ Thu, 25 Jul 2019 11:00:22 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5780 This is a #TBT episode from last year when we were live at the NEXT conference in Orlando Florida. We talked to Mary Elizabeth Parker who is a clinical associate professor at the Texas State PT program. We got into her presentation that year which talked about where the Physical Therapy profession comes into play on the topic of genomics. Mary's Bio: This is a #TBT episode from last year when we were live at the NEXT conference in Orlando Florida.

We talked to Mary Elizabeth Parker who is a clinical associate professor at the Texas State PT program.

We got into her presentation that year which talked about where the Physical Therapy profession comes into play on the topic of genomics.

Mary’s Bio:

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#TBT - Physical Therapy & Genomics with Dr. Mary Elizabeth Parker This is a #TBT episode from last year when we were live at the NEXT conference in Orlando Florida.



We talked to Mary Elizabeth Parker who is a clinical associate professor at the Texas State PT program.



We got into her presentation that year which talked about where the Physical Therapy profession comes into play on the topic of genomics.



Mary's Bio:








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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 17:38
PTJ Editor In Chief Alan Jette from the Brooks IHL Scholarly Symposium https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/07/24/ptj-editor-in-chief-alan-jette-from-the-brooks-ihl-scholarly-symposium/ Wed, 24 Jul 2019 10:00:08 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5683 Alan M. Jette, PT, PhD, MPH, FAPTA, is Professor of Interprofessional Studies in the PhD in Rehabilitation Sciences program and in the Department of Physical Therapy at the MGH Institute. He is also the editor-in-chief of Physical Therapy (PTJ), the scientific journal of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) as well as the host of the PTJ podcast. Dr. Jette is a physical therapist and an internationally recognized expert in the measurement of function and disability. He has developed numerous instruments that assess function and disability and has published numerous articles on these topics in the rehabilitation, geriatrics, and public health literature. Over the past 30 years, Dr. Jette has received a total of 54 grants and fellowships from such agencies as National Institutes of Health (multiple divisions), Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the National Arthritis Foundation. He also currently directs the Boston Rehabilitation Outcomes Measurement Center, funded by the NIH National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research. The center is a collaborative of local institutions that will provide rehabilitation researchers with the most up-to-date outcome measurement tools Alan M. Jette, PT, PhD, MPH, FAPTA, is Professor of Interprofessional Studies in the PhD in Rehabilitation Sciences program and in the Department of Physical Therapy at the MGH Institute. He is also the editor-in-chief of Physical Therapy (PTJ), the scientific journal of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) as well as the host of the PTJ podcast.

Dr. Jette is a physical therapist and an internationally recognized expert in the measurement of function and disability. He has developed numerous instruments that assess function and disability and has published numerous articles on these topics in the rehabilitation, geriatrics, and public health literature.

Over the past 30 years, Dr. Jette has received a total of 54 grants and fellowships from such agencies as National Institutes of Health (multiple divisions), Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the National Arthritis Foundation.

He also currently directs the Boston Rehabilitation Outcomes Measurement Center, funded by the NIH National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research. The center is a collaborative of local institutions that will provide rehabilitation researchers with the most up-to-date outcome measurement tools

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PTJ Editor In Chief Alan Jette from the Brooks IHL Scholarly Symposium Alan M. Jette, PT, PhD, MPH, FAPTA, is Professor of Interprofessional Studies in the PhD in Rehabilitation Sciences program and in the Department of Physical Therapy at the MGH Institute. He is also the editor-in-chief of Physical Therapy (PTJ), the scientific journal of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) as well as the host of the PTJ podcast.



Dr. Jette is a physical therapist and an internationally recognized expert in the measurement of function and disability. He has developed numerous instruments that assess function and disability and has published numerous articles on these topics in the rehabilitation, geriatrics, and public health literature.



Over the past 30 years, Dr. Jette has received a total of 54 grants and fellowships from such agencies as National Institutes of Health (multiple divisions), Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the National Arthritis Foundation.



He also currently directs the Boston Rehabilitation Outcomes Measurement Center, funded by the NIH National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research. The center is a collaborative of local institutions that will provide rehabilitation researchers with the most up-to-date outcome measurement tools
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 19:10
Telehealth in the Tri-State – Preseason to Postseason PT Perspectives with Alan Lee https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/07/24/telehealth-in-the-tri-state-preseason-to-postseason-pt-perspectives-with-alan-lee/ Wed, 24 Jul 2019 10:00:07 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5712 We talk with Alan Lee on Telehealth, where we are as a profession and where we're going (quickly). Alan is a professor of physical therapy at Mount Saint Mary's University with a research interest in Telehealth. Alan maintains clinical practice at Scripps Mercy Hospital in San Diego with dual board certifications in geriatrics and wound management. Alan will be presenting, amongst others, on Telehealth at the Tri-State Physical Therapy conference on October 11-13 2019 in Las Vegas Nevada. Ticket information can be found here We talk with Alan Lee on Telehealth, where we are as a profession and where we’re going (quickly).

Alan is a professor of physical therapy at Mount Saint Mary’s University with a research interest in Telehealth. Alan maintains clinical practice at Scripps Mercy Hospital in San Diego with dual board certifications in geriatrics and wound management.

Alan will be presenting, amongst others, on Telehealth at the Tri-State Physical Therapy conference on October 11-13 2019 in Las Vegas Nevada.

Ticket information can be found here

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Telehealth in the Tri-State - Preseason to Postseason PT Perspectives with Alan Lee We talk with Alan Lee on Telehealth, where we are as a profession and where we're going (quickly).



Alan is a professor of physical therapy at Mount Saint Mary's University with a research interest in Telehealth. Alan maintains clinical practice at Scripps Mercy Hospital in San Diego with dual board certifications in geriatrics and wound management.



Alan will be presenting, amongst others, on Telehealth at the Tri-State Physical Therapy conference on October 11-13 2019 in Las Vegas Nevada.



Ticket information can be found here




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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 25:27
Wanna come to the Tri State PT conference in Las Vegas? https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/07/22/wanna-come-to-the-tri-state-pt-conference-in-las-vegas/ Mon, 22 Jul 2019 20:39:42 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5777 We talked to 2 SPTs about the Tri-State PT conference coming up on October 11-13th in Las Vegas! Juliette Dassinger and Shivani Suklikar break down what's going on in Vegas during the conference. Important links! Win your way into the conference here: https://contest.app.do/vegas Information about the PTDOS Shoe Drive: https://empower.betherippl.com/rippl-sneaker-bag30411326 Register for the conference:California: https://staging-cpta.site-ym.com/page/TRI-StatePTConferenceArizona: https://aptaaz.org/events/2019/10/12/default-calendar/2019-fall-tri-state-conferenceNevada: https://www.nvapta.org/event/tristateconference We talked to 2 SPTs about the Tri-State PT conference coming up on October 11-13th in Las Vegas! Juliette Dassinger and Shivani Suklikar break down what’s going on in Vegas during the conference.

Important links!

Win your way into the conference here: https://contest.app.do/vegas

Information about the PTDOS Shoe Drive: https://empower.betherippl.com/rippl-sneaker-bag30411326

Register for the conference:
California: https://staging-cpta.site-ym.com/page/TRI-StatePTConference
Arizona: https://aptaaz.org/events/2019/10/12/default-calendar/2019-fall-tri-state-conference
Nevada: https://www.nvapta.org/event/tristateconference

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Wanna come to the Tri State PT conference in Las Vegas? We talked to 2 SPTs about the Tri-State PT conference coming up on October 11-13th in Las Vegas! Juliette Dassinger and Shivani Suklikar break down what's going on in Vegas during the conference.



Important links!



Win your way into the conference here: https://contest.app.do/vegas



Information about the PTDOS Shoe Drive: https://empower.betherippl.com/rippl-sneaker-bag30411326



Register for the conference:California: https://staging-cpta.site-ym.com/page/TRI-StatePTConferenceArizona: https://aptaaz.org/events/2019/10/12/default-calendar/2019-fall-tri-state-conferenceNevada: https://www.nvapta.org/event/tristateconference
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 15:28
Raine Osborne & Bill McGehee from the Brooks IHL Scholarly Symposium https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/07/22/raine-osborne-bill-mcgehee-from-the-brooks-ihl-scholarly-symposium/ Mon, 22 Jul 2019 10:00:34 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5681 We talked to Raine & Bill while at the Brooks IHL Scholarly Symposium in Jacksonville Florida. Raine is the Director of Research at Brooks Rehabilitation and Adjunct Faculty at the University of North Florida. He is also on faculty in the Brooks IHL Residency and Fellowship Program. He works to integrate clinical research and clinical practice, and doing what he can to help develop the next generation of clinical leaders. Bill is the Program Director for the DPT program at the University of Florida.   And serves the APTA as chair of the HoD Reference Committee for the 2020 HoD. We talked to Raine & Bill while at the Brooks IHL Scholarly Symposium in Jacksonville Florida.

Raine is the Director of Research at Brooks Rehabilitation and Adjunct Faculty at the University of North Florida. He is also on faculty in the Brooks IHL Residency and Fellowship Program. He works to integrate clinical research and clinical practice, and doing what he can to help develop the next generation of clinical leaders.

Bill is the Program Director for the DPT program at the University of Florida.   And serves the APTA as chair of the HoD Reference Committee for the 2020 HoD.

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Raine Osborne & Bill McGehee from the Brooks IHL Scholarly Symposium We talked to Raine & Bill while at the Brooks IHL Scholarly Symposium in Jacksonville Florida.



Raine is the Director of Research at Brooks Rehabilitation and Adjunct Faculty at the University of North Florida. He is also on faculty in the Brooks IHL Residency and Fellowship Program. He works to integrate clinical research and clinical practice, and doing what he can to help develop the next generation of clinical leaders.



Bill is the Program Director for the DPT program at the University of Florida.   And serves the APTA as chair of the HoD Reference Committee for the 2020 HoD.
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 26:26
Creating community in & around your practice with PT Josh Funk of Rehab2Perform https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/07/17/creating-community-in-around-your-practice-with-pt-josh-funk-of-rehab2perform/ Wed, 17 Jul 2019 10:00:28 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5676 We talked to Josh Funk and PT from Rehab2Perform about community and how he builds it in and around his clinic. We talked to Josh Funk and PT from Rehab2Perform about community and how he builds it in and around his clinic.

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Creating community in & around your practice with PT Josh Funk of Rehab2Perform We talked to Josh Funk and PT from Rehab2Perform about community and how he builds it in and around his clinic.
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 31:13
What to read to take your PT career to the next level with Brad Cooper, PT, MSPT, MBA, ATC https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/07/15/what-to-read-to-take-your-pt-career-to-the-next-level-with-brad-cooper-pt-mspt-mba-atc/ Mon, 15 Jul 2019 10:00:18 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5674 We talked with Brad Cooper who's been writing for the APTA for years now about a recent publication in APTA's Perspectives Magazine. He gave 10 book titles that helped to shape his career and gave insight for each on what they brought to him. Brad's Bio: Brad is a nationally-recognized thought leader in the health and wellness industry.  He is the author of four books, a Licensed Physical Therapist, Certified Athletic Trainer and highly sought-after speaker. Brad has been a lifelong student of, and catalyst for, optimal human performance. In his 20’s, he earned a Masters in Physical Therapy, which he used to treat patients across the spectrum of orthopedic/neurological diagnoses.  Then, in his 30’s, he earned an MBA, wrote three books, moved into a vice president of operations role and worked to expand upon his clinical leadership knowledge/understanding (while continuing to treat patients).  When Brad hit his 40’s, he became CEO of US Corporate Wellness, Co-founder of Catalyst Coaching Institute, wrote a fourth book and was generously identified by several publications as “The World’s Fittest CEO.”  Now in his 50’s, he continues his CEO role while simultaneously pursuing a PhD with research focusing on mental toughness and how it can be applied in the real world. Along the way, he’s fallen deeper in love with his bride of 27 years, treasured being a dad to three incredible kids, secured two US Patents, completed 11 Ironmans (4 times at Kona), won the Race Across America, been featured in a film shown nationwide and spoken professionally in all 50 states to a wide range of organizations.  We talked with Brad Cooper who’s been writing for the APTA for years now about a recent publication in APTA’s Perspectives Magazine.

He gave 10 book titles that helped to shape his career and gave insight for each on what they brought to him.

Brad’s Bio:

Brad is a nationally-recognized thought leader in the health and wellness industry.  He is the author of four books, a Licensed Physical Therapist, Certified Athletic Trainer and highly sought-after speaker.

Brad has been a lifelong student of, and catalyst for, optimal human performance. In his 20’s, he earned a Masters in Physical Therapy, which he used to treat patients across the spectrum of orthopedic/neurological diagnoses. 

Then, in his 30’s, he earned an MBA, wrote three books, moved into a vice president of operations role and worked to expand upon his clinical leadership knowledge/understanding (while continuing to treat patients). 

When Brad hit his 40’s, he became CEO of US Corporate Wellness, Co-founder of Catalyst Coaching Institute, wrote a fourth book and was generously identified by several publications as “The World’s Fittest CEO.” 

Now in his 50’s, he continues his CEO role while simultaneously pursuing a PhD with research focusing on mental toughness and how it can be applied in the real world. Along the way, he’s fallen deeper in love with his bride of 27 years, treasured being a dad to three incredible kids, secured two US Patents, completed 11 Ironmans (4 times at Kona), won the Race Across America, been featured in a film shown nationwide and spoken professionally in all 50 states to a wide range of organizations. 

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What to read to take your PT career to the next level with Brad Cooper, PT, MSPT, MBA, ATC We talked with Brad Cooper who's been writing for the APTA for years now about a recent publication in APTA's Perspectives Magazine.



He gave 10 book titles that helped to shape his career and gave insight for each on what they brought to him.



Brad's Bio:



Brad is a nationally-recognized thought leader in the health and wellness industry.  He is the author of four books, a Licensed Physical Therapist, Certified Athletic Trainer and highly sought-after speaker.



Brad has been a lifelong student of, and catalyst for, optimal human performance. In his 20’s, he earned a Masters in Physical Therapy, which he used to treat patients across the spectrum of orthopedic/neurological diagnoses. 



Then, in his 30’s, he earned an MBA, wrote three books, moved into a vice president of operations role and worked to expand upon his clinical leadership knowledge/understanding (while continuing to treat patients). 



When Brad hit his 40’s, he became CEO of US Corporate Wellness, Co-founder of Catalyst Coaching Institute, wrote a fourth book and was generously identified by several publications as “The World’s Fittest CEO.” 



Now in his 50’s, he continues his CEO role while simultaneously pursuing a PhD with research focusing on mental toughness and how it can be applied in the real world. Along the way, he’s fallen deeper in love with his bride of 27 years, treasured being a dad to three incredible kids, secured two US Patents, completed 11 Ironmans (4 times at Kona), won the Race Across America, been featured in a film shown nationwide and spoken professionally in all 50 states to a wide range of organizations. 




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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 27:28
What is clinical Informatics/Health Informatics w Stephanie Glick https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/07/12/what-is-clinical-informatics-health-informatics-w-stephanie-glick/ Fri, 12 Jul 2019 10:52:20 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5672 We get to the bottom of what clinical informatics and health informatics is and why Physical Therapist Stephanie Glick decided to shift her focus to where there as a Non-Clinical PT! Read more about Stephanie at the NonClincalPT.com here: https://thenonclinicalpt.com/clinical-informatics-specialist/ We get to the bottom of what clinical informatics and health informatics is and why Physical Therapist Stephanie Glick decided to shift her focus to where there as a Non-Clinical PT!

Read more about Stephanie at the NonClincalPT.com here: https://thenonclinicalpt.com/clinical-informatics-specialist/

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What is clinical Informatics/Health Informatics w Stephanie Glick We get to the bottom of what clinical informatics and health informatics is and why Physical Therapist Stephanie Glick decided to shift her focus to where there as a Non-Clinical PT!



Read more about Stephanie at the NonClincalPT.com here: https://thenonclinicalpt.com/clinical-informatics-specialist/
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 18:59
TBT – Graham Sessions Founders Interview w/ Steve, Drew & Patrick. https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/07/11/tbt-graham-sessions-founders-interview-w-steve-drew-patrick/ Thu, 11 Jul 2019 11:00:33 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5664 This throw back episode was recorded at the 10 year anniversary of the Graham Sessions - a small conference hosted by the APTA's Private Practice Section. The setting is a small group (about 150 attendees) where there is only ONE rule. What's said there can leave, but you can't attribute any comment, quote or idea to a person. The goal being that people can say what they want, without a filter and get ideas into the profession to start to change it from the inside. It was recorded live in San Diego with Co-Host Karen Litzy of the Healthy, Wealthy, & Smart podcast Listen to how this event got started from the founders of this super secret, possibly difficult to find, and definitely hard to explain Sessions for the 10th anniversary. We talk where we've been, where PT is headed, and the rules of Fight Club. PT Pintcast proudly poured by Aureus Medical. Travel & direct hire opportunities nationwide. This throw back episode was recorded at the 10 year anniversary of the Graham Sessions – a small conference hosted by the APTA’s Private Practice Section.

The setting is a small group (about 150 attendees) where there is only ONE rule. What’s said there can leave, but you can’t attribute any comment, quote or idea to a person.

The goal being that people can say what they want, without a filter and get ideas into the profession to start to change it from the inside.

It was recorded live in San Diego with Co-Host Karen Litzy of the Healthy, Wealthy, & Smart podcast

Listen to how this event got started from the founders of this super secret, possibly difficult to find, and definitely hard to explain Sessions for the 10th anniversary. We talk where we’ve been, where PT is headed, and the rules of Fight Club.

PT Pintcast proudly poured by Aureus Medical. Travel & direct hire opportunities nationwide.

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TBT - Graham Sessions Founders Interview w/ Steve, Drew & Patrick. This throw back episode was recorded at the 10 year anniversary of the Graham Sessions - a small conference hosted by the APTA's Private Practice Section.



The setting is a small group (about 150 attendees) where there is only ONE rule. What's said there can leave, but you can't attribute any comment, quote or idea to a person.



The goal being that people can say what they want, without a filter and get ideas into the profession to start to change it from the inside.



It was recorded live in San Diego with Co-Host Karen Litzy of the Healthy, Wealthy, & Smart podcast



Listen to how this event got started from the founders of this super secret, possibly difficult to find, and definitely hard to explain Sessions for the 10th anniversary. We talk where we've been, where PT is headed, and the rules of Fight Club.



PT Pintcast proudly poured by Aureus Medical. Travel & direct hire opportunities nationwide.
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 23:42
Are you contributing to #Ageism? with Jackie Osborne from Brooks IHL https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/07/10/are-you-contributing-to-ageism-with-jackie-osborne-from-brooks-ihl/ Wed, 10 Jul 2019 10:00:29 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5611 Are you contributing to #Ageism? with Jackie Osborne from Brooks IHL We were invited to the 4th annual Brooks IHL Scholarly Symposium in Jacksonville and got a chance to speak to Jackie Osborne who is part of their Geriatric Residency. We covered residency education, Ageism and a passion for documentation?! Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 16:48 #Unfiltered LIVE! @ CSM https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/07/08/unfiltered-live-csm/ Mon, 08 Jul 2019 11:00:43 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5598 #Unfiltered LIVE! @ CSM We went LIVE! @ CSM with three friends of the show in a chance for them to present while @ CSM, but do it without the filter that many presentations have to pass through.<br /> <br /> Megan Bellamy Brown of Mind the Mat<br /> Cole Galloway of Go Baby Go!<br /> and<br /> Tim Fox of Fox Rehabilitation Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 49:22 #TBT with Meg Lowry creator of the Clock Yourself app https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/07/04/tbt-with-meg-lowry-creator-of-the-clock-yourself-app/ Thu, 04 Jul 2019 10:00:44 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5633 #TBT with Meg Lowry creator of the Clock Yourself app A TBT episode w Meg Lowry, creator of Clock Yourself, attained her Bachelor of Physiotherapy in 2007 from the University of QLD, and her Master of Health Services Management from Griffith University in 2015.<br /> <br /> She has worked at Ipswich General Hospital, RBWH, Mater Mothers Hospital, Redlands Public Hospital and Metro South Aged Care Assessment Team.<br /> <br /> She has a breadth of experience in the sub-disciplines of acute cardiology, respiratory, gerontology, women’s health, outpatient and post-acute rehabilitation.<br /> <br /> The Clock Yourself methodology was designed by Brisbane physiotherapist Meg Lowry of Next Step Physio.<br /> <br /> Meg’s career goal is to tackle the undesirable conditions that we commonly associate with aging; dementia, falls, osteoporosis (and associated fractures), incontinence and prolapse. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 29:14 # XChangeSA w APTA Student Assembly https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/07/01/xchangesa-w-apta-student-assembly/ Mon, 01 Jul 2019 11:00:05 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5602 PT Pintcast host Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT was asked by the APTA's Student Assembly to take part in a Twitter XChange. He answered questions live about building your professional brand, communicating as a physical therapist and how and when to start learning your communication skills as a PT. PT Pintcast host Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT was asked by the APTA’s Student Assembly to take part in a Twitter XChange.

He answered questions live about building your professional brand, communicating as a physical therapist and how and when to start learning your communication skills as a PT.

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# XChangeSA w APTA Student Assembly Jimmy McKay was asked by the APTA's Student Assembly to talk about personal branding, but it wound up being a conversation about the basics of communications. Sending and receiving messages IS personal branding. Q&A from PT & PTA students with some good insights (since Jimmy was having an IPA during this chat). Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 57:32
ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/06/26/acl-injury-repeat-injury-in-youth-athletes-with-eric-elliot-greenburg/ Wed, 26 Jun 2019 10:54:08 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5596 ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg | 2 hrs ago 0:00 - 05:14 Hi, I'm Alexa. You can now hear PT podcast. Using me just say, hey Alexa, launched PT, pint cast, or you could be nice and try saying, please for lunch, what is being polite? Dead these days to your episodes, just say, hey Alexa, launch PT pint cast, maybe throw in a please. At the end my monitor the -tudents are they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that Cadillac in the clinic. Don't go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they're things that you don't necessarily jive with e that change. Bring the new culture two out there who, who may not know what is new in the research realm. So I really in power them to be that catalyst that change of the freshen taking your from the academic side of things into clinical practice. Get a chance to talk to the greenberg's. Eric in Elliot Greenberg. No relation. They had a couple of publications about ACL rehab and best practices. We. Best practices, but are those best practices being put into practice? So did there. So they took a look at it from an orthopedic surgeon perspective, physical therapist, perspective, and really, ultimately wanted to see why or why not those best practices were being actually utilized. So we took a talk with those two guys at the same time in this episode take a listen. I think it's got insights beyond just ACL rehab, right? Re really insights into where's the fall off in best practice to actual practice. So we're going to get into that with these guys episode brought to you by Owens recovery, science, a single source for PT's looking for certification in personalized blood flow, restriction rehabilitation training and the equipment, you need to apply in your clinical practice Zach Ephron on social media, just see. And he's going through ACL rehab, and using har-. So that's, that's kind of cool to see in the mainstream, and he did a little shout to his great physical therapist athletic trainers going through rehab. So check it out, Owens recovery science dot com. If you'd like to get certified. And grab that equipment, we do want to let you know, we have another podcast that's been launched. N. P T E, study cast, helping students study for the board exams. So check it out wherever podcast or heard. I tunes Google play Spotify. N P, T E, study cast, it is brought to you by our friends at Arias medical staffing without them. We wouldn't be able to bring it to you. We also have free downloadable study guides for each of the episodes short to the point episodes between three and nine minutes on average about the one hundred fifty most asked about path on the N P. So check that out. N P T study cast, now available ever podcast, hurt the best conversations happen at happy hour, welcome to hours forum award. This is the P T podcasts, here's your host, physical therapist, Jimmy MacKay the best conversations happen at happy hour. Welcome two hours your next episode of PT podcast starch right now bring it into to grow. Converge do not get confused. They are not related Elliott and Eric Greenberg. Welcome to the show guys. I'd give negative. Thanks. I have an excellent art. So we'll start with Elliott Elliott. What's, what's your background, which are the audience know about you about what, what you do in your daily life daily life? I've kind of limit role. I work at children's Philadelphia about three-quarters clinician, and about one quarter researcher here special interest in knee, and shoulder injuries particular ACL's, because what I see a lot of glad heavy Elliott and Eric. What's your superhero back story here, backdoor, the right now? I'm on Long Island and I may. In Europe, at the New York technology where I even the curriculum, it'd be program, but also treat the NYC athlete. And my current interest include working with obviously the population with lower injuries and running related injury. Excellent.

ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg | 2 hrs ago

0:00 – 05:14

Hi, I’m Alexa. You can now hear PT podcast. Using me just say, hey Alexa, launched PT, pint cast, or you could be nice and try saying, please for lunch, what is being polite? Dead these days to your episodes, just say, hey Alexa, launch PT pint cast, maybe throw in a please. At the end my monitor the -tudents are they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that Cadillac in the clinic. Don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with e that change. Bring the new culture two out there who, who may not know what is new in the research realm. So I really in power them to be that catalyst that change of the freshen taking your from the academic side of things into clinical practice. Get a chance to talk to the greenberg’s. Eric in Elliot Greenberg. No relation. They had a couple of publications about ACL rehab and best practices. We. Best practices, but are those best practices being put into practice? So did there. So they took a look at it from an orthopedic surgeon perspective, physical therapist, perspective, and really, ultimately wanted to see why or why not those best practices were being actually utilized. So we took a talk with those two guys at the same time in this episode take a listen. I think it’s got insights beyond just ACL rehab, right? Re really insights into where’s the fall off in best practice to actual practice. So we’re going to get into that with these guys episode brought to you by Owens recovery, science, a single source for PT’s looking for certification in personalized blood flow, restriction rehabilitation training and the equipment, you need to apply in your clinical practice Zach Ephron on social media, just see. And he’s going through ACL rehab, and using har-. So that’s, that’s kind of cool to see in the mainstream, and he did a little shout to his great physical therapist athletic trainers going through rehab. So check it out, Owens recovery science dot com. If you’d like to get certified. And grab that equipment, we do want to let you know, we have another podcast that’s been launched. N. P T E, study cast, helping students study for the board exams. So check it out wherever podcast or heard. I tunes Google play Spotify. N P, T E, study cast, it is brought to you by our friends at Arias medical staffing without them. We wouldn’t be able to bring it to you. We also have free downloadable study guides for each of the episodes short to the point episodes between three and nine minutes on average about the one hundred fifty most asked about path on the N P. So check that out. N P T study cast, now available ever podcast, hurt the best conversations happen at happy hour, welcome to hours forum award. This is the P T podcasts, here’s your host, physical therapist, Jimmy MacKay the best conversations happen at happy hour. Welcome two hours your next episode of PT podcast starch right now bring it into to grow. Converge do not get confused. They are not related Elliott and Eric Greenberg. Welcome to the show guys. I’d give negative. Thanks. I have an excellent art. So we’ll start with Elliott Elliott. What’s, what’s your background, which are the audience know about you about what, what you do in your daily life daily life? I’ve kind of limit role. I work at children’s Philadelphia about three-quarters clinician, and about one quarter researcher here special interest in knee, and shoulder injuries particular ACL’s, because what I see a lot of glad heavy Elliott and Eric. What’s your superhero back story here, backdoor, the right now? I’m on Long Island and I may. In Europe, at the New York technology where I even the curriculum, it’d be program, but also treat the NYC athlete. And my current interest include working with obviously the population with lower injuries and running related injury. Excellent. So how’d you guys meet anyway? I mean I know you know Elliott, you’re, you’re at shop Philly. Eric, you’re in New York. But have you guys cross paths was was it the same conference and picked up the others name tag because you both have the same last name or what? Yeah, it’s kind of a long story, but. I we unknowingly you know, kinda sorta cross paths, a long time in our in our in our lives together. But we, we did end up. We worked together at shop for a little while. And that’s really how he really got. No each other and work together, and kinda, formerly Egypt. So both of you guys have special interests in lower shrimp, the injuries Elliott working with pediatric and adolescent, sportsmed. Eric doing the same with some college athletes, and being a practicing as well. How did you guys decide to get together and do some research, and then we’ll get into what it was and where the audience can find it. Burqa started on the research paths together while we were together at shop. We did come out with a more retrospective analysis looking at the pediatric strengthen front-row, turn in the pediatric athlete, and then it kind of bird into a little more while, and I remember very closely when Elliott our standing next to each other at CSM, how long it was it remember that in California, I think, when whenever the Anaheim yeah, yeah.

05:15 – 10:04

Book that we has had this idea like, you know, we’re coming out with all these recognitions, but we really don’t know what it is that peaky are actually doing out there in terms of whites, specifically, a C L rehab returned to play return to sport return to life. Yeah. So when we were working together at shop, we do a lot of these functional and strength testing on patients that we weren’t really seeing. And when we were talking to them while they while they were coming in. You were getting again, gambit whole gambit as far as what they were doing regarding every in along with what kind of critique. Syrian that they’re, they’re practicing teachers were using this got us to thinking about, you know, yes, there are recommendations and guidelines out there, but is there that much variability out there in nickel practice? Gotcha. So you’re seeing what all the research was, and that’s what you’re doing at CSM, but you’re saying what’s actually being done, what where’s, where’s the translation? What’s the hand off from research and best practices to what’s actually being done with athletes? Yeah, I think yeah. And I think it also kind of reverse too, because we had that kinda unique experience at shop. Where are surging kind of require their patients to come the are there teams are to make sure they are functional testing program, where they the L part of that is, it’s great because we get interacted patient that we’re not treating on a day-to-day basis, we’re seeing at three months post op or six months and saying, all right. Tell me what you’re doing. And we hear from the patient’s perspective, are they are they following of, like, what we would consider to be best practice guidelines what have they done? Maybe prior to come. In and the patient, assessing aunts. And then, and then we give to CSM we hear what all this really great research is saying, man, we should be doing. We should be doing more. We shouldn’t do, and it’s like, but, you know, the, the patients that we have coming in from outside, our walls, or maybe not even doing happened that too. So it’s like, you know, it really spurred that idea what, what happened was the general practitioner that seeing, you know, maybe mostly maybe low back pain, or older patients when they get kind of SEAL that walkner door, you know, that they may not be a specialist in these the what is what does that person doing to make decisions about returns person, the play I like how it was formulated, organically, guys standing there together at, at CSM and saying, hey, what about this? Why don’t we take a look at the cool part was you guys went and follow through, and you wind up doing it. So, so talk about what happened next after that moment, when you actually follow through, we kind of formulated the idea, and we brought together, what we’ve dealt with a really good team, people with orthopedic surgeons that we work with here at job, and in PT’s, and we kinda got the, the survey. Of what we wanted to the question that we wanted to ask formulated together. And then we thought, hey, great idea, not only look at what therapists are doing. But on the other side, we look at the PD surgeon, they’re doing as well. So he came up with this idea of maybe the three sixty degrees, scope of people that are involved in, in these rehab decision, seeing what if kind of the Philip how to be in the orthopedic surgeons are kind of the overall directors, they’re the ones that are delivering the protocols for their patients. And, you know, saying this is what should be done. You know, we should see what they think about package patterns TT’s, or the one we’re in the trenches were the ones that actually were applying testing. But we feel should be best. You know what is what the P T say we wanted to kind of see what are both sides would say. And then maybe the compare contrast and draw conclusions from that. Unlike the more like a time line and being able to see again, what’s, what’s best practice. That’s great. But what’s actually being done on both ends in terms of the orthopedic surgeons and then the follow through with the, the physical therapists after? The surgery. So, so how’d you guys approach it and, and what you guys fine. Let’s get into the nitty gritty yet for one of the biggest things that we found was that there was a large variability, not physical therapist, but also with the orthopedic surgeon, and I think it really probably under floors, or underestimates, the ability out there, because the sample that we took from was the sports section with exception in private practice section, or what formerly known as those sections, I should say with their new name changes. But it’s a pretty, if you think about it a homogeneous sample of people, you would think that would be in the know of the current landscape of the literature, who would probably under floors, or under made the, the true, very villi out there similarly that we, we found even more variety in the orthopedic population, certain population, and that was the sample of pediatric orthopedic surgeon from the research and sports medicine group prison. Group, once again, a very homogeneous sample that tends to be a little bit more up to date with their with their current recommendation. So we, we were, we were quite quick deprived prize, the degree of Billy that we found, so, so I just want to stop you there to make sure I understand what you’re saying, and make sure the audience gets it too.

10:04 – 15:09

So you’re saying this groups free homogeneous you figured it, would they be more well informed because these are the people who go out of their way to not only be members but to be section or academy members and seek out the research, so they should have been sticking to or at least be closer to the best practice guidelines that have been put forth so far. But you saw variability, which you’re saying really really, really highlights how much variability was out there that you couldn’t even reach at xactly yet. Okay. I just didn’t wanna make sure I, I want to make sure I understood that. So it’s okay that is that is pretty telling what were some of the results you want to get into some of the some of the highlights. And some of the things that you guys found that maybe surprise you or didn’t surprise you. If you think about the decision. Making profits or what you’re the tools. You’re using from, from time based parameters to some type of strength criteria to some type of stumps performance measure to maybe some type of patient outcome measure or psychological attachment or contract dry. I mean, the variation existed across all of those, but even some of the more kind of would you consider maybe more concrete things like time we’re not even agreeing on time when the progress patience right now and you think that there’s probably the better most amount of research looking to support like those simple those, those type of concrete things. But we can’t even agree. And then when you start drilling down into the details about well, are reassessing strength and a lot of everybody agreed like. Yeah. Strength is important. But then we asked, how are you assessing strength that then variability just started from there? Right. And some people there was a large proportion of the sample PT’s that, you know, just relied on manual muscle testing to progress their patients and kind of what the literature showing is that, you know, we’re not going to be able to. Identify these higher levels of gases. Pete that may exist for these patients, when they’re strong but they’re just not strong enough using now montage, tonight’s lesion. But then when people are using either more objective measures, like handle their no mama tree. Or there’s availability rice the testing the standard that which they’re holding them to the variability just continues to progress where some people required seventy five percent. Maybe limbs imaging index and some people were maybe above one hundred percent. It’s there’s just, you know, the organizer surprised they as we drill down. You know, the win the details of what we’re doing and everyday practice, we can agree on broad strokes. We can agree that strengthening important, the man when you start like measuring strength like how you’re actually applying and doing that. That’s really different from everybody. Do you see in the framework is there? But how you actually apply and actually measure things like time or strength, which everyone pretty much agrees on being important factors to take into consideration when you start. Looking even smaller there. That’s where you see even more the very variability come into play. Yeah. Yeah. Eric, what do you want more like the devil? That was in the house a little bit like he talked to finishing tonight and nobody’s gonna argue that strength that meet strength. This is not going to be important. But I think once you start to, to hammer down on to power, they testing or something the strength of, of, of their patients. Are you really comparing apples to apples when when you start to go across different clinics, clinician and patients? And I think it really does create a little bit confusion, not just in the PT population in the clinic population. But Auckland patients to talk with one another, when they’re like, oh, yeah. I think cleared how they took your or yeah, they, they hooked me up to this machine four times. And, and I have to get at least ninety cent and the other person’s like oh, I’ve never done that before. And they’re back on the field plan already. I think it really does create a little bit of confusion within the society as well as are we really treating the same patients across different clinicians in clinic. And practitioners in the same profession. You know, right. That’s and that’s a great example of when you get to patients together, and they say, oh, we have the same injury, we must have done the same type of rehab, or at least hit these big big benchmarks. And when they’re different that’s confusing. And again, I get it, you know, patients are different from patient to patient. But if this is what best practices are, how come there’s so much variability? What were you able to hone in and either measure and ask, or at least if not speculate? Why is it? Why, why do we take it upon ourselves to, to have so much variability within the PT arm of the survey that we thought he’d be able to get one of those details? We, we tried to look at commision doctor that maybe influenced some of their him their decision that the us. So we had we kind of broke people down into, like either, high volume or low volume practitioners, where we said, anybody that treated more than ten miles per year. We accounted for them at high volume. Actitities and those less than that were low volume. We looked at certified specialists versus not certified specialists. And we don’t think years of clinical experience, and you know, if we if we use, we don’t know what that program is or, you know, like like you said, a few times we have our current, you know, Beth standard that we have our practice standard.

15:09 – 20:08

But we know if those are ideal hopefully change as we continue to learn more. But if we lived up to characteristics of the clinicians relative to the decision, they were making it seem like certified specialists were more likely to follow either which beat, of course, board certified specialists more likely to follow those kind of current practice guideline, and also those clinicians that were that were into our high volume clinicians seem to kind of follow more those best practice standards. So jor Beth is kind of what we’ve only result is that meeting. Those conditions are maybe more tied into the current literature or maybe by into the current literature more maybe see the investment in their practice going out. Of the way there, that’s a self selected group, which we started talking about the top of the show. These are people who say when your SAS, or when you’re seeing high volume, I’m I better, I better be doing the best because I’m practices wise because I’m seeing so many of these types of patients, these specific type of patients each and every year variability in terms of testing, I could imagine sometimes would have to do with ability of Quebec. Right. Each practice setting is going to be different. Yeah, definitely. And I think Becky him about a up in some of our speculation that people that had can be high volume a, you know, probably see the investment in an economic Donna, Mamata, or even like a handheld on a monitor roof with someone who may maybe in a facility where they’re not being as many of those types of patients may not be willing to invest in something because there’s no cost benefit for them or return on their investment in the long term. And obviously, there are other financial issues that you come across. Basis issues potentially. So I think there’s a lot of confounding issues that could arrive that can reason why someone is not using this type of instrumentation where can work in the audience, find this and, and download and kind of consumer themselves want to make sure they get access to it. Yes. The PTA survey published in jail at BT in October issue. Twenty eighteen and me surge in order big surgeon arm of the study was just published last month on in the orthopedic journalist sports medicine, Zingo them, and you can download that, that’s a full tech there, you can download full text there. No problem. What, what was the what was some of the attitudes of people who participated in this after the, the results will reveal work were they shocked were they surprised to were they, you know, pledging to, to change their practice because they saw such variability or anything come out of that, you know, I don’t think it was that surprising. I think I think disturbing survey kinda showed what everybody coming, Verdy thought. Victor knew existed that there’s variation out there and everyone’s like, wow, I, I knew it was variable. But I didn’t think it was very -able. You know what I think that was kind of, like just reinforced them the some of the thoughts, we did get a couple of emails from people like saying, hey, this is this is really nice really enjoyed remiss kinda good study, but I don’t know air and different Binyamin that no you know what it was interesting. I think you’ve gotta lar- a lot of publicity on social media platforms almost like the like a shock value of you need to do better. You know, by no means do I think you are. Is it is it bulletproof is it the best thing out there? Is it catching all people who may be at risk? But, but at least it’s the best we have at this point. But it seems if people aren’t even doing that at this point. So how could we really say that it’s not doing what it claims to be doing? If people aren’t there aren’t really doing it. So I think it, it really gained some headway on, on the media platform of saying, hey guys, let’s do a little bit better out there. I like that good. Take a quick break want to thank our sponsors are east medical staffing for keeping the show on the air. They find jobs, whether you’re gonna do so Adelphia or Long Island or anywhere you want to do a beach a lake. He wanna go mountains. He want to ski you can do that. That’s the cool part of variability in our in our profession is people need PT all over. So go do what you want where you want to do it. And Arias get you set up a U, R, E US, medical dot com. Not only just having the positions. But as well as being with a walkie through all the pain points. What do I do if I’m licensed in New York? But I want to go work in California for a couple of months they’ve got people on board to help you walk you through that. So you’re not on your own housing. How do you find where to live and is the person that use hiring you? They pay for that. They’ve got someone to walk you through that as well. The thing that could knit freaked me out the most was taxes. If you live in New York, but you’re temporarily working in Colorado. What do you do again? Arias has someone for that as well. So check them out, if you want to do a short term placement or look into relocate long-term, a U, R, E US medical dot com. Where, where would you guys go if you could go anywhere in the fifty states, if you do exactly what you wanna do what state, haven’t you been to that? You would give shot for thirteen weeks.

20:09 – 25:05

What bait haven’t I been to? Well, I was thinking more of that. I have been to Florida gator, we go down to Pensacola Beach, Florida every odd year for a week, and that is one of my favorite places in the United States. But opera played the haven’t been to having not ally. They had not been there, I would probably pick some somewhere in the mountain bikers aggo could Pacific northwest. Well at school party where the fifty states check him out. You are US medical dot com. Extent stay tuned. The we’ll be right back to the P T on cast. If you look at for education passed your physical therapy degree, look no further than Brooks. H L, Brooks rehabilitation institute of higher learning you could find out more Brooks, I h l dot org continuing education along with residencies and fellowships residencies in Orthopaedics, geriatrics, women’s health, neurologic PT, pediatrics, sports, and fellowship opportunity as well. So look into it if you’re looking to expand your knowledge base Brooks, IHL dot org to the typecast with Jimmy MacKay question. How was the how are the views or how was the reaction you guys mentioned, some kind of shock value on on social media saying, hey, come almost a rallying cry. But we, we need to do better. Let’s do better. Was there any reaction from the orthopedic surgeons since they’re the kind of the first touch point in the patient, and then they pass them off to us betcha they expect us to be doing best practices? What was their reaction to the results? I haven’t seen much reaction to the there’s a lot more talk about it and probably considerable Eric. And I of fly in within the realm when we did present it that at conference. We got a lot of really good feedback. We actually won best paper award at the prison conference the year, we did present this at that conference. I think there was there was a lot of kind of good Baillieu in, in the in the paper and the topics. And you know, we’re hoping that maybe it’s going to help drive Johnston change where beating side and change things around to so, so, so alternately. I guess the question to ask, is how do we do better? You know, we have these academies, now we specialize, we have best practices is there anything that you would that you, if you could make may wave. Magic wand that you put into play. How can we do better? I did a residency at the. I did a residency at the at the university of Delaware did for threatens there under the guidance of insider macadear who’s been acute advocate for the tests. You know, you need to test the folk and there’s been research out there that said, don’t, don’t need an kind of garner monitor to assess quad strikes you all you need is in the extension, machine that every clinic was throwing out a few years back and now the starting to get them out of the trash. So I think it comes down to, you know what take the time out. It’s worth your while for the information that you get just to do repetition, maximum testing if that’s all you have is you have a handheld item ometer, you use both types of testing, but I think it’s taking the time out and maybe sacrificing other parts of your of your treatment to really get the data that you need to make educated decisions. And that’s a valuable thing, right? Giving up some time. But if if, if what you’re presenting his is correct, which we, we would assume that would be since its best practices that time is well, spent, we’ll we’re going to say sorry to cut you off yet. I agree. I think engage in this conversation is actually helpful in getting some of the some of that social media. No on your your, your show. You’ve talked about kind of lag time between evidence to trickle down everyday practice. And I think that the social media conversations really helpful with and they can push us that people probably wouldn’t have picked up the paper or read it beforehand. And there’s there’s so much stuff about about ACL coming out. I mean I mean hundreds of papers every year to try and I get that. But I think trying to just these maybe maybe helped reinforce some of this, you know, the current standard that we think are the best to try to help, you know, get that out to general practitioners that don’t specialize an easy else, but probably Seeven majority of easy L patients because they make up the majority of the general practices that are out there, and maybe helping to adopt you know, the doctor and the guidelines that are that are being put forward. We’ll look at Alex, look the positive at least there are best practices, right? And we’re pushing we’re pushing up professor. Towards finding out what is best that’s great. That’s a great problem to have is. How do we know? How are we going to disseminate that and make sure it gets put into play? At least we got that first part least, we’re really, really paying attention to the first part. Now, if we as you just mentioned, continue to have those conversations, maybe hopefully it’ll help that second part with this emanation last thing. I wanted to ask Eric, you’ve got a unique situation in terms of, of working with students any strategies to encourage students and new clinicians to adopting best practices, and making the change in current practice patterns, to hopefully as they progress in their careers continue that and then teach other students to change the profession.

25:05 – 30:18

Yeah. You know, I had as a an instructor in professor at this point, I tend to utilize a lot of media and podcasts, some of your own actually and other types of logs and things like that after screen through them with my Hyun because I feel like it’s very powerful to hear it from the door at both. So more. Digestible for them than reading the text books. Hearing me talk about it up there. So I utilize that empowers them to get engaged in conversation with the people who are actually putting out literature, and the people who do have experience aside from hearing it from myself as a sage on the stage. I also my mantra to the students are you know they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that, that, that catalyst in the clinic, don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with he that change. Bring the new culture two who’ve been out there who, who may not know what, what is new in the research realm. So I, I really encountered them to be that catalyst that change of the profession, taking it from out of the academic side of things into clinical practice love it. Be the change. Right. It’s not gonna change unless you take what you exactly what it is take what you learn in school, and your clinical rotations and actually, start to do it love that last. Part of the show is the parting shot. It is the parting shot. The Portland shot is brought to you by rock tape more than just the tape company. Rock tape is a movement company, tools and education for medical professionals, if you look at it help, your patients, go stronger longer. Checkout rock tape dot com. You guys have an opportunity to leave one one sentiment with the audience before you go who wants to go first with their partying shop Erica, you kick it off that. All right. So, I guess my parting dot would probably be addictive. Festive, we could do with younger. Patients is its neck with them understand that they’re not an eight the pair, their person who had an affair, and in dealing with kids and dealing with adults. You know you need to manage each person’s differently by using the evidence as your guide, but understanding that you need to tell about intimate independence to the person. And if you could just connect with that person, you’re, you’re, you’re gonna make that person better, regardless of, of. What you do as long as you’re you’re, you’re letting Evan guide you love at Elliot. You’re up and parting shot when he got I think just making sure you continue to grow as a clinician, you know, I think seeing a lot of as the ovation in unfortunately thing, a lot of them hail or have re injury or or secondary injury has has driven me to want to get better. You know. And I think just kind of continuing to grow as condition, and, and, and use those, those events or in that let learning to, to better yourself for the next person around is, is an important thing love that before we go. I’m just you. You’re prescribing podcast episodes, as homework or is outside learning to students love to hear that. I am. I and actually I get made fun of by my other faculty members because of it. But obviously, I listen to a lot of them my forehand. I don’t just give it to them, but I feel like it’s a lot more digestible for them. They can do it while they’re driving into school. They could do it while they’re working out. So. They can work it into their, their everyday life. And it also brings them. They stumble upon other things within that podcast. And it’s more student directed learning after that because they’re like, oh, I listen to this on certain podcast. And then I saw another episode that I was in it really interests me. So it starts to get them on that self directed learning which which is so important for when they do graduate is, how do they, you know, now the information coming to them, they have to go out and seek it? So it teaches them that new skill. You know, selfishly a love to hear that because I host a couple of different podcasts. But I like it because as the as the guy with a degree in communications you’re talking or you’re trying to facilitate a conversation, the way your audience listens. And you’re listening the way your audience talks, and that’s a way to facilitate great conversation instead of what you mentioned earlier being the sage on the stage. That’s a presentation. Right. Some people do learn really well from presentation myself, I’m a conversation guy, obviously. So, you know, selfishly hey, love love to hear that. You’re prescribing assigning podcast episodes, maybe one or two for my show to students, but just love the fact that you’re open to and Anna do want to highlight you mentioned it twice that you do screen through that. Anybody with a microphone create a podcast super easy. But I love the fact that you’re screening it and highlighting. Hey, pay attention to this, and they do after that, if they trip across an episode that hasn’t been screened they need to take that upon themselves because there’s a lot of information in less than great information out there to. Absolutely. I think that’s the most important thing. Is that you’re, you’re, you’re really screening through it to make sure because there’s a lot of stuff out there, that, that maybe you doesn’t really job with the intentions of, of what you want them to get to learn and last point, I’ll make love that too, because once they graduate, they don’t have a professor down the hall or they aren’t running into someone each and every week.

30:19 – 32:32

We’re having that information brought to them, they need to start to seek it out. And think, you know, handing over day of a blog to read or. Podcast, listen to or video channel follow. That’s a great digestible way as we mentioned before, of getting information. Once you start working forty hours a week when you graduate gentlemen, want to say thanks very much for your time. Don’t think it will be the last one. We have you guys on the show, but etc. Service episode with everybody. On the P T cast is a product of p t pint cast LLC it is hosted and produced by p t podcasts. EEO Jim McKay, and CBO sky, Donovan from Marymount university, we talk PT, drink, beer, and record it this has been another poor from the PT pint cast the PD podcasts in ten for educational purposes. Only no clinical decision making should be based solely on one source while Perez, taken to ensure accuracy, factual errors can be present. More on the show at PT podcasts dot com. We’re home on the internet t-, pine cast dot com created by build PT. Build PT provides marketing services, specifically for private practice, PT’s website, development and hosted inviting content marketing solutions PT clinics across the country. See with good PT can do for you. Today dot com. The PT pint cast proudly supports the Travis mills foundation on April tenth twenty twelve United States army staff sergeant Travis mills of the eighty second airborne was critically injured on his third tour of duty in Afghanistan by while on patrol losing portions of both legs, and both arms. He is one of only five quadruple amputees from the wars in Iraq, and Afghanistan to survive his injuries, thanks to his amazing strength, courage, and incredible will to live the heroic actions of the men in his unit. The prayers of thousands and all the healthcare providers at the Walter Reed Army medical center. Travis remains on the road to recovery. He founded the Travis mills foundation, a nonprofit organization formed to benefit and assist. Combat injured. Teran’s. Travis lives by his motto never give up. Never quit to support the Travis mills foundation. Or to find out more visit Travis mills dot org.

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ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg We talk with Eric & Elliot Greenburg (no relation) about ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes.<br /> <br /> Topics hit:<br /> <br /> High rates of ACL injury and repeat injury among youth/adolescent athletes.<br /> <br /> Recent publications of ours that identifying variability of rehabilitation methods in determination of progression of activity following ACL reconstruction among physical therapists and orthopedic surgeons<br /> <br /> Controversy regarding what criteria "should" be used to help determine rehab progression, including return to sports among this population. Translating evidence into practice, which is not occurring according to our survey results. <br /> <br /> How can we optimize rehabilitation in a world of managed care, escalating copays and high deductible insurance plans. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 32:32
USA Wheelchair Rugby Paralympian Chuck Aoki https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/06/24/usa-wheelchair-rugby-paralympian-chuck-aoki/ Mon, 24 Jun 2019 10:59:20 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5566 USA Wheelchair Rugby Paralympian Chuck Aoki We were thrilled to talk with USA Wheelchair Rugby Paralympian Chuck Aoki about the games, what being a Paralympian means to him, some insights of the game of Wheelchair Rugby and where the game and the Paralympics are headed Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 29:24 E-Stim Rap – Contraindications & Precautions https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/06/20/e-stim-contraindications-precautions/ Thu, 20 Jun 2019 15:00:31 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5605 Download free study guides from Aureus Medical Staffing here: https://www.aureusmedical.com/nptestudycast.aspx Download free study guides from Aureus Medical Staffing here: https://www.aureusmedical.com/nptestudycast.aspx

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E-Stim Contraindications & Precautions E-Stim Contraindications & Precautions by DPT_Capers Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 1:51
Cole Galloway & Andrina Sabet. Where’s GO Baby GOing next? https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/06/20/cole-galloway-andrina-sabet-wheres-go-baby-going-next/ Thu, 20 Jun 2019 11:44:18 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5594 Cole Galloway & Andrina Sabet. Where's GO Baby GOing next? We talk to Cole Galloway and Andrina Sabet about whatever is on their mind. This time it's where Go Baby Go is and is going but also what's next in that space? Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 41:31 TelehealthPT from Down Under Trevor Russell & Dr. Nicole Hartley from University of Queensland https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/06/17/telehealthpt-from-down-under-trevor-russell-dr-nicole-hartley-from-university-of-queensland/ Mon, 17 Jun 2019 11:55:51 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5564 TelehealthPT from Down Under Trevor Russell & Dr. Nicole Hartley from University of Queensland We sat down for a few beers with Trevor Russell & Dr. Nicole Hartley from University of Queensland and talked about their studies and work in the field of Telehealth in the profession of Physiotherapy Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 31:59 Survive the NPTE with our Top 10 list with PT Final Exam – Will Crane – #TBT Episode https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/06/13/survive-the-npte-with-our-top-10-list-with-pt-final-exam-will-crane-tbt-episode/ Thu, 13 Jun 2019 10:00:33 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5588 Survive the NPTE with our Top 10 list with PT Final Exam - Will Crane - #TBT Episode We talk to Will Crane of PTFinalExam.com and he gives us his TOP TEN list on things to know for the NPTE. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 33:39 Shoes for Kids at NEXT 2019 with Brad Thuringer https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/06/09/shoes-for-kids-at-next-2019-with-brad-thuringer/ Sun, 09 Jun 2019 16:22:32 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5585 Shoes for Kids at NEXT 2019 with Brad Thuringer We talk with Brad Thuringer, a PTA educator from South Dakota who started a movement called Shoes 4 Kids that's not supported by the APTA. It began 14 years ago and has since donated more than 15,000 pairs of shoes to those who need them. He does this drive for new shoes around APTA's NEXT conference each year in that cities local community. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 19:04 Non-Clinical PT spotlight – Program Administrator with Lauren Kealy https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/06/09/innovation-virtual-health-with-lauren-kealy/ Sun, 09 Jun 2019 10:15:02 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5572 We talk to Lauren Kealy who's a Non-Clinical PT. She is a health care strategist... we get to figure out what THAT means and take a further look into the world of PTs working in non-clinical roles. Check out her full article here: https://thenonclinicalpt.com/healthcare-strategist-lauren-kealy/ from www.TheNonclinicalPT.com

ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg | 2 hrs ago

0:00 – 05:14

Hi, I’m Alexa. You can now hear PT podcast. Using me just say, hey Alexa, launched PT, pint cast, or you could be nice and try saying, please for lunch, what is being polite? Dead these days to your episodes, just say, hey Alexa, launch PT pint cast, maybe throw in a please. At the end my monitor the -tudents are they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that Cadillac in the clinic. Don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with e that change. Bring the new culture two out there who, who may not know what is new in the research realm. So I really in power them to be that catalyst that change of the freshen taking your from the academic side of things into clinical practice. Get a chance to talk to the greenberg’s. Eric in Elliot Greenberg. No relation. They had a couple of publications about ACL rehab and best practices. We. Best practices, but are those best practices being put into practice? So did there. So they took a look at it from an orthopedic surgeon perspective, physical therapist, perspective, and really, ultimately wanted to see why or why not those best practices were being actually utilized. So we took a talk with those two guys at the same time in this episode take a listen. I think it’s got insights beyond just ACL rehab, right? Re really insights into where’s the fall off in best practice to actual practice. So we’re going to get into that with these guys episode brought to you by Owens recovery, science, a single source for PT’s looking for certification in personalized blood flow, restriction rehabilitation training and the equipment, you need to apply in your clinical practice Zach Ephron on social media, just see. And he’s going through ACL rehab, and using har-. So that’s, that’s kind of cool to see in the mainstream, and he did a little shout to his great physical therapist athletic trainers going through rehab. So check it out, Owens recovery science dot com. If you’d like to get certified. And grab that equipment, we do want to let you know, we have another podcast that’s been launched. N. P T E, study cast, helping students study for the board exams. So check it out wherever podcast or heard. I tunes Google play Spotify. N P, T E, study cast, it is brought to you by our friends at Arias medical staffing without them. We wouldn’t be able to bring it to you. We also have free downloadable study guides for each of the episodes short to the point episodes between three and nine minutes on average about the one hundred fifty most asked about path on the N P. So check that out. N P T study cast, now available ever podcast, hurt the best conversations happen at happy hour, welcome to hours forum award. This is the P T podcasts, here’s your host, physical therapist, Jimmy MacKay the best conversations happen at happy hour. Welcome two hours your next episode of PT podcast starch right now bring it into to grow. Converge do not get confused. They are not related Elliott and Eric Greenberg. Welcome to the show guys. I’d give negative. Thanks. I have an excellent art. So we’ll start with Elliott Elliott. What’s, what’s your background, which are the audience know about you about what, what you do in your daily life daily life? I’ve kind of limit role. I work at children’s Philadelphia about three-quarters clinician, and about one quarter researcher here special interest in knee, and shoulder injuries particular ACL’s, because what I see a lot of glad heavy Elliott and Eric. What’s your superhero back story here, backdoor, the right now? I’m on Long Island and I may. In Europe, at the New York technology where I even the curriculum, it’d be program, but also treat the NYC athlete. And my current interest include working with obviously the population with lower injuries and running related injury. Excellent. So how’d you guys meet anyway? I mean I know you know Elliott, you’re, you’re at shop Philly. Eric, you’re in New York. But have you guys cross paths was was it the same conference and picked up the others name tag because you both have the same last name or what? Yeah, it’s kind of a long story, but. I we unknowingly you know, kinda sorta cross paths, a long time in our in our in our lives together. But we, we did end up. We worked together at shop for a little while. And that’s really how he really got. No each other and work together, and kinda, formerly Egypt. So both of you guys have special interests in lower shrimp, the injuries Elliott working with pediatric and adolescent, sportsmed. Eric doing the same with some college athletes, and being a practicing as well. How did you guys decide to get together and do some research, and then we’ll get into what it was and where the audience can find it. Burqa started on the research paths together while we were together at shop. We did come out with a more retrospective analysis looking at the pediatric strengthen front-row, turn in the pediatric athlete, and then it kind of bird into a little more while, and I remember very closely when Elliott our standing next to each other at CSM, how long it was it remember that in California, I think, when whenever the Anaheim yeah, yeah.

05:15 – 10:04

Book that we has had this idea like, you know, we’re coming out with all these recognitions, but we really don’t know what it is that peaky are actually doing out there in terms of whites, specifically, a C L rehab returned to play return to sport return to life. Yeah. So when we were working together at shop, we do a lot of these functional and strength testing on patients that we weren’t really seeing. And when we were talking to them while they while they were coming in. You were getting again, gambit whole gambit as far as what they were doing regarding every in along with what kind of critique. Syrian that they’re, they’re practicing teachers were using this got us to thinking about, you know, yes, there are recommendations and guidelines out there, but is there that much variability out there in nickel practice? Gotcha. So you’re seeing what all the research was, and that’s what you’re doing at CSM, but you’re saying what’s actually being done, what where’s, where’s the translation? What’s the hand off from research and best practices to what’s actually being done with athletes? Yeah, I think yeah. And I think it also kind of reverse too, because we had that kinda unique experience at shop. Where are surging kind of require their patients to come the are there teams are to make sure they are functional testing program, where they the L part of that is, it’s great because we get interacted patient that we’re not treating on a day-to-day basis, we’re seeing at three months post op or six months and saying, all right. Tell me what you’re doing. And we hear from the patient’s perspective, are they are they following of, like, what we would consider to be best practice guidelines what have they done? Maybe prior to come. In and the patient, assessing aunts. And then, and then we give to CSM we hear what all this really great research is saying, man, we should be doing. We should be doing more. We shouldn’t do, and it’s like, but, you know, the, the patients that we have coming in from outside, our walls, or maybe not even doing happened that too. So it’s like, you know, it really spurred that idea what, what happened was the general practitioner that seeing, you know, maybe mostly maybe low back pain, or older patients when they get kind of SEAL that walkner door, you know, that they may not be a specialist in these the what is what does that person doing to make decisions about returns person, the play I like how it was formulated, organically, guys standing there together at, at CSM and saying, hey, what about this? Why don’t we take a look at the cool part was you guys went and follow through, and you wind up doing it. So, so talk about what happened next after that moment, when you actually follow through, we kind of formulated the idea, and we brought together, what we’ve dealt with a really good team, people with orthopedic surgeons that we work with here at job, and in PT’s, and we kinda got the, the survey. Of what we wanted to the question that we wanted to ask formulated together. And then we thought, hey, great idea, not only look at what therapists are doing. But on the other side, we look at the PD surgeon, they’re doing as well. So he came up with this idea of maybe the three sixty degrees, scope of people that are involved in, in these rehab decision, seeing what if kind of the Philip how to be in the orthopedic surgeons are kind of the overall directors, they’re the ones that are delivering the protocols for their patients. And, you know, saying this is what should be done. You know, we should see what they think about package patterns TT’s, or the one we’re in the trenches were the ones that actually were applying testing. But we feel should be best. You know what is what the P T say we wanted to kind of see what are both sides would say. And then maybe the compare contrast and draw conclusions from that. Unlike the more like a time line and being able to see again, what’s, what’s best practice. That’s great. But what’s actually being done on both ends in terms of the orthopedic surgeons and then the follow through with the, the physical therapists after? The surgery. So, so how’d you guys approach it and, and what you guys fine. Let’s get into the nitty gritty yet for one of the biggest things that we found was that there was a large variability, not physical therapist, but also with the orthopedic surgeon, and I think it really probably under floors, or underestimates, the ability out there, because the sample that we took from was the sports section with exception in private practice section, or what formerly known as those sections, I should say with their new name changes. But it’s a pretty, if you think about it a homogeneous sample of people, you would think that would be in the know of the current landscape of the literature, who would probably under floors, or under made the, the true, very villi out there similarly that we, we found even more variety in the orthopedic population, certain population, and that was the sample of pediatric orthopedic surgeon from the research and sports medicine group prison. Group, once again, a very homogeneous sample that tends to be a little bit more up to date with their with their current recommendation. So we, we were, we were quite quick deprived prize, the degree of Billy that we found, so, so I just want to stop you there to make sure I understand what you’re saying, and make sure the audience gets it too.

10:04 – 15:09

So you’re saying this groups free homogeneous you figured it, would they be more well informed because these are the people who go out of their way to not only be members but to be section or academy members and seek out the research, so they should have been sticking to or at least be closer to the best practice guidelines that have been put forth so far. But you saw variability, which you’re saying really really, really highlights how much variability was out there that you couldn’t even reach at xactly yet. Okay. I just didn’t wanna make sure I, I want to make sure I understood that. So it’s okay that is that is pretty telling what were some of the results you want to get into some of the some of the highlights. And some of the things that you guys found that maybe surprise you or didn’t surprise you. If you think about the decision. Making profits or what you’re the tools. You’re using from, from time based parameters to some type of strength criteria to some type of stumps performance measure to maybe some type of patient outcome measure or psychological attachment or contract dry. I mean, the variation existed across all of those, but even some of the more kind of would you consider maybe more concrete things like time we’re not even agreeing on time when the progress patience right now and you think that there’s probably the better most amount of research looking to support like those simple those, those type of concrete things. But we can’t even agree. And then when you start drilling down into the details about well, are reassessing strength and a lot of everybody agreed like. Yeah. Strength is important. But then we asked, how are you assessing strength that then variability just started from there? Right. And some people there was a large proportion of the sample PT’s that, you know, just relied on manual muscle testing to progress their patients and kind of what the literature showing is that, you know, we’re not going to be able to. Identify these higher levels of gases. Pete that may exist for these patients, when they’re strong but they’re just not strong enough using now montage, tonight’s lesion. But then when people are using either more objective measures, like handle their no mama tree. Or there’s availability rice the testing the standard that which they’re holding them to the variability just continues to progress where some people required seventy five percent. Maybe limbs imaging index and some people were maybe above one hundred percent. It’s there’s just, you know, the organizer surprised they as we drill down. You know, the win the details of what we’re doing and everyday practice, we can agree on broad strokes. We can agree that strengthening important, the man when you start like measuring strength like how you’re actually applying and doing that. That’s really different from everybody. Do you see in the framework is there? But how you actually apply and actually measure things like time or strength, which everyone pretty much agrees on being important factors to take into consideration when you start. Looking even smaller there. That’s where you see even more the very variability come into play. Yeah. Yeah. Eric, what do you want more like the devil? That was in the house a little bit like he talked to finishing tonight and nobody’s gonna argue that strength that meet strength. This is not going to be important. But I think once you start to, to hammer down on to power, they testing or something the strength of, of, of their patients. Are you really comparing apples to apples when when you start to go across different clinics, clinician and patients? And I think it really does create a little bit confusion, not just in the PT population in the clinic population. But Auckland patients to talk with one another, when they’re like, oh, yeah. I think cleared how they took your or yeah, they, they hooked me up to this machine four times. And, and I have to get at least ninety cent and the other person’s like oh, I’ve never done that before. And they’re back on the field plan already. I think it really does create a little bit of confusion within the society as well as are we really treating the same patients across different clinicians in clinic. And practitioners in the same profession. You know, right. That’s and that’s a great example of when you get to patients together, and they say, oh, we have the same injury, we must have done the same type of rehab, or at least hit these big big benchmarks. And when they’re different that’s confusing. And again, I get it, you know, patients are different from patient to patient. But if this is what best practices are, how come there’s so much variability? What were you able to hone in and either measure and ask, or at least if not speculate? Why is it? Why, why do we take it upon ourselves to, to have so much variability within the PT arm of the survey that we thought he’d be able to get one of those details? We, we tried to look at commision doctor that maybe influenced some of their him their decision that the us. So we had we kind of broke people down into, like either, high volume or low volume practitioners, where we said, anybody that treated more than ten miles per year. We accounted for them at high volume. Actitities and those less than that were low volume. We looked at certified specialists versus not certified specialists. And we don’t think years of clinical experience, and you know, if we if we use, we don’t know what that program is or, you know, like like you said, a few times we have our current, you know, Beth standard that we have our practice standard.

15:09 – 20:08

But we know if those are ideal hopefully change as we continue to learn more. But if we lived up to characteristics of the clinicians relative to the decision, they were making it seem like certified specialists were more likely to follow either which beat, of course, board certified specialists more likely to follow those kind of current practice guideline, and also those clinicians that were that were into our high volume clinicians seem to kind of follow more those best practice standards. So jor Beth is kind of what we’ve only result is that meeting. Those conditions are maybe more tied into the current literature or maybe by into the current literature more maybe see the investment in their practice going out. Of the way there, that’s a self selected group, which we started talking about the top of the show. These are people who say when your SAS, or when you’re seeing high volume, I’m I better, I better be doing the best because I’m practices wise because I’m seeing so many of these types of patients, these specific type of patients each and every year variability in terms of testing, I could imagine sometimes would have to do with ability of Quebec. Right. Each practice setting is going to be different. Yeah, definitely. And I think Becky him about a up in some of our speculation that people that had can be high volume a, you know, probably see the investment in an economic Donna, Mamata, or even like a handheld on a monitor roof with someone who may maybe in a facility where they’re not being as many of those types of patients may not be willing to invest in something because there’s no cost benefit for them or return on their investment in the long term. And obviously, there are other financial issues that you come across. Basis issues potentially. So I think there’s a lot of confounding issues that could arrive that can reason why someone is not using this type of instrumentation where can work in the audience, find this and, and download and kind of consumer themselves want to make sure they get access to it. Yes. The PTA survey published in jail at BT in October issue. Twenty eighteen and me surge in order big surgeon arm of the study was just published last month on in the orthopedic journalist sports medicine, Zingo them, and you can download that, that’s a full tech there, you can download full text there. No problem. What, what was the what was some of the attitudes of people who participated in this after the, the results will reveal work were they shocked were they surprised to were they, you know, pledging to, to change their practice because they saw such variability or anything come out of that, you know, I don’t think it was that surprising. I think I think disturbing survey kinda showed what everybody coming, Verdy thought. Victor knew existed that there’s variation out there and everyone’s like, wow, I, I knew it was variable. But I didn’t think it was very -able. You know what I think that was kind of, like just reinforced them the some of the thoughts, we did get a couple of emails from people like saying, hey, this is this is really nice really enjoyed remiss kinda good study, but I don’t know air and different Binyamin that no you know what it was interesting. I think you’ve gotta lar- a lot of publicity on social media platforms almost like the like a shock value of you need to do better. You know, by no means do I think you are. Is it is it bulletproof is it the best thing out there? Is it catching all people who may be at risk? But, but at least it’s the best we have at this point. But it seems if people aren’t even doing that at this point. So how could we really say that it’s not doing what it claims to be doing? If people aren’t there aren’t really doing it. So I think it, it really gained some headway on, on the media platform of saying, hey guys, let’s do a little bit better out there. I like that good. Take a quick break want to thank our sponsors are east medical staffing for keeping the show on the air. They find jobs, whether you’re gonna do so Adelphia or Long Island or anywhere you want to do a beach a lake. He wanna go mountains. He want to ski you can do that. That’s the cool part of variability in our in our profession is people need PT all over. So go do what you want where you want to do it. And Arias get you set up a U, R, E US, medical dot com. Not only just having the positions. But as well as being with a walkie through all the pain points. What do I do if I’m licensed in New York? But I want to go work in California for a couple of months they’ve got people on board to help you walk you through that. So you’re not on your own housing. How do you find where to live and is the person that use hiring you? They pay for that. They’ve got someone to walk you through that as well. The thing that could knit freaked me out the most was taxes. If you live in New York, but you’re temporarily working in Colorado. What do you do again? Arias has someone for that as well. So check them out, if you want to do a short term placement or look into relocate long-term, a U, R, E US medical dot com. Where, where would you guys go if you could go anywhere in the fifty states, if you do exactly what you wanna do what state, haven’t you been to that? You would give shot for thirteen weeks.

20:09 – 25:05

What bait haven’t I been to? Well, I was thinking more of that. I have been to Florida gator, we go down to Pensacola Beach, Florida every odd year for a week, and that is one of my favorite places in the United States. But opera played the haven’t been to having not ally. They had not been there, I would probably pick some somewhere in the mountain bikers aggo could Pacific northwest. Well at school party where the fifty states check him out. You are US medical dot com. Extent stay tuned. The we’ll be right back to the P T on cast. If you look at for education passed your physical therapy degree, look no further than Brooks. H L, Brooks rehabilitation institute of higher learning you could find out more Brooks, I h l dot org continuing education along with residencies and fellowships residencies in Orthopaedics, geriatrics, women’s health, neurologic PT, pediatrics, sports, and fellowship opportunity as well. So look into it if you’re looking to expand your knowledge base Brooks, IHL dot org to the typecast with Jimmy MacKay question. How was the how are the views or how was the reaction you guys mentioned, some kind of shock value on on social media saying, hey, come almost a rallying cry. But we, we need to do better. Let’s do better. Was there any reaction from the orthopedic surgeons since they’re the kind of the first touch point in the patient, and then they pass them off to us betcha they expect us to be doing best practices? What was their reaction to the results? I haven’t seen much reaction to the there’s a lot more talk about it and probably considerable Eric. And I of fly in within the realm when we did present it that at conference. We got a lot of really good feedback. We actually won best paper award at the prison conference the year, we did present this at that conference. I think there was there was a lot of kind of good Baillieu in, in the in the paper and the topics. And you know, we’re hoping that maybe it’s going to help drive Johnston change where beating side and change things around to so, so, so alternately. I guess the question to ask, is how do we do better? You know, we have these academies, now we specialize, we have best practices is there anything that you would that you, if you could make may wave. Magic wand that you put into play. How can we do better? I did a residency at the. I did a residency at the at the university of Delaware did for threatens there under the guidance of insider macadear who’s been acute advocate for the tests. You know, you need to test the folk and there’s been research out there that said, don’t, don’t need an kind of garner monitor to assess quad strikes you all you need is in the extension, machine that every clinic was throwing out a few years back and now the starting to get them out of the trash. So I think it comes down to, you know what take the time out. It’s worth your while for the information that you get just to do repetition, maximum testing if that’s all you have is you have a handheld item ometer, you use both types of testing, but I think it’s taking the time out and maybe sacrificing other parts of your of your treatment to really get the data that you need to make educated decisions. And that’s a valuable thing, right? Giving up some time. But if if, if what you’re presenting his is correct, which we, we would assume that would be since its best practices that time is well, spent, we’ll we’re going to say sorry to cut you off yet. I agree. I think engage in this conversation is actually helpful in getting some of the some of that social media. No on your your, your show. You’ve talked about kind of lag time between evidence to trickle down everyday practice. And I think that the social media conversations really helpful with and they can push us that people probably wouldn’t have picked up the paper or read it beforehand. And there’s there’s so much stuff about about ACL coming out. I mean I mean hundreds of papers every year to try and I get that. But I think trying to just these maybe maybe helped reinforce some of this, you know, the current standard that we think are the best to try to help, you know, get that out to general practitioners that don’t specialize an easy else, but probably Seeven majority of easy L patients because they make up the majority of the general practices that are out there, and maybe helping to adopt you know, the doctor and the guidelines that are that are being put forward. We’ll look at Alex, look the positive at least there are best practices, right? And we’re pushing we’re pushing up professor. Towards finding out what is best that’s great. That’s a great problem to have is. How do we know? How are we going to disseminate that and make sure it gets put into play? At least we got that first part least, we’re really, really paying attention to the first part. Now, if we as you just mentioned, continue to have those conversations, maybe hopefully it’ll help that second part with this emanation last thing. I wanted to ask Eric, you’ve got a unique situation in terms of, of working with students any strategies to encourage students and new clinicians to adopting best practices, and making the change in current practice patterns, to hopefully as they progress in their careers continue that and then teach other students to change the profession.

25:05 – 30:18

Yeah. You know, I had as a an instructor in professor at this point, I tend to utilize a lot of media and podcasts, some of your own actually and other types of logs and things like that after screen through them with my Hyun because I feel like it’s very powerful to hear it from the door at both. So more. Digestible for them than reading the text books. Hearing me talk about it up there. So I utilize that empowers them to get engaged in conversation with the people who are actually putting out literature, and the people who do have experience aside from hearing it from myself as a sage on the stage. I also my mantra to the students are you know they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that, that, that catalyst in the clinic, don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with he that change. Bring the new culture two who’ve been out there who, who may not know what, what is new in the research realm. So I, I really encountered them to be that catalyst that change of the profession, taking it from out of the academic side of things into clinical practice love it. Be the change. Right. It’s not gonna change unless you take what you exactly what it is take what you learn in school, and your clinical rotations and actually, start to do it love that last. Part of the show is the parting shot. It is the parting shot. The Portland shot is brought to you by rock tape more than just the tape company. Rock tape is a movement company, tools and education for medical professionals, if you look at it help, your patients, go stronger longer. Checkout rock tape dot com. You guys have an opportunity to leave one one sentiment with the audience before you go who wants to go first with their partying shop Erica, you kick it off that. All right. So, I guess my parting dot would probably be addictive. Festive, we could do with younger. Patients is its neck with them understand that they’re not an eight the pair, their person who had an affair, and in dealing with kids and dealing with adults. You know you need to manage each person’s differently by using the evidence as your guide, but understanding that you need to tell about intimate independence to the person. And if you could just connect with that person, you’re, you’re, you’re gonna make that person better, regardless of, of. What you do as long as you’re you’re, you’re letting Evan guide you love at Elliot. You’re up and parting shot when he got I think just making sure you continue to grow as a clinician, you know, I think seeing a lot of as the ovation in unfortunately thing, a lot of them hail or have re injury or or secondary injury has has driven me to want to get better. You know. And I think just kind of continuing to grow as condition, and, and, and use those, those events or in that let learning to, to better yourself for the next person around is, is an important thing love that before we go. I’m just you. You’re prescribing podcast episodes, as homework or is outside learning to students love to hear that. I am. I and actually I get made fun of by my other faculty members because of it. But obviously, I listen to a lot of them my forehand. I don’t just give it to them, but I feel like it’s a lot more digestible for them. They can do it while they’re driving into school. They could do it while they’re working out. So. They can work it into their, their everyday life. And it also brings them. They stumble upon other things within that podcast. And it’s more student directed learning after that because they’re like, oh, I listen to this on certain podcast. And then I saw another episode that I was in it really interests me. So it starts to get them on that self directed learning which which is so important for when they do graduate is, how do they, you know, now the information coming to them, they have to go out and seek it? So it teaches them that new skill. You know, selfishly a love to hear that because I host a couple of different podcasts. But I like it because as the as the guy with a degree in communications you’re talking or you’re trying to facilitate a conversation, the way your audience listens. And you’re listening the way your audience talks, and that’s a way to facilitate great conversation instead of what you mentioned earlier being the sage on the stage. That’s a presentation. Right. Some people do learn really well from presentation myself, I’m a conversation guy, obviously. So, you know, selfishly hey, love love to hear that. You’re prescribing assigning podcast episodes, maybe one or two for my show to students, but just love the fact that you’re open to and Anna do want to highlight you mentioned it twice that you do screen through that. Anybody with a microphone create a podcast super easy. But I love the fact that you’re screening it and highlighting. Hey, pay attention to this, and they do after that, if they trip across an episode that hasn’t been screened they need to take that upon themselves because there’s a lot of information in less than great information out there to. Absolutely. I think that’s the most important thing. Is that you’re, you’re, you’re really screening through it to make sure because there’s a lot of stuff out there, that, that maybe you doesn’t really job with the intentions of, of what you want them to get to learn and last point, I’ll make love that too, because once they graduate, they don’t have a professor down the hall or they aren’t running into someone each and every week.

30:19 – 32:32

We’re having that information brought to them, they need to start to seek it out. And think, you know, handing over day of a blog to read or. Podcast, listen to or video channel follow. That’s a great digestible way as we mentioned before, of getting information. Once you start working forty hours a week when you graduate gentlemen, want to say thanks very much for your time. Don’t think it will be the last one. We have you guys on the show, but etc. Service episode with everybody. On the P T cast is a product of p t pint cast LLC it is hosted and produced by p t podcasts. EEO Jim McKay, and CBO sky, Donovan from Marymount university, we talk PT, drink, beer, and record it this has been another poor from the PT pint cast the PD podcasts in ten for educational purposes. Only no clinical decision making should be based solely on one source while Perez, taken to ensure accuracy, factual errors can be present. More on the show at PT podcasts dot com. We’re home on the internet t-, pine cast dot com created by build PT. Build PT provides marketing services, specifically for private practice, PT’s website, development and hosted inviting content marketing solutions PT clinics across the country. See with good PT can do for you. Today dot com. The PT pint cast proudly supports the Travis mills foundation on April tenth twenty twelve United States army staff sergeant Travis mills of the eighty second airborne was critically injured on his third tour of duty in Afghanistan by while on patrol losing portions of both legs, and both arms. He is one of only five quadruple amputees from the wars in Iraq, and Afghanistan to survive his injuries, thanks to his amazing strength, courage, and incredible will to live the heroic actions of the men in his unit. The prayers of thousands and all the healthcare providers at the Walter Reed Army medical center. Travis remains on the road to recovery. He founded the Travis mills foundation, a nonprofit organization formed to benefit and assist. Combat injured. Teran’s. Travis lives by his motto never give up. Never quit to support the Travis mills foundation. Or to find out more visit Travis mills dot org.

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ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg We talk with Eric & Elliot Greenburg (no relation) about ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes.<br /> <br /> Topics hit:<br /> <br /> High rates of ACL injury and repeat injury among youth/adolescent athletes.<br /> <br /> Recent publications of ours that identifying variability of rehabilitation methods in determination of progression of activity following ACL reconstruction among physical therapists and orthopedic surgeons<br /> <br /> Controversy regarding what criteria "should" be used to help determine rehab progression, including return to sports among this population. Translating evidence into practice, which is not occurring according to our survey results. <br /> <br /> How can we optimize rehabilitation in a world of managed care, escalating copays and high deductible insurance plans. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 32:32
APTA NEXT Conference Chicago preview. W Northwestern Faculty & Students https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/06/06/apta-next-conference-chicago-preview-w-northwestern-faculty-students/ Thu, 06 Jun 2019 11:06:21 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5562 APTA NEXT Conference Chicago preview. W Northwestern Faculty & Students We sat down to talk with a pair of Northwestern PTs and a current Northwestern SPT about all things CHICAGO! As we descend upon Chicago for the NEXT conference this June we asked locals where they'd drink, eat and visit if you had limited time in the Windy City.<br /> <br /> Thanks to Kirsten Moisio, PT, PhD<br /> Justin Drogos, PT, DPT, NCS<br /> and<br /> Katie McLeland, SPT Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 31:38 I Survived, Now What?! with Mary Massery https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/06/05/i-survived-now-what-with-mary-massery/ Wed, 05 Jun 2019 17:54:40 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5560 I Survived, Now What?! with Mary Massery We talk with Mary Massery again about her course I Survived, Now What?! <br /> <br /> Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:<br /> 1. Describe the relationship between chronic health conditions (pediatric & adult), atypical motor plans for<br /> breathing and/or postural stability, and the development of secondary musculoskeletal deficits.<br /> 2. Screen for musculoskeletal abnormalities, inadequate core stabilization strategies and compensatory breathing<br /> patterns that may contribute to the abnormal alignment of the rib cage, trunk and/or spine secondary to pediatric<br /> and adult chronic health conditions.<br /> 3. Develop and demonstrate musculoskeletal mobilization and soft tissue techniques of the rib cage, trunk and<br /> spine to correct or minimize these deformities.<br /> 4. Develop subsequent treatment plans for neuromuscular retraining that is focused on simultaneously optimizing<br /> breathing, core stabilization and p Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 37:21 Telehealth physical therapy distilled with Rob Vining https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/06/03/telehealth-physical-therapy-distilled-with-rob-vining/ Mon, 03 Jun 2019 09:38:01 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5548 We talk to Rob Vining who is a Telehealth PT leader. Rob has a podcast dedicated to the topic (https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/telehealth-20-podcast/id1387212131) as well as a facebook group (https://www.facebook.com/groups/TelehealthPTs/?ref=share) that shares ideas and concepts on the topic within the profession.

ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg | 2 hrs ago

0:00 – 05:14

Hi, I’m Alexa. You can now hear PT podcast. Using me just say, hey Alexa, launched PT, pint cast, or you could be nice and try saying, please for lunch, what is being polite? Dead these days to your episodes, just say, hey Alexa, launch PT pint cast, maybe throw in a please. At the end my monitor the -tudents are they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that Cadillac in the clinic. Don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with e that change. Bring the new culture two out there who, who may not know what is new in the research realm. So I really in power them to be that catalyst that change of the freshen taking your from the academic side of things into clinical practice. Get a chance to talk to the greenberg’s. Eric in Elliot Greenberg. No relation. They had a couple of publications about ACL rehab and best practices. We. Best practices, but are those best practices being put into practice? So did there. So they took a look at it from an orthopedic surgeon perspective, physical therapist, perspective, and really, ultimately wanted to see why or why not those best practices were being actually utilized. So we took a talk with those two guys at the same time in this episode take a listen. I think it’s got insights beyond just ACL rehab, right? Re really insights into where’s the fall off in best practice to actual practice. So we’re going to get into that with these guys episode brought to you by Owens recovery, science, a single source for PT’s looking for certification in personalized blood flow, restriction rehabilitation training and the equipment, you need to apply in your clinical practice Zach Ephron on social media, just see. And he’s going through ACL rehab, and using har-. So that’s, that’s kind of cool to see in the mainstream, and he did a little shout to his great physical therapist athletic trainers going through rehab. So check it out, Owens recovery science dot com. If you’d like to get certified. And grab that equipment, we do want to let you know, we have another podcast that’s been launched. N. P T E, study cast, helping students study for the board exams. So check it out wherever podcast or heard. I tunes Google play Spotify. N P, T E, study cast, it is brought to you by our friends at Arias medical staffing without them. We wouldn’t be able to bring it to you. We also have free downloadable study guides for each of the episodes short to the point episodes between three and nine minutes on average about the one hundred fifty most asked about path on the N P. So check that out. N P T study cast, now available ever podcast, hurt the best conversations happen at happy hour, welcome to hours forum award. This is the P T podcasts, here’s your host, physical therapist, Jimmy MacKay the best conversations happen at happy hour. Welcome two hours your next episode of PT podcast starch right now bring it into to grow. Converge do not get confused. They are not related Elliott and Eric Greenberg. Welcome to the show guys. I’d give negative. Thanks. I have an excellent art. So we’ll start with Elliott Elliott. What’s, what’s your background, which are the audience know about you about what, what you do in your daily life daily life? I’ve kind of limit role. I work at children’s Philadelphia about three-quarters clinician, and about one quarter researcher here special interest in knee, and shoulder injuries particular ACL’s, because what I see a lot of glad heavy Elliott and Eric. What’s your superhero back story here, backdoor, the right now? I’m on Long Island and I may. In Europe, at the New York technology where I even the curriculum, it’d be program, but also treat the NYC athlete. And my current interest include working with obviously the population with lower injuries and running related injury. Excellent. So how’d you guys meet anyway? I mean I know you know Elliott, you’re, you’re at shop Philly. Eric, you’re in New York. But have you guys cross paths was was it the same conference and picked up the others name tag because you both have the same last name or what? Yeah, it’s kind of a long story, but. I we unknowingly you know, kinda sorta cross paths, a long time in our in our in our lives together. But we, we did end up. We worked together at shop for a little while. And that’s really how he really got. No each other and work together, and kinda, formerly Egypt. So both of you guys have special interests in lower shrimp, the injuries Elliott working with pediatric and adolescent, sportsmed. Eric doing the same with some college athletes, and being a practicing as well. How did you guys decide to get together and do some research, and then we’ll get into what it was and where the audience can find it. Burqa started on the research paths together while we were together at shop. We did come out with a more retrospective analysis looking at the pediatric strengthen front-row, turn in the pediatric athlete, and then it kind of bird into a little more while, and I remember very closely when Elliott our standing next to each other at CSM, how long it was it remember that in California, I think, when whenever the Anaheim yeah, yeah.

05:15 – 10:04

Book that we has had this idea like, you know, we’re coming out with all these recognitions, but we really don’t know what it is that peaky are actually doing out there in terms of whites, specifically, a C L rehab returned to play return to sport return to life. Yeah. So when we were working together at shop, we do a lot of these functional and strength testing on patients that we weren’t really seeing. And when we were talking to them while they while they were coming in. You were getting again, gambit whole gambit as far as what they were doing regarding every in along with what kind of critique. Syrian that they’re, they’re practicing teachers were using this got us to thinking about, you know, yes, there are recommendations and guidelines out there, but is there that much variability out there in nickel practice? Gotcha. So you’re seeing what all the research was, and that’s what you’re doing at CSM, but you’re saying what’s actually being done, what where’s, where’s the translation? What’s the hand off from research and best practices to what’s actually being done with athletes? Yeah, I think yeah. And I think it also kind of reverse too, because we had that kinda unique experience at shop. Where are surging kind of require their patients to come the are there teams are to make sure they are functional testing program, where they the L part of that is, it’s great because we get interacted patient that we’re not treating on a day-to-day basis, we’re seeing at three months post op or six months and saying, all right. Tell me what you’re doing. And we hear from the patient’s perspective, are they are they following of, like, what we would consider to be best practice guidelines what have they done? Maybe prior to come. In and the patient, assessing aunts. And then, and then we give to CSM we hear what all this really great research is saying, man, we should be doing. We should be doing more. We shouldn’t do, and it’s like, but, you know, the, the patients that we have coming in from outside, our walls, or maybe not even doing happened that too. So it’s like, you know, it really spurred that idea what, what happened was the general practitioner that seeing, you know, maybe mostly maybe low back pain, or older patients when they get kind of SEAL that walkner door, you know, that they may not be a specialist in these the what is what does that person doing to make decisions about returns person, the play I like how it was formulated, organically, guys standing there together at, at CSM and saying, hey, what about this? Why don’t we take a look at the cool part was you guys went and follow through, and you wind up doing it. So, so talk about what happened next after that moment, when you actually follow through, we kind of formulated the idea, and we brought together, what we’ve dealt with a really good team, people with orthopedic surgeons that we work with here at job, and in PT’s, and we kinda got the, the survey. Of what we wanted to the question that we wanted to ask formulated together. And then we thought, hey, great idea, not only look at what therapists are doing. But on the other side, we look at the PD surgeon, they’re doing as well. So he came up with this idea of maybe the three sixty degrees, scope of people that are involved in, in these rehab decision, seeing what if kind of the Philip how to be in the orthopedic surgeons are kind of the overall directors, they’re the ones that are delivering the protocols for their patients. And, you know, saying this is what should be done. You know, we should see what they think about package patterns TT’s, or the one we’re in the trenches were the ones that actually were applying testing. But we feel should be best. You know what is what the P T say we wanted to kind of see what are both sides would say. And then maybe the compare contrast and draw conclusions from that. Unlike the more like a time line and being able to see again, what’s, what’s best practice. That’s great. But what’s actually being done on both ends in terms of the orthopedic surgeons and then the follow through with the, the physical therapists after? The surgery. So, so how’d you guys approach it and, and what you guys fine. Let’s get into the nitty gritty yet for one of the biggest things that we found was that there was a large variability, not physical therapist, but also with the orthopedic surgeon, and I think it really probably under floors, or underestimates, the ability out there, because the sample that we took from was the sports section with exception in private practice section, or what formerly known as those sections, I should say with their new name changes. But it’s a pretty, if you think about it a homogeneous sample of people, you would think that would be in the know of the current landscape of the literature, who would probably under floors, or under made the, the true, very villi out there similarly that we, we found even more variety in the orthopedic population, certain population, and that was the sample of pediatric orthopedic surgeon from the research and sports medicine group prison. Group, once again, a very homogeneous sample that tends to be a little bit more up to date with their with their current recommendation. So we, we were, we were quite quick deprived prize, the degree of Billy that we found, so, so I just want to stop you there to make sure I understand what you’re saying, and make sure the audience gets it too.

10:04 – 15:09

So you’re saying this groups free homogeneous you figured it, would they be more well informed because these are the people who go out of their way to not only be members but to be section or academy members and seek out the research, so they should have been sticking to or at least be closer to the best practice guidelines that have been put forth so far. But you saw variability, which you’re saying really really, really highlights how much variability was out there that you couldn’t even reach at xactly yet. Okay. I just didn’t wanna make sure I, I want to make sure I understood that. So it’s okay that is that is pretty telling what were some of the results you want to get into some of the some of the highlights. And some of the things that you guys found that maybe surprise you or didn’t surprise you. If you think about the decision. Making profits or what you’re the tools. You’re using from, from time based parameters to some type of strength criteria to some type of stumps performance measure to maybe some type of patient outcome measure or psychological attachment or contract dry. I mean, the variation existed across all of those, but even some of the more kind of would you consider maybe more concrete things like time we’re not even agreeing on time when the progress patience right now and you think that there’s probably the better most amount of research looking to support like those simple those, those type of concrete things. But we can’t even agree. And then when you start drilling down into the details about well, are reassessing strength and a lot of everybody agreed like. Yeah. Strength is important. But then we asked, how are you assessing strength that then variability just started from there? Right. And some people there was a large proportion of the sample PT’s that, you know, just relied on manual muscle testing to progress their patients and kind of what the literature showing is that, you know, we’re not going to be able to. Identify these higher levels of gases. Pete that may exist for these patients, when they’re strong but they’re just not strong enough using now montage, tonight’s lesion. But then when people are using either more objective measures, like handle their no mama tree. Or there’s availability rice the testing the standard that which they’re holding them to the variability just continues to progress where some people required seventy five percent. Maybe limbs imaging index and some people were maybe above one hundred percent. It’s there’s just, you know, the organizer surprised they as we drill down. You know, the win the details of what we’re doing and everyday practice, we can agree on broad strokes. We can agree that strengthening important, the man when you start like measuring strength like how you’re actually applying and doing that. That’s really different from everybody. Do you see in the framework is there? But how you actually apply and actually measure things like time or strength, which everyone pretty much agrees on being important factors to take into consideration when you start. Looking even smaller there. That’s where you see even more the very variability come into play. Yeah. Yeah. Eric, what do you want more like the devil? That was in the house a little bit like he talked to finishing tonight and nobody’s gonna argue that strength that meet strength. This is not going to be important. But I think once you start to, to hammer down on to power, they testing or something the strength of, of, of their patients. Are you really comparing apples to apples when when you start to go across different clinics, clinician and patients? And I think it really does create a little bit confusion, not just in the PT population in the clinic population. But Auckland patients to talk with one another, when they’re like, oh, yeah. I think cleared how they took your or yeah, they, they hooked me up to this machine four times. And, and I have to get at least ninety cent and the other person’s like oh, I’ve never done that before. And they’re back on the field plan already. I think it really does create a little bit of confusion within the society as well as are we really treating the same patients across different clinicians in clinic. And practitioners in the same profession. You know, right. That’s and that’s a great example of when you get to patients together, and they say, oh, we have the same injury, we must have done the same type of rehab, or at least hit these big big benchmarks. And when they’re different that’s confusing. And again, I get it, you know, patients are different from patient to patient. But if this is what best practices are, how come there’s so much variability? What were you able to hone in and either measure and ask, or at least if not speculate? Why is it? Why, why do we take it upon ourselves to, to have so much variability within the PT arm of the survey that we thought he’d be able to get one of those details? We, we tried to look at commision doctor that maybe influenced some of their him their decision that the us. So we had we kind of broke people down into, like either, high volume or low volume practitioners, where we said, anybody that treated more than ten miles per year. We accounted for them at high volume. Actitities and those less than that were low volume. We looked at certified specialists versus not certified specialists. And we don’t think years of clinical experience, and you know, if we if we use, we don’t know what that program is or, you know, like like you said, a few times we have our current, you know, Beth standard that we have our practice standard.

15:09 – 20:08

But we know if those are ideal hopefully change as we continue to learn more. But if we lived up to characteristics of the clinicians relative to the decision, they were making it seem like certified specialists were more likely to follow either which beat, of course, board certified specialists more likely to follow those kind of current practice guideline, and also those clinicians that were that were into our high volume clinicians seem to kind of follow more those best practice standards. So jor Beth is kind of what we’ve only result is that meeting. Those conditions are maybe more tied into the current literature or maybe by into the current literature more maybe see the investment in their practice going out. Of the way there, that’s a self selected group, which we started talking about the top of the show. These are people who say when your SAS, or when you’re seeing high volume, I’m I better, I better be doing the best because I’m practices wise because I’m seeing so many of these types of patients, these specific type of patients each and every year variability in terms of testing, I could imagine sometimes would have to do with ability of Quebec. Right. Each practice setting is going to be different. Yeah, definitely. And I think Becky him about a up in some of our speculation that people that had can be high volume a, you know, probably see the investment in an economic Donna, Mamata, or even like a handheld on a monitor roof with someone who may maybe in a facility where they’re not being as many of those types of patients may not be willing to invest in something because there’s no cost benefit for them or return on their investment in the long term. And obviously, there are other financial issues that you come across. Basis issues potentially. So I think there’s a lot of confounding issues that could arrive that can reason why someone is not using this type of instrumentation where can work in the audience, find this and, and download and kind of consumer themselves want to make sure they get access to it. Yes. The PTA survey published in jail at BT in October issue. Twenty eighteen and me surge in order big surgeon arm of the study was just published last month on in the orthopedic journalist sports medicine, Zingo them, and you can download that, that’s a full tech there, you can download full text there. No problem. What, what was the what was some of the attitudes of people who participated in this after the, the results will reveal work were they shocked were they surprised to were they, you know, pledging to, to change their practice because they saw such variability or anything come out of that, you know, I don’t think it was that surprising. I think I think disturbing survey kinda showed what everybody coming, Verdy thought. Victor knew existed that there’s variation out there and everyone’s like, wow, I, I knew it was variable. But I didn’t think it was very -able. You know what I think that was kind of, like just reinforced them the some of the thoughts, we did get a couple of emails from people like saying, hey, this is this is really nice really enjoyed remiss kinda good study, but I don’t know air and different Binyamin that no you know what it was interesting. I think you’ve gotta lar- a lot of publicity on social media platforms almost like the like a shock value of you need to do better. You know, by no means do I think you are. Is it is it bulletproof is it the best thing out there? Is it catching all people who may be at risk? But, but at least it’s the best we have at this point. But it seems if people aren’t even doing that at this point. So how could we really say that it’s not doing what it claims to be doing? If people aren’t there aren’t really doing it. So I think it, it really gained some headway on, on the media platform of saying, hey guys, let’s do a little bit better out there. I like that good. Take a quick break want to thank our sponsors are east medical staffing for keeping the show on the air. They find jobs, whether you’re gonna do so Adelphia or Long Island or anywhere you want to do a beach a lake. He wanna go mountains. He want to ski you can do that. That’s the cool part of variability in our in our profession is people need PT all over. So go do what you want where you want to do it. And Arias get you set up a U, R, E US, medical dot com. Not only just having the positions. But as well as being with a walkie through all the pain points. What do I do if I’m licensed in New York? But I want to go work in California for a couple of months they’ve got people on board to help you walk you through that. So you’re not on your own housing. How do you find where to live and is the person that use hiring you? They pay for that. They’ve got someone to walk you through that as well. The thing that could knit freaked me out the most was taxes. If you live in New York, but you’re temporarily working in Colorado. What do you do again? Arias has someone for that as well. So check them out, if you want to do a short term placement or look into relocate long-term, a U, R, E US medical dot com. Where, where would you guys go if you could go anywhere in the fifty states, if you do exactly what you wanna do what state, haven’t you been to that? You would give shot for thirteen weeks.

20:09 – 25:05

What bait haven’t I been to? Well, I was thinking more of that. I have been to Florida gator, we go down to Pensacola Beach, Florida every odd year for a week, and that is one of my favorite places in the United States. But opera played the haven’t been to having not ally. They had not been there, I would probably pick some somewhere in the mountain bikers aggo could Pacific northwest. Well at school party where the fifty states check him out. You are US medical dot com. Extent stay tuned. The we’ll be right back to the P T on cast. If you look at for education passed your physical therapy degree, look no further than Brooks. H L, Brooks rehabilitation institute of higher learning you could find out more Brooks, I h l dot org continuing education along with residencies and fellowships residencies in Orthopaedics, geriatrics, women’s health, neurologic PT, pediatrics, sports, and fellowship opportunity as well. So look into it if you’re looking to expand your knowledge base Brooks, IHL dot org to the typecast with Jimmy MacKay question. How was the how are the views or how was the reaction you guys mentioned, some kind of shock value on on social media saying, hey, come almost a rallying cry. But we, we need to do better. Let’s do better. Was there any reaction from the orthopedic surgeons since they’re the kind of the first touch point in the patient, and then they pass them off to us betcha they expect us to be doing best practices? What was their reaction to the results? I haven’t seen much reaction to the there’s a lot more talk about it and probably considerable Eric. And I of fly in within the realm when we did present it that at conference. We got a lot of really good feedback. We actually won best paper award at the prison conference the year, we did present this at that conference. I think there was there was a lot of kind of good Baillieu in, in the in the paper and the topics. And you know, we’re hoping that maybe it’s going to help drive Johnston change where beating side and change things around to so, so, so alternately. I guess the question to ask, is how do we do better? You know, we have these academies, now we specialize, we have best practices is there anything that you would that you, if you could make may wave. Magic wand that you put into play. How can we do better? I did a residency at the. I did a residency at the at the university of Delaware did for threatens there under the guidance of insider macadear who’s been acute advocate for the tests. You know, you need to test the folk and there’s been research out there that said, don’t, don’t need an kind of garner monitor to assess quad strikes you all you need is in the extension, machine that every clinic was throwing out a few years back and now the starting to get them out of the trash. So I think it comes down to, you know what take the time out. It’s worth your while for the information that you get just to do repetition, maximum testing if that’s all you have is you have a handheld item ometer, you use both types of testing, but I think it’s taking the time out and maybe sacrificing other parts of your of your treatment to really get the data that you need to make educated decisions. And that’s a valuable thing, right? Giving up some time. But if if, if what you’re presenting his is correct, which we, we would assume that would be since its best practices that time is well, spent, we’ll we’re going to say sorry to cut you off yet. I agree. I think engage in this conversation is actually helpful in getting some of the some of that social media. No on your your, your show. You’ve talked about kind of lag time between evidence to trickle down everyday practice. And I think that the social media conversations really helpful with and they can push us that people probably wouldn’t have picked up the paper or read it beforehand. And there’s there’s so much stuff about about ACL coming out. I mean I mean hundreds of papers every year to try and I get that. But I think trying to just these maybe maybe helped reinforce some of this, you know, the current standard that we think are the best to try to help, you know, get that out to general practitioners that don’t specialize an easy else, but probably Seeven majority of easy L patients because they make up the majority of the general practices that are out there, and maybe helping to adopt you know, the doctor and the guidelines that are that are being put forward. We’ll look at Alex, look the positive at least there are best practices, right? And we’re pushing we’re pushing up professor. Towards finding out what is best that’s great. That’s a great problem to have is. How do we know? How are we going to disseminate that and make sure it gets put into play? At least we got that first part least, we’re really, really paying attention to the first part. Now, if we as you just mentioned, continue to have those conversations, maybe hopefully it’ll help that second part with this emanation last thing. I wanted to ask Eric, you’ve got a unique situation in terms of, of working with students any strategies to encourage students and new clinicians to adopting best practices, and making the change in current practice patterns, to hopefully as they progress in their careers continue that and then teach other students to change the profession.

25:05 – 30:18

Yeah. You know, I had as a an instructor in professor at this point, I tend to utilize a lot of media and podcasts, some of your own actually and other types of logs and things like that after screen through them with my Hyun because I feel like it’s very powerful to hear it from the door at both. So more. Digestible for them than reading the text books. Hearing me talk about it up there. So I utilize that empowers them to get engaged in conversation with the people who are actually putting out literature, and the people who do have experience aside from hearing it from myself as a sage on the stage. I also my mantra to the students are you know they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that, that, that catalyst in the clinic, don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with he that change. Bring the new culture two who’ve been out there who, who may not know what, what is new in the research realm. So I, I really encountered them to be that catalyst that change of the profession, taking it from out of the academic side of things into clinical practice love it. Be the change. Right. It’s not gonna change unless you take what you exactly what it is take what you learn in school, and your clinical rotations and actually, start to do it love that last. Part of the show is the parting shot. It is the parting shot. The Portland shot is brought to you by rock tape more than just the tape company. Rock tape is a movement company, tools and education for medical professionals, if you look at it help, your patients, go stronger longer. Checkout rock tape dot com. You guys have an opportunity to leave one one sentiment with the audience before you go who wants to go first with their partying shop Erica, you kick it off that. All right. So, I guess my parting dot would probably be addictive. Festive, we could do with younger. Patients is its neck with them understand that they’re not an eight the pair, their person who had an affair, and in dealing with kids and dealing with adults. You know you need to manage each person’s differently by using the evidence as your guide, but understanding that you need to tell about intimate independence to the person. And if you could just connect with that person, you’re, you’re, you’re gonna make that person better, regardless of, of. What you do as long as you’re you’re, you’re letting Evan guide you love at Elliot. You’re up and parting shot when he got I think just making sure you continue to grow as a clinician, you know, I think seeing a lot of as the ovation in unfortunately thing, a lot of them hail or have re injury or or secondary injury has has driven me to want to get better. You know. And I think just kind of continuing to grow as condition, and, and, and use those, those events or in that let learning to, to better yourself for the next person around is, is an important thing love that before we go. I’m just you. You’re prescribing podcast episodes, as homework or is outside learning to students love to hear that. I am. I and actually I get made fun of by my other faculty members because of it. But obviously, I listen to a lot of them my forehand. I don’t just give it to them, but I feel like it’s a lot more digestible for them. They can do it while they’re driving into school. They could do it while they’re working out. So. They can work it into their, their everyday life. And it also brings them. They stumble upon other things within that podcast. And it’s more student directed learning after that because they’re like, oh, I listen to this on certain podcast. And then I saw another episode that I was in it really interests me. So it starts to get them on that self directed learning which which is so important for when they do graduate is, how do they, you know, now the information coming to them, they have to go out and seek it? So it teaches them that new skill. You know, selfishly a love to hear that because I host a couple of different podcasts. But I like it because as the as the guy with a degree in communications you’re talking or you’re trying to facilitate a conversation, the way your audience listens. And you’re listening the way your audience talks, and that’s a way to facilitate great conversation instead of what you mentioned earlier being the sage on the stage. That’s a presentation. Right. Some people do learn really well from presentation myself, I’m a conversation guy, obviously. So, you know, selfishly hey, love love to hear that. You’re prescribing assigning podcast episodes, maybe one or two for my show to students, but just love the fact that you’re open to and Anna do want to highlight you mentioned it twice that you do screen through that. Anybody with a microphone create a podcast super easy. But I love the fact that you’re screening it and highlighting. Hey, pay attention to this, and they do after that, if they trip across an episode that hasn’t been screened they need to take that upon themselves because there’s a lot of information in less than great information out there to. Absolutely. I think that’s the most important thing. Is that you’re, you’re, you’re really screening through it to make sure because there’s a lot of stuff out there, that, that maybe you doesn’t really job with the intentions of, of what you want them to get to learn and last point, I’ll make love that too, because once they graduate, they don’t have a professor down the hall or they aren’t running into someone each and every week.

30:19 – 32:32

We’re having that information brought to them, they need to start to seek it out. And think, you know, handing over day of a blog to read or. Podcast, listen to or video channel follow. That’s a great digestible way as we mentioned before, of getting information. Once you start working forty hours a week when you graduate gentlemen, want to say thanks very much for your time. Don’t think it will be the last one. We have you guys on the show, but etc. Service episode with everybody. On the P T cast is a product of p t pint cast LLC it is hosted and produced by p t podcasts. EEO Jim McKay, and CBO sky, Donovan from Marymount university, we talk PT, drink, beer, and record it this has been another poor from the PT pint cast the PD podcasts in ten for educational purposes. Only no clinical decision making should be based solely on one source while Perez, taken to ensure accuracy, factual errors can be present. More on the show at PT podcasts dot com. We’re home on the internet t-, pine cast dot com created by build PT. Build PT provides marketing services, specifically for private practice, PT’s website, development and hosted inviting content marketing solutions PT clinics across the country. See with good PT can do for you. Today dot com. The PT pint cast proudly supports the Travis mills foundation on April tenth twenty twelve United States army staff sergeant Travis mills of the eighty second airborne was critically injured on his third tour of duty in Afghanistan by while on patrol losing portions of both legs, and both arms. He is one of only five quadruple amputees from the wars in Iraq, and Afghanistan to survive his injuries, thanks to his amazing strength, courage, and incredible will to live the heroic actions of the men in his unit. The prayers of thousands and all the healthcare providers at the Walter Reed Army medical center. Travis remains on the road to recovery. He founded the Travis mills foundation, a nonprofit organization formed to benefit and assist. Combat injured. Teran’s. Travis lives by his motto never give up. Never quit to support the Travis mills foundation. Or to find out more visit Travis mills dot org.

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ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg We talk with Eric & Elliot Greenburg (no relation) about ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes.<br /> <br /> Topics hit:<br /> <br /> High rates of ACL injury and repeat injury among youth/adolescent athletes.<br /> <br /> Recent publications of ours that identifying variability of rehabilitation methods in determination of progression of activity following ACL reconstruction among physical therapists and orthopedic surgeons<br /> <br /> Controversy regarding what criteria "should" be used to help determine rehab progression, including return to sports among this population. Translating evidence into practice, which is not occurring according to our survey results. <br /> <br /> How can we optimize rehabilitation in a world of managed care, escalating copays and high deductible insurance plans. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 32:32
Rethinking dynamic knee valgus & injury with Steve Dischiavi https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/05/30/rethinking-dynamic-knee-valgus-injury-with-steve-dischiavi/ Thu, 30 May 2019 12:33:01 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5543 We talk to Steve Dischiavi about a recent viewpoint he helped write in JOSPT on dynamic knee valgus and the relation to injury.

ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg | 2 hrs ago

0:00 – 05:14

Hi, I’m Alexa. You can now hear PT podcast. Using me just say, hey Alexa, launched PT, pint cast, or you could be nice and try saying, please for lunch, what is being polite? Dead these days to your episodes, just say, hey Alexa, launch PT pint cast, maybe throw in a please. At the end my monitor the -tudents are they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that Cadillac in the clinic. Don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with e that change. Bring the new culture two out there who, who may not know what is new in the research realm. So I really in power them to be that catalyst that change of the freshen taking your from the academic side of things into clinical practice. Get a chance to talk to the greenberg’s. Eric in Elliot Greenberg. No relation. They had a couple of publications about ACL rehab and best practices. We. Best practices, but are those best practices being put into practice? So did there. So they took a look at it from an orthopedic surgeon perspective, physical therapist, perspective, and really, ultimately wanted to see why or why not those best practices were being actually utilized. So we took a talk with those two guys at the same time in this episode take a listen. I think it’s got insights beyond just ACL rehab, right? Re really insights into where’s the fall off in best practice to actual practice. So we’re going to get into that with these guys episode brought to you by Owens recovery, science, a single source for PT’s looking for certification in personalized blood flow, restriction rehabilitation training and the equipment, you need to apply in your clinical practice Zach Ephron on social media, just see. And he’s going through ACL rehab, and using har-. So that’s, that’s kind of cool to see in the mainstream, and he did a little shout to his great physical therapist athletic trainers going through rehab. So check it out, Owens recovery science dot com. If you’d like to get certified. And grab that equipment, we do want to let you know, we have another podcast that’s been launched. N. P T E, study cast, helping students study for the board exams. So check it out wherever podcast or heard. I tunes Google play Spotify. N P, T E, study cast, it is brought to you by our friends at Arias medical staffing without them. We wouldn’t be able to bring it to you. We also have free downloadable study guides for each of the episodes short to the point episodes between three and nine minutes on average about the one hundred fifty most asked about path on the N P. So check that out. N P T study cast, now available ever podcast, hurt the best conversations happen at happy hour, welcome to hours forum award. This is the P T podcasts, here’s your host, physical therapist, Jimmy MacKay the best conversations happen at happy hour. Welcome two hours your next episode of PT podcast starch right now bring it into to grow. Converge do not get confused. They are not related Elliott and Eric Greenberg. Welcome to the show guys. I’d give negative. Thanks. I have an excellent art. So we’ll start with Elliott Elliott. What’s, what’s your background, which are the audience know about you about what, what you do in your daily life daily life? I’ve kind of limit role. I work at children’s Philadelphia about three-quarters clinician, and about one quarter researcher here special interest in knee, and shoulder injuries particular ACL’s, because what I see a lot of glad heavy Elliott and Eric. What’s your superhero back story here, backdoor, the right now? I’m on Long Island and I may. In Europe, at the New York technology where I even the curriculum, it’d be program, but also treat the NYC athlete. And my current interest include working with obviously the population with lower injuries and running related injury. Excellent. So how’d you guys meet anyway? I mean I know you know Elliott, you’re, you’re at shop Philly. Eric, you’re in New York. But have you guys cross paths was was it the same conference and picked up the others name tag because you both have the same last name or what? Yeah, it’s kind of a long story, but. I we unknowingly you know, kinda sorta cross paths, a long time in our in our in our lives together. But we, we did end up. We worked together at shop for a little while. And that’s really how he really got. No each other and work together, and kinda, formerly Egypt. So both of you guys have special interests in lower shrimp, the injuries Elliott working with pediatric and adolescent, sportsmed. Eric doing the same with some college athletes, and being a practicing as well. How did you guys decide to get together and do some research, and then we’ll get into what it was and where the audience can find it. Burqa started on the research paths together while we were together at shop. We did come out with a more retrospective analysis looking at the pediatric strengthen front-row, turn in the pediatric athlete, and then it kind of bird into a little more while, and I remember very closely when Elliott our standing next to each other at CSM, how long it was it remember that in California, I think, when whenever the Anaheim yeah, yeah.

05:15 – 10:04

Book that we has had this idea like, you know, we’re coming out with all these recognitions, but we really don’t know what it is that peaky are actually doing out there in terms of whites, specifically, a C L rehab returned to play return to sport return to life. Yeah. So when we were working together at shop, we do a lot of these functional and strength testing on patients that we weren’t really seeing. And when we were talking to them while they while they were coming in. You were getting again, gambit whole gambit as far as what they were doing regarding every in along with what kind of critique. Syrian that they’re, they’re practicing teachers were using this got us to thinking about, you know, yes, there are recommendations and guidelines out there, but is there that much variability out there in nickel practice? Gotcha. So you’re seeing what all the research was, and that’s what you’re doing at CSM, but you’re saying what’s actually being done, what where’s, where’s the translation? What’s the hand off from research and best practices to what’s actually being done with athletes? Yeah, I think yeah. And I think it also kind of reverse too, because we had that kinda unique experience at shop. Where are surging kind of require their patients to come the are there teams are to make sure they are functional testing program, where they the L part of that is, it’s great because we get interacted patient that we’re not treating on a day-to-day basis, we’re seeing at three months post op or six months and saying, all right. Tell me what you’re doing. And we hear from the patient’s perspective, are they are they following of, like, what we would consider to be best practice guidelines what have they done? Maybe prior to come. In and the patient, assessing aunts. And then, and then we give to CSM we hear what all this really great research is saying, man, we should be doing. We should be doing more. We shouldn’t do, and it’s like, but, you know, the, the patients that we have coming in from outside, our walls, or maybe not even doing happened that too. So it’s like, you know, it really spurred that idea what, what happened was the general practitioner that seeing, you know, maybe mostly maybe low back pain, or older patients when they get kind of SEAL that walkner door, you know, that they may not be a specialist in these the what is what does that person doing to make decisions about returns person, the play I like how it was formulated, organically, guys standing there together at, at CSM and saying, hey, what about this? Why don’t we take a look at the cool part was you guys went and follow through, and you wind up doing it. So, so talk about what happened next after that moment, when you actually follow through, we kind of formulated the idea, and we brought together, what we’ve dealt with a really good team, people with orthopedic surgeons that we work with here at job, and in PT’s, and we kinda got the, the survey. Of what we wanted to the question that we wanted to ask formulated together. And then we thought, hey, great idea, not only look at what therapists are doing. But on the other side, we look at the PD surgeon, they’re doing as well. So he came up with this idea of maybe the three sixty degrees, scope of people that are involved in, in these rehab decision, seeing what if kind of the Philip how to be in the orthopedic surgeons are kind of the overall directors, they’re the ones that are delivering the protocols for their patients. And, you know, saying this is what should be done. You know, we should see what they think about package patterns TT’s, or the one we’re in the trenches were the ones that actually were applying testing. But we feel should be best. You know what is what the P T say we wanted to kind of see what are both sides would say. And then maybe the compare contrast and draw conclusions from that. Unlike the more like a time line and being able to see again, what’s, what’s best practice. That’s great. But what’s actually being done on both ends in terms of the orthopedic surgeons and then the follow through with the, the physical therapists after? The surgery. So, so how’d you guys approach it and, and what you guys fine. Let’s get into the nitty gritty yet for one of the biggest things that we found was that there was a large variability, not physical therapist, but also with the orthopedic surgeon, and I think it really probably under floors, or underestimates, the ability out there, because the sample that we took from was the sports section with exception in private practice section, or what formerly known as those sections, I should say with their new name changes. But it’s a pretty, if you think about it a homogeneous sample of people, you would think that would be in the know of the current landscape of the literature, who would probably under floors, or under made the, the true, very villi out there similarly that we, we found even more variety in the orthopedic population, certain population, and that was the sample of pediatric orthopedic surgeon from the research and sports medicine group prison. Group, once again, a very homogeneous sample that tends to be a little bit more up to date with their with their current recommendation. So we, we were, we were quite quick deprived prize, the degree of Billy that we found, so, so I just want to stop you there to make sure I understand what you’re saying, and make sure the audience gets it too.

10:04 – 15:09

So you’re saying this groups free homogeneous you figured it, would they be more well informed because these are the people who go out of their way to not only be members but to be section or academy members and seek out the research, so they should have been sticking to or at least be closer to the best practice guidelines that have been put forth so far. But you saw variability, which you’re saying really really, really highlights how much variability was out there that you couldn’t even reach at xactly yet. Okay. I just didn’t wanna make sure I, I want to make sure I understood that. So it’s okay that is that is pretty telling what were some of the results you want to get into some of the some of the highlights. And some of the things that you guys found that maybe surprise you or didn’t surprise you. If you think about the decision. Making profits or what you’re the tools. You’re using from, from time based parameters to some type of strength criteria to some type of stumps performance measure to maybe some type of patient outcome measure or psychological attachment or contract dry. I mean, the variation existed across all of those, but even some of the more kind of would you consider maybe more concrete things like time we’re not even agreeing on time when the progress patience right now and you think that there’s probably the better most amount of research looking to support like those simple those, those type of concrete things. But we can’t even agree. And then when you start drilling down into the details about well, are reassessing strength and a lot of everybody agreed like. Yeah. Strength is important. But then we asked, how are you assessing strength that then variability just started from there? Right. And some people there was a large proportion of the sample PT’s that, you know, just relied on manual muscle testing to progress their patients and kind of what the literature showing is that, you know, we’re not going to be able to. Identify these higher levels of gases. Pete that may exist for these patients, when they’re strong but they’re just not strong enough using now montage, tonight’s lesion. But then when people are using either more objective measures, like handle their no mama tree. Or there’s availability rice the testing the standard that which they’re holding them to the variability just continues to progress where some people required seventy five percent. Maybe limbs imaging index and some people were maybe above one hundred percent. It’s there’s just, you know, the organizer surprised they as we drill down. You know, the win the details of what we’re doing and everyday practice, we can agree on broad strokes. We can agree that strengthening important, the man when you start like measuring strength like how you’re actually applying and doing that. That’s really different from everybody. Do you see in the framework is there? But how you actually apply and actually measure things like time or strength, which everyone pretty much agrees on being important factors to take into consideration when you start. Looking even smaller there. That’s where you see even more the very variability come into play. Yeah. Yeah. Eric, what do you want more like the devil? That was in the house a little bit like he talked to finishing tonight and nobody’s gonna argue that strength that meet strength. This is not going to be important. But I think once you start to, to hammer down on to power, they testing or something the strength of, of, of their patients. Are you really comparing apples to apples when when you start to go across different clinics, clinician and patients? And I think it really does create a little bit confusion, not just in the PT population in the clinic population. But Auckland patients to talk with one another, when they’re like, oh, yeah. I think cleared how they took your or yeah, they, they hooked me up to this machine four times. And, and I have to get at least ninety cent and the other person’s like oh, I’ve never done that before. And they’re back on the field plan already. I think it really does create a little bit of confusion within the society as well as are we really treating the same patients across different clinicians in clinic. And practitioners in the same profession. You know, right. That’s and that’s a great example of when you get to patients together, and they say, oh, we have the same injury, we must have done the same type of rehab, or at least hit these big big benchmarks. And when they’re different that’s confusing. And again, I get it, you know, patients are different from patient to patient. But if this is what best practices are, how come there’s so much variability? What were you able to hone in and either measure and ask, or at least if not speculate? Why is it? Why, why do we take it upon ourselves to, to have so much variability within the PT arm of the survey that we thought he’d be able to get one of those details? We, we tried to look at commision doctor that maybe influenced some of their him their decision that the us. So we had we kind of broke people down into, like either, high volume or low volume practitioners, where we said, anybody that treated more than ten miles per year. We accounted for them at high volume. Actitities and those less than that were low volume. We looked at certified specialists versus not certified specialists. And we don’t think years of clinical experience, and you know, if we if we use, we don’t know what that program is or, you know, like like you said, a few times we have our current, you know, Beth standard that we have our practice standard.

15:09 – 20:08

But we know if those are ideal hopefully change as we continue to learn more. But if we lived up to characteristics of the clinicians relative to the decision, they were making it seem like certified specialists were more likely to follow either which beat, of course, board certified specialists more likely to follow those kind of current practice guideline, and also those clinicians that were that were into our high volume clinicians seem to kind of follow more those best practice standards. So jor Beth is kind of what we’ve only result is that meeting. Those conditions are maybe more tied into the current literature or maybe by into the current literature more maybe see the investment in their practice going out. Of the way there, that’s a self selected group, which we started talking about the top of the show. These are people who say when your SAS, or when you’re seeing high volume, I’m I better, I better be doing the best because I’m practices wise because I’m seeing so many of these types of patients, these specific type of patients each and every year variability in terms of testing, I could imagine sometimes would have to do with ability of Quebec. Right. Each practice setting is going to be different. Yeah, definitely. And I think Becky him about a up in some of our speculation that people that had can be high volume a, you know, probably see the investment in an economic Donna, Mamata, or even like a handheld on a monitor roof with someone who may maybe in a facility where they’re not being as many of those types of patients may not be willing to invest in something because there’s no cost benefit for them or return on their investment in the long term. And obviously, there are other financial issues that you come across. Basis issues potentially. So I think there’s a lot of confounding issues that could arrive that can reason why someone is not using this type of instrumentation where can work in the audience, find this and, and download and kind of consumer themselves want to make sure they get access to it. Yes. The PTA survey published in jail at BT in October issue. Twenty eighteen and me surge in order big surgeon arm of the study was just published last month on in the orthopedic journalist sports medicine, Zingo them, and you can download that, that’s a full tech there, you can download full text there. No problem. What, what was the what was some of the attitudes of people who participated in this after the, the results will reveal work were they shocked were they surprised to were they, you know, pledging to, to change their practice because they saw such variability or anything come out of that, you know, I don’t think it was that surprising. I think I think disturbing survey kinda showed what everybody coming, Verdy thought. Victor knew existed that there’s variation out there and everyone’s like, wow, I, I knew it was variable. But I didn’t think it was very -able. You know what I think that was kind of, like just reinforced them the some of the thoughts, we did get a couple of emails from people like saying, hey, this is this is really nice really enjoyed remiss kinda good study, but I don’t know air and different Binyamin that no you know what it was interesting. I think you’ve gotta lar- a lot of publicity on social media platforms almost like the like a shock value of you need to do better. You know, by no means do I think you are. Is it is it bulletproof is it the best thing out there? Is it catching all people who may be at risk? But, but at least it’s the best we have at this point. But it seems if people aren’t even doing that at this point. So how could we really say that it’s not doing what it claims to be doing? If people aren’t there aren’t really doing it. So I think it, it really gained some headway on, on the media platform of saying, hey guys, let’s do a little bit better out there. I like that good. Take a quick break want to thank our sponsors are east medical staffing for keeping the show on the air. They find jobs, whether you’re gonna do so Adelphia or Long Island or anywhere you want to do a beach a lake. He wanna go mountains. He want to ski you can do that. That’s the cool part of variability in our in our profession is people need PT all over. So go do what you want where you want to do it. And Arias get you set up a U, R, E US, medical dot com. Not only just having the positions. But as well as being with a walkie through all the pain points. What do I do if I’m licensed in New York? But I want to go work in California for a couple of months they’ve got people on board to help you walk you through that. So you’re not on your own housing. How do you find where to live and is the person that use hiring you? They pay for that. They’ve got someone to walk you through that as well. The thing that could knit freaked me out the most was taxes. If you live in New York, but you’re temporarily working in Colorado. What do you do again? Arias has someone for that as well. So check them out, if you want to do a short term placement or look into relocate long-term, a U, R, E US medical dot com. Where, where would you guys go if you could go anywhere in the fifty states, if you do exactly what you wanna do what state, haven’t you been to that? You would give shot for thirteen weeks.

20:09 – 25:05

What bait haven’t I been to? Well, I was thinking more of that. I have been to Florida gator, we go down to Pensacola Beach, Florida every odd year for a week, and that is one of my favorite places in the United States. But opera played the haven’t been to having not ally. They had not been there, I would probably pick some somewhere in the mountain bikers aggo could Pacific northwest. Well at school party where the fifty states check him out. You are US medical dot com. Extent stay tuned. The we’ll be right back to the P T on cast. If you look at for education passed your physical therapy degree, look no further than Brooks. H L, Brooks rehabilitation institute of higher learning you could find out more Brooks, I h l dot org continuing education along with residencies and fellowships residencies in Orthopaedics, geriatrics, women’s health, neurologic PT, pediatrics, sports, and fellowship opportunity as well. So look into it if you’re looking to expand your knowledge base Brooks, IHL dot org to the typecast with Jimmy MacKay question. How was the how are the views or how was the reaction you guys mentioned, some kind of shock value on on social media saying, hey, come almost a rallying cry. But we, we need to do better. Let’s do better. Was there any reaction from the orthopedic surgeons since they’re the kind of the first touch point in the patient, and then they pass them off to us betcha they expect us to be doing best practices? What was their reaction to the results? I haven’t seen much reaction to the there’s a lot more talk about it and probably considerable Eric. And I of fly in within the realm when we did present it that at conference. We got a lot of really good feedback. We actually won best paper award at the prison conference the year, we did present this at that conference. I think there was there was a lot of kind of good Baillieu in, in the in the paper and the topics. And you know, we’re hoping that maybe it’s going to help drive Johnston change where beating side and change things around to so, so, so alternately. I guess the question to ask, is how do we do better? You know, we have these academies, now we specialize, we have best practices is there anything that you would that you, if you could make may wave. Magic wand that you put into play. How can we do better? I did a residency at the. I did a residency at the at the university of Delaware did for threatens there under the guidance of insider macadear who’s been acute advocate for the tests. You know, you need to test the folk and there’s been research out there that said, don’t, don’t need an kind of garner monitor to assess quad strikes you all you need is in the extension, machine that every clinic was throwing out a few years back and now the starting to get them out of the trash. So I think it comes down to, you know what take the time out. It’s worth your while for the information that you get just to do repetition, maximum testing if that’s all you have is you have a handheld item ometer, you use both types of testing, but I think it’s taking the time out and maybe sacrificing other parts of your of your treatment to really get the data that you need to make educated decisions. And that’s a valuable thing, right? Giving up some time. But if if, if what you’re presenting his is correct, which we, we would assume that would be since its best practices that time is well, spent, we’ll we’re going to say sorry to cut you off yet. I agree. I think engage in this conversation is actually helpful in getting some of the some of that social media. No on your your, your show. You’ve talked about kind of lag time between evidence to trickle down everyday practice. And I think that the social media conversations really helpful with and they can push us that people probably wouldn’t have picked up the paper or read it beforehand. And there’s there’s so much stuff about about ACL coming out. I mean I mean hundreds of papers every year to try and I get that. But I think trying to just these maybe maybe helped reinforce some of this, you know, the current standard that we think are the best to try to help, you know, get that out to general practitioners that don’t specialize an easy else, but probably Seeven majority of easy L patients because they make up the majority of the general practices that are out there, and maybe helping to adopt you know, the doctor and the guidelines that are that are being put forward. We’ll look at Alex, look the positive at least there are best practices, right? And we’re pushing we’re pushing up professor. Towards finding out what is best that’s great. That’s a great problem to have is. How do we know? How are we going to disseminate that and make sure it gets put into play? At least we got that first part least, we’re really, really paying attention to the first part. Now, if we as you just mentioned, continue to have those conversations, maybe hopefully it’ll help that second part with this emanation last thing. I wanted to ask Eric, you’ve got a unique situation in terms of, of working with students any strategies to encourage students and new clinicians to adopting best practices, and making the change in current practice patterns, to hopefully as they progress in their careers continue that and then teach other students to change the profession.

25:05 – 30:18

Yeah. You know, I had as a an instructor in professor at this point, I tend to utilize a lot of media and podcasts, some of your own actually and other types of logs and things like that after screen through them with my Hyun because I feel like it’s very powerful to hear it from the door at both. So more. Digestible for them than reading the text books. Hearing me talk about it up there. So I utilize that empowers them to get engaged in conversation with the people who are actually putting out literature, and the people who do have experience aside from hearing it from myself as a sage on the stage. I also my mantra to the students are you know they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that, that, that catalyst in the clinic, don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with he that change. Bring the new culture two who’ve been out there who, who may not know what, what is new in the research realm. So I, I really encountered them to be that catalyst that change of the profession, taking it from out of the academic side of things into clinical practice love it. Be the change. Right. It’s not gonna change unless you take what you exactly what it is take what you learn in school, and your clinical rotations and actually, start to do it love that last. Part of the show is the parting shot. It is the parting shot. The Portland shot is brought to you by rock tape more than just the tape company. Rock tape is a movement company, tools and education for medical professionals, if you look at it help, your patients, go stronger longer. Checkout rock tape dot com. You guys have an opportunity to leave one one sentiment with the audience before you go who wants to go first with their partying shop Erica, you kick it off that. All right. So, I guess my parting dot would probably be addictive. Festive, we could do with younger. Patients is its neck with them understand that they’re not an eight the pair, their person who had an affair, and in dealing with kids and dealing with adults. You know you need to manage each person’s differently by using the evidence as your guide, but understanding that you need to tell about intimate independence to the person. And if you could just connect with that person, you’re, you’re, you’re gonna make that person better, regardless of, of. What you do as long as you’re you’re, you’re letting Evan guide you love at Elliot. You’re up and parting shot when he got I think just making sure you continue to grow as a clinician, you know, I think seeing a lot of as the ovation in unfortunately thing, a lot of them hail or have re injury or or secondary injury has has driven me to want to get better. You know. And I think just kind of continuing to grow as condition, and, and, and use those, those events or in that let learning to, to better yourself for the next person around is, is an important thing love that before we go. I’m just you. You’re prescribing podcast episodes, as homework or is outside learning to students love to hear that. I am. I and actually I get made fun of by my other faculty members because of it. But obviously, I listen to a lot of them my forehand. I don’t just give it to them, but I feel like it’s a lot more digestible for them. They can do it while they’re driving into school. They could do it while they’re working out. So. They can work it into their, their everyday life. And it also brings them. They stumble upon other things within that podcast. And it’s more student directed learning after that because they’re like, oh, I listen to this on certain podcast. And then I saw another episode that I was in it really interests me. So it starts to get them on that self directed learning which which is so important for when they do graduate is, how do they, you know, now the information coming to them, they have to go out and seek it? So it teaches them that new skill. You know, selfishly a love to hear that because I host a couple of different podcasts. But I like it because as the as the guy with a degree in communications you’re talking or you’re trying to facilitate a conversation, the way your audience listens. And you’re listening the way your audience talks, and that’s a way to facilitate great conversation instead of what you mentioned earlier being the sage on the stage. That’s a presentation. Right. Some people do learn really well from presentation myself, I’m a conversation guy, obviously. So, you know, selfishly hey, love love to hear that. You’re prescribing assigning podcast episodes, maybe one or two for my show to students, but just love the fact that you’re open to and Anna do want to highlight you mentioned it twice that you do screen through that. Anybody with a microphone create a podcast super easy. But I love the fact that you’re screening it and highlighting. Hey, pay attention to this, and they do after that, if they trip across an episode that hasn’t been screened they need to take that upon themselves because there’s a lot of information in less than great information out there to. Absolutely. I think that’s the most important thing. Is that you’re, you’re, you’re really screening through it to make sure because there’s a lot of stuff out there, that, that maybe you doesn’t really job with the intentions of, of what you want them to get to learn and last point, I’ll make love that too, because once they graduate, they don’t have a professor down the hall or they aren’t running into someone each and every week.

30:19 – 32:32

We’re having that information brought to them, they need to start to seek it out. And think, you know, handing over day of a blog to read or. Podcast, listen to or video channel follow. That’s a great digestible way as we mentioned before, of getting information. Once you start working forty hours a week when you graduate gentlemen, want to say thanks very much for your time. Don’t think it will be the last one. We have you guys on the show, but etc. Service episode with everybody. On the P T cast is a product of p t pint cast LLC it is hosted and produced by p t podcasts. EEO Jim McKay, and CBO sky, Donovan from Marymount university, we talk PT, drink, beer, and record it this has been another poor from the PT pint cast the PD podcasts in ten for educational purposes. Only no clinical decision making should be based solely on one source while Perez, taken to ensure accuracy, factual errors can be present. More on the show at PT podcasts dot com. We’re home on the internet t-, pine cast dot com created by build PT. Build PT provides marketing services, specifically for private practice, PT’s website, development and hosted inviting content marketing solutions PT clinics across the country. See with good PT can do for you. Today dot com. The PT pint cast proudly supports the Travis mills foundation on April tenth twenty twelve United States army staff sergeant Travis mills of the eighty second airborne was critically injured on his third tour of duty in Afghanistan by while on patrol losing portions of both legs, and both arms. He is one of only five quadruple amputees from the wars in Iraq, and Afghanistan to survive his injuries, thanks to his amazing strength, courage, and incredible will to live the heroic actions of the men in his unit. The prayers of thousands and all the healthcare providers at the Walter Reed Army medical center. Travis remains on the road to recovery. He founded the Travis mills foundation, a nonprofit organization formed to benefit and assist. Combat injured. Teran’s. Travis lives by his motto never give up. Never quit to support the Travis mills foundation. Or to find out more visit Travis mills dot org.

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ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg We talk with Eric & Elliot Greenburg (no relation) about ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes.<br /> <br /> Topics hit:<br /> <br /> High rates of ACL injury and repeat injury among youth/adolescent athletes.<br /> <br /> Recent publications of ours that identifying variability of rehabilitation methods in determination of progression of activity following ACL reconstruction among physical therapists and orthopedic surgeons<br /> <br /> Controversy regarding what criteria "should" be used to help determine rehab progression, including return to sports among this population. Translating evidence into practice, which is not occurring according to our survey results. <br /> <br /> How can we optimize rehabilitation in a world of managed care, escalating copays and high deductible insurance plans. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 32:32
From PT to Non-Clinical PT. Ellen Bunn – Telehealth Program Manager https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/05/22/from-pt-to-non-clinical-pt-ellen-bunn-telehealth-program-manager/ Wed, 22 May 2019 09:11:12 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5460 For more information about Ellen at The Non-Clinical PT here: https://thenonclinicalpt.com/clinical-program-manager/

ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg | 2 hrs ago

0:00 – 05:14

Hi, I’m Alexa. You can now hear PT podcast. Using me just say, hey Alexa, launched PT, pint cast, or you could be nice and try saying, please for lunch, what is being polite? Dead these days to your episodes, just say, hey Alexa, launch PT pint cast, maybe throw in a please. At the end my monitor the -tudents are they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that Cadillac in the clinic. Don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with e that change. Bring the new culture two out there who, who may not know what is new in the research realm. So I really in power them to be that catalyst that change of the freshen taking your from the academic side of things into clinical practice. Get a chance to talk to the greenberg’s. Eric in Elliot Greenberg. No relation. They had a couple of publications about ACL rehab and best practices. We. Best practices, but are those best practices being put into practice? So did there. So they took a look at it from an orthopedic surgeon perspective, physical therapist, perspective, and really, ultimately wanted to see why or why not those best practices were being actually utilized. So we took a talk with those two guys at the same time in this episode take a listen. I think it’s got insights beyond just ACL rehab, right? Re really insights into where’s the fall off in best practice to actual practice. So we’re going to get into that with these guys episode brought to you by Owens recovery, science, a single source for PT’s looking for certification in personalized blood flow, restriction rehabilitation training and the equipment, you need to apply in your clinical practice Zach Ephron on social media, just see. And he’s going through ACL rehab, and using har-. So that’s, that’s kind of cool to see in the mainstream, and he did a little shout to his great physical therapist athletic trainers going through rehab. So check it out, Owens recovery science dot com. If you’d like to get certified. And grab that equipment, we do want to let you know, we have another podcast that’s been launched. N. P T E, study cast, helping students study for the board exams. So check it out wherever podcast or heard. I tunes Google play Spotify. N P, T E, study cast, it is brought to you by our friends at Arias medical staffing without them. We wouldn’t be able to bring it to you. We also have free downloadable study guides for each of the episodes short to the point episodes between three and nine minutes on average about the one hundred fifty most asked about path on the N P. So check that out. N P T study cast, now available ever podcast, hurt the best conversations happen at happy hour, welcome to hours forum award. This is the P T podcasts, here’s your host, physical therapist, Jimmy MacKay the best conversations happen at happy hour. Welcome two hours your next episode of PT podcast starch right now bring it into to grow. Converge do not get confused. They are not related Elliott and Eric Greenberg. Welcome to the show guys. I’d give negative. Thanks. I have an excellent art. So we’ll start with Elliott Elliott. What’s, what’s your background, which are the audience know about you about what, what you do in your daily life daily life? I’ve kind of limit role. I work at children’s Philadelphia about three-quarters clinician, and about one quarter researcher here special interest in knee, and shoulder injuries particular ACL’s, because what I see a lot of glad heavy Elliott and Eric. What’s your superhero back story here, backdoor, the right now? I’m on Long Island and I may. In Europe, at the New York technology where I even the curriculum, it’d be program, but also treat the NYC athlete. And my current interest include working with obviously the population with lower injuries and running related injury. Excellent. So how’d you guys meet anyway? I mean I know you know Elliott, you’re, you’re at shop Philly. Eric, you’re in New York. But have you guys cross paths was was it the same conference and picked up the others name tag because you both have the same last name or what? Yeah, it’s kind of a long story, but. I we unknowingly you know, kinda sorta cross paths, a long time in our in our in our lives together. But we, we did end up. We worked together at shop for a little while. And that’s really how he really got. No each other and work together, and kinda, formerly Egypt. So both of you guys have special interests in lower shrimp, the injuries Elliott working with pediatric and adolescent, sportsmed. Eric doing the same with some college athletes, and being a practicing as well. How did you guys decide to get together and do some research, and then we’ll get into what it was and where the audience can find it. Burqa started on the research paths together while we were together at shop. We did come out with a more retrospective analysis looking at the pediatric strengthen front-row, turn in the pediatric athlete, and then it kind of bird into a little more while, and I remember very closely when Elliott our standing next to each other at CSM, how long it was it remember that in California, I think, when whenever the Anaheim yeah, yeah.

05:15 – 10:04

Book that we has had this idea like, you know, we’re coming out with all these recognitions, but we really don’t know what it is that peaky are actually doing out there in terms of whites, specifically, a C L rehab returned to play return to sport return to life. Yeah. So when we were working together at shop, we do a lot of these functional and strength testing on patients that we weren’t really seeing. And when we were talking to them while they while they were coming in. You were getting again, gambit whole gambit as far as what they were doing regarding every in along with what kind of critique. Syrian that they’re, they’re practicing teachers were using this got us to thinking about, you know, yes, there are recommendations and guidelines out there, but is there that much variability out there in nickel practice? Gotcha. So you’re seeing what all the research was, and that’s what you’re doing at CSM, but you’re saying what’s actually being done, what where’s, where’s the translation? What’s the hand off from research and best practices to what’s actually being done with athletes? Yeah, I think yeah. And I think it also kind of reverse too, because we had that kinda unique experience at shop. Where are surging kind of require their patients to come the are there teams are to make sure they are functional testing program, where they the L part of that is, it’s great because we get interacted patient that we’re not treating on a day-to-day basis, we’re seeing at three months post op or six months and saying, all right. Tell me what you’re doing. And we hear from the patient’s perspective, are they are they following of, like, what we would consider to be best practice guidelines what have they done? Maybe prior to come. In and the patient, assessing aunts. And then, and then we give to CSM we hear what all this really great research is saying, man, we should be doing. We should be doing more. We shouldn’t do, and it’s like, but, you know, the, the patients that we have coming in from outside, our walls, or maybe not even doing happened that too. So it’s like, you know, it really spurred that idea what, what happened was the general practitioner that seeing, you know, maybe mostly maybe low back pain, or older patients when they get kind of SEAL that walkner door, you know, that they may not be a specialist in these the what is what does that person doing to make decisions about returns person, the play I like how it was formulated, organically, guys standing there together at, at CSM and saying, hey, what about this? Why don’t we take a look at the cool part was you guys went and follow through, and you wind up doing it. So, so talk about what happened next after that moment, when you actually follow through, we kind of formulated the idea, and we brought together, what we’ve dealt with a really good team, people with orthopedic surgeons that we work with here at job, and in PT’s, and we kinda got the, the survey. Of what we wanted to the question that we wanted to ask formulated together. And then we thought, hey, great idea, not only look at what therapists are doing. But on the other side, we look at the PD surgeon, they’re doing as well. So he came up with this idea of maybe the three sixty degrees, scope of people that are involved in, in these rehab decision, seeing what if kind of the Philip how to be in the orthopedic surgeons are kind of the overall directors, they’re the ones that are delivering the protocols for their patients. And, you know, saying this is what should be done. You know, we should see what they think about package patterns TT’s, or the one we’re in the trenches were the ones that actually were applying testing. But we feel should be best. You know what is what the P T say we wanted to kind of see what are both sides would say. And then maybe the compare contrast and draw conclusions from that. Unlike the more like a time line and being able to see again, what’s, what’s best practice. That’s great. But what’s actually being done on both ends in terms of the orthopedic surgeons and then the follow through with the, the physical therapists after? The surgery. So, so how’d you guys approach it and, and what you guys fine. Let’s get into the nitty gritty yet for one of the biggest things that we found was that there was a large variability, not physical therapist, but also with the orthopedic surgeon, and I think it really probably under floors, or underestimates, the ability out there, because the sample that we took from was the sports section with exception in private practice section, or what formerly known as those sections, I should say with their new name changes. But it’s a pretty, if you think about it a homogeneous sample of people, you would think that would be in the know of the current landscape of the literature, who would probably under floors, or under made the, the true, very villi out there similarly that we, we found even more variety in the orthopedic population, certain population, and that was the sample of pediatric orthopedic surgeon from the research and sports medicine group prison. Group, once again, a very homogeneous sample that tends to be a little bit more up to date with their with their current recommendation. So we, we were, we were quite quick deprived prize, the degree of Billy that we found, so, so I just want to stop you there to make sure I understand what you’re saying, and make sure the audience gets it too.

10:04 – 15:09

So you’re saying this groups free homogeneous you figured it, would they be more well informed because these are the people who go out of their way to not only be members but to be section or academy members and seek out the research, so they should have been sticking to or at least be closer to the best practice guidelines that have been put forth so far. But you saw variability, which you’re saying really really, really highlights how much variability was out there that you couldn’t even reach at xactly yet. Okay. I just didn’t wanna make sure I, I want to make sure I understood that. So it’s okay that is that is pretty telling what were some of the results you want to get into some of the some of the highlights. And some of the things that you guys found that maybe surprise you or didn’t surprise you. If you think about the decision. Making profits or what you’re the tools. You’re using from, from time based parameters to some type of strength criteria to some type of stumps performance measure to maybe some type of patient outcome measure or psychological attachment or contract dry. I mean, the variation existed across all of those, but even some of the more kind of would you consider maybe more concrete things like time we’re not even agreeing on time when the progress patience right now and you think that there’s probably the better most amount of research looking to support like those simple those, those type of concrete things. But we can’t even agree. And then when you start drilling down into the details about well, are reassessing strength and a lot of everybody agreed like. Yeah. Strength is important. But then we asked, how are you assessing strength that then variability just started from there? Right. And some people there was a large proportion of the sample PT’s that, you know, just relied on manual muscle testing to progress their patients and kind of what the literature showing is that, you know, we’re not going to be able to. Identify these higher levels of gases. Pete that may exist for these patients, when they’re strong but they’re just not strong enough using now montage, tonight’s lesion. But then when people are using either more objective measures, like handle their no mama tree. Or there’s availability rice the testing the standard that which they’re holding them to the variability just continues to progress where some people required seventy five percent. Maybe limbs imaging index and some people were maybe above one hundred percent. It’s there’s just, you know, the organizer surprised they as we drill down. You know, the win the details of what we’re doing and everyday practice, we can agree on broad strokes. We can agree that strengthening important, the man when you start like measuring strength like how you’re actually applying and doing that. That’s really different from everybody. Do you see in the framework is there? But how you actually apply and actually measure things like time or strength, which everyone pretty much agrees on being important factors to take into consideration when you start. Looking even smaller there. That’s where you see even more the very variability come into play. Yeah. Yeah. Eric, what do you want more like the devil? That was in the house a little bit like he talked to finishing tonight and nobody’s gonna argue that strength that meet strength. This is not going to be important. But I think once you start to, to hammer down on to power, they testing or something the strength of, of, of their patients. Are you really comparing apples to apples when when you start to go across different clinics, clinician and patients? And I think it really does create a little bit confusion, not just in the PT population in the clinic population. But Auckland patients to talk with one another, when they’re like, oh, yeah. I think cleared how they took your or yeah, they, they hooked me up to this machine four times. And, and I have to get at least ninety cent and the other person’s like oh, I’ve never done that before. And they’re back on the field plan already. I think it really does create a little bit of confusion within the society as well as are we really treating the same patients across different clinicians in clinic. And practitioners in the same profession. You know, right. That’s and that’s a great example of when you get to patients together, and they say, oh, we have the same injury, we must have done the same type of rehab, or at least hit these big big benchmarks. And when they’re different that’s confusing. And again, I get it, you know, patients are different from patient to patient. But if this is what best practices are, how come there’s so much variability? What were you able to hone in and either measure and ask, or at least if not speculate? Why is it? Why, why do we take it upon ourselves to, to have so much variability within the PT arm of the survey that we thought he’d be able to get one of those details? We, we tried to look at commision doctor that maybe influenced some of their him their decision that the us. So we had we kind of broke people down into, like either, high volume or low volume practitioners, where we said, anybody that treated more than ten miles per year. We accounted for them at high volume. Actitities and those less than that were low volume. We looked at certified specialists versus not certified specialists. And we don’t think years of clinical experience, and you know, if we if we use, we don’t know what that program is or, you know, like like you said, a few times we have our current, you know, Beth standard that we have our practice standard.

15:09 – 20:08

But we know if those are ideal hopefully change as we continue to learn more. But if we lived up to characteristics of the clinicians relative to the decision, they were making it seem like certified specialists were more likely to follow either which beat, of course, board certified specialists more likely to follow those kind of current practice guideline, and also those clinicians that were that were into our high volume clinicians seem to kind of follow more those best practice standards. So jor Beth is kind of what we’ve only result is that meeting. Those conditions are maybe more tied into the current literature or maybe by into the current literature more maybe see the investment in their practice going out. Of the way there, that’s a self selected group, which we started talking about the top of the show. These are people who say when your SAS, or when you’re seeing high volume, I’m I better, I better be doing the best because I’m practices wise because I’m seeing so many of these types of patients, these specific type of patients each and every year variability in terms of testing, I could imagine sometimes would have to do with ability of Quebec. Right. Each practice setting is going to be different. Yeah, definitely. And I think Becky him about a up in some of our speculation that people that had can be high volume a, you know, probably see the investment in an economic Donna, Mamata, or even like a handheld on a monitor roof with someone who may maybe in a facility where they’re not being as many of those types of patients may not be willing to invest in something because there’s no cost benefit for them or return on their investment in the long term. And obviously, there are other financial issues that you come across. Basis issues potentially. So I think there’s a lot of confounding issues that could arrive that can reason why someone is not using this type of instrumentation where can work in the audience, find this and, and download and kind of consumer themselves want to make sure they get access to it. Yes. The PTA survey published in jail at BT in October issue. Twenty eighteen and me surge in order big surgeon arm of the study was just published last month on in the orthopedic journalist sports medicine, Zingo them, and you can download that, that’s a full tech there, you can download full text there. No problem. What, what was the what was some of the attitudes of people who participated in this after the, the results will reveal work were they shocked were they surprised to were they, you know, pledging to, to change their practice because they saw such variability or anything come out of that, you know, I don’t think it was that surprising. I think I think disturbing survey kinda showed what everybody coming, Verdy thought. Victor knew existed that there’s variation out there and everyone’s like, wow, I, I knew it was variable. But I didn’t think it was very -able. You know what I think that was kind of, like just reinforced them the some of the thoughts, we did get a couple of emails from people like saying, hey, this is this is really nice really enjoyed remiss kinda good study, but I don’t know air and different Binyamin that no you know what it was interesting. I think you’ve gotta lar- a lot of publicity on social media platforms almost like the like a shock value of you need to do better. You know, by no means do I think you are. Is it is it bulletproof is it the best thing out there? Is it catching all people who may be at risk? But, but at least it’s the best we have at this point. But it seems if people aren’t even doing that at this point. So how could we really say that it’s not doing what it claims to be doing? If people aren’t there aren’t really doing it. So I think it, it really gained some headway on, on the media platform of saying, hey guys, let’s do a little bit better out there. I like that good. Take a quick break want to thank our sponsors are east medical staffing for keeping the show on the air. They find jobs, whether you’re gonna do so Adelphia or Long Island or anywhere you want to do a beach a lake. He wanna go mountains. He want to ski you can do that. That’s the cool part of variability in our in our profession is people need PT all over. So go do what you want where you want to do it. And Arias get you set up a U, R, E US, medical dot com. Not only just having the positions. But as well as being with a walkie through all the pain points. What do I do if I’m licensed in New York? But I want to go work in California for a couple of months they’ve got people on board to help you walk you through that. So you’re not on your own housing. How do you find where to live and is the person that use hiring you? They pay for that. They’ve got someone to walk you through that as well. The thing that could knit freaked me out the most was taxes. If you live in New York, but you’re temporarily working in Colorado. What do you do again? Arias has someone for that as well. So check them out, if you want to do a short term placement or look into relocate long-term, a U, R, E US medical dot com. Where, where would you guys go if you could go anywhere in the fifty states, if you do exactly what you wanna do what state, haven’t you been to that? You would give shot for thirteen weeks.

20:09 – 25:05

What bait haven’t I been to? Well, I was thinking more of that. I have been to Florida gator, we go down to Pensacola Beach, Florida every odd year for a week, and that is one of my favorite places in the United States. But opera played the haven’t been to having not ally. They had not been there, I would probably pick some somewhere in the mountain bikers aggo could Pacific northwest. Well at school party where the fifty states check him out. You are US medical dot com. Extent stay tuned. The we’ll be right back to the P T on cast. If you look at for education passed your physical therapy degree, look no further than Brooks. H L, Brooks rehabilitation institute of higher learning you could find out more Brooks, I h l dot org continuing education along with residencies and fellowships residencies in Orthopaedics, geriatrics, women’s health, neurologic PT, pediatrics, sports, and fellowship opportunity as well. So look into it if you’re looking to expand your knowledge base Brooks, IHL dot org to the typecast with Jimmy MacKay question. How was the how are the views or how was the reaction you guys mentioned, some kind of shock value on on social media saying, hey, come almost a rallying cry. But we, we need to do better. Let’s do better. Was there any reaction from the orthopedic surgeons since they’re the kind of the first touch point in the patient, and then they pass them off to us betcha they expect us to be doing best practices? What was their reaction to the results? I haven’t seen much reaction to the there’s a lot more talk about it and probably considerable Eric. And I of fly in within the realm when we did present it that at conference. We got a lot of really good feedback. We actually won best paper award at the prison conference the year, we did present this at that conference. I think there was there was a lot of kind of good Baillieu in, in the in the paper and the topics. And you know, we’re hoping that maybe it’s going to help drive Johnston change where beating side and change things around to so, so, so alternately. I guess the question to ask, is how do we do better? You know, we have these academies, now we specialize, we have best practices is there anything that you would that you, if you could make may wave. Magic wand that you put into play. How can we do better? I did a residency at the. I did a residency at the at the university of Delaware did for threatens there under the guidance of insider macadear who’s been acute advocate for the tests. You know, you need to test the folk and there’s been research out there that said, don’t, don’t need an kind of garner monitor to assess quad strikes you all you need is in the extension, machine that every clinic was throwing out a few years back and now the starting to get them out of the trash. So I think it comes down to, you know what take the time out. It’s worth your while for the information that you get just to do repetition, maximum testing if that’s all you have is you have a handheld item ometer, you use both types of testing, but I think it’s taking the time out and maybe sacrificing other parts of your of your treatment to really get the data that you need to make educated decisions. And that’s a valuable thing, right? Giving up some time. But if if, if what you’re presenting his is correct, which we, we would assume that would be since its best practices that time is well, spent, we’ll we’re going to say sorry to cut you off yet. I agree. I think engage in this conversation is actually helpful in getting some of the some of that social media. No on your your, your show. You’ve talked about kind of lag time between evidence to trickle down everyday practice. And I think that the social media conversations really helpful with and they can push us that people probably wouldn’t have picked up the paper or read it beforehand. And there’s there’s so much stuff about about ACL coming out. I mean I mean hundreds of papers every year to try and I get that. But I think trying to just these maybe maybe helped reinforce some of this, you know, the current standard that we think are the best to try to help, you know, get that out to general practitioners that don’t specialize an easy else, but probably Seeven majority of easy L patients because they make up the majority of the general practices that are out there, and maybe helping to adopt you know, the doctor and the guidelines that are that are being put forward. We’ll look at Alex, look the positive at least there are best practices, right? And we’re pushing we’re pushing up professor. Towards finding out what is best that’s great. That’s a great problem to have is. How do we know? How are we going to disseminate that and make sure it gets put into play? At least we got that first part least, we’re really, really paying attention to the first part. Now, if we as you just mentioned, continue to have those conversations, maybe hopefully it’ll help that second part with this emanation last thing. I wanted to ask Eric, you’ve got a unique situation in terms of, of working with students any strategies to encourage students and new clinicians to adopting best practices, and making the change in current practice patterns, to hopefully as they progress in their careers continue that and then teach other students to change the profession.

25:05 – 30:18

Yeah. You know, I had as a an instructor in professor at this point, I tend to utilize a lot of media and podcasts, some of your own actually and other types of logs and things like that after screen through them with my Hyun because I feel like it’s very powerful to hear it from the door at both. So more. Digestible for them than reading the text books. Hearing me talk about it up there. So I utilize that empowers them to get engaged in conversation with the people who are actually putting out literature, and the people who do have experience aside from hearing it from myself as a sage on the stage. I also my mantra to the students are you know they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that, that, that catalyst in the clinic, don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with he that change. Bring the new culture two who’ve been out there who, who may not know what, what is new in the research realm. So I, I really encountered them to be that catalyst that change of the profession, taking it from out of the academic side of things into clinical practice love it. Be the change. Right. It’s not gonna change unless you take what you exactly what it is take what you learn in school, and your clinical rotations and actually, start to do it love that last. Part of the show is the parting shot. It is the parting shot. The Portland shot is brought to you by rock tape more than just the tape company. Rock tape is a movement company, tools and education for medical professionals, if you look at it help, your patients, go stronger longer. Checkout rock tape dot com. You guys have an opportunity to leave one one sentiment with the audience before you go who wants to go first with their partying shop Erica, you kick it off that. All right. So, I guess my parting dot would probably be addictive. Festive, we could do with younger. Patients is its neck with them understand that they’re not an eight the pair, their person who had an affair, and in dealing with kids and dealing with adults. You know you need to manage each person’s differently by using the evidence as your guide, but understanding that you need to tell about intimate independence to the person. And if you could just connect with that person, you’re, you’re, you’re gonna make that person better, regardless of, of. What you do as long as you’re you’re, you’re letting Evan guide you love at Elliot. You’re up and parting shot when he got I think just making sure you continue to grow as a clinician, you know, I think seeing a lot of as the ovation in unfortunately thing, a lot of them hail or have re injury or or secondary injury has has driven me to want to get better. You know. And I think just kind of continuing to grow as condition, and, and, and use those, those events or in that let learning to, to better yourself for the next person around is, is an important thing love that before we go. I’m just you. You’re prescribing podcast episodes, as homework or is outside learning to students love to hear that. I am. I and actually I get made fun of by my other faculty members because of it. But obviously, I listen to a lot of them my forehand. I don’t just give it to them, but I feel like it’s a lot more digestible for them. They can do it while they’re driving into school. They could do it while they’re working out. So. They can work it into their, their everyday life. And it also brings them. They stumble upon other things within that podcast. And it’s more student directed learning after that because they’re like, oh, I listen to this on certain podcast. And then I saw another episode that I was in it really interests me. So it starts to get them on that self directed learning which which is so important for when they do graduate is, how do they, you know, now the information coming to them, they have to go out and seek it? So it teaches them that new skill. You know, selfishly a love to hear that because I host a couple of different podcasts. But I like it because as the as the guy with a degree in communications you’re talking or you’re trying to facilitate a conversation, the way your audience listens. And you’re listening the way your audience talks, and that’s a way to facilitate great conversation instead of what you mentioned earlier being the sage on the stage. That’s a presentation. Right. Some people do learn really well from presentation myself, I’m a conversation guy, obviously. So, you know, selfishly hey, love love to hear that. You’re prescribing assigning podcast episodes, maybe one or two for my show to students, but just love the fact that you’re open to and Anna do want to highlight you mentioned it twice that you do screen through that. Anybody with a microphone create a podcast super easy. But I love the fact that you’re screening it and highlighting. Hey, pay attention to this, and they do after that, if they trip across an episode that hasn’t been screened they need to take that upon themselves because there’s a lot of information in less than great information out there to. Absolutely. I think that’s the most important thing. Is that you’re, you’re, you’re really screening through it to make sure because there’s a lot of stuff out there, that, that maybe you doesn’t really job with the intentions of, of what you want them to get to learn and last point, I’ll make love that too, because once they graduate, they don’t have a professor down the hall or they aren’t running into someone each and every week.

30:19 – 32:32

We’re having that information brought to them, they need to start to seek it out. And think, you know, handing over day of a blog to read or. Podcast, listen to or video channel follow. That’s a great digestible way as we mentioned before, of getting information. Once you start working forty hours a week when you graduate gentlemen, want to say thanks very much for your time. Don’t think it will be the last one. We have you guys on the show, but etc. Service episode with everybody. On the P T cast is a product of p t pint cast LLC it is hosted and produced by p t podcasts. EEO Jim McKay, and CBO sky, Donovan from Marymount university, we talk PT, drink, beer, and record it this has been another poor from the PT pint cast the PD podcasts in ten for educational purposes. Only no clinical decision making should be based solely on one source while Perez, taken to ensure accuracy, factual errors can be present. More on the show at PT podcasts dot com. We’re home on the internet t-, pine cast dot com created by build PT. Build PT provides marketing services, specifically for private practice, PT’s website, development and hosted inviting content marketing solutions PT clinics across the country. See with good PT can do for you. Today dot com. The PT pint cast proudly supports the Travis mills foundation on April tenth twenty twelve United States army staff sergeant Travis mills of the eighty second airborne was critically injured on his third tour of duty in Afghanistan by while on patrol losing portions of both legs, and both arms. He is one of only five quadruple amputees from the wars in Iraq, and Afghanistan to survive his injuries, thanks to his amazing strength, courage, and incredible will to live the heroic actions of the men in his unit. The prayers of thousands and all the healthcare providers at the Walter Reed Army medical center. Travis remains on the road to recovery. He founded the Travis mills foundation, a nonprofit organization formed to benefit and assist. Combat injured. Teran’s. Travis lives by his motto never give up. Never quit to support the Travis mills foundation. Or to find out more visit Travis mills dot org.

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ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg We talk with Eric & Elliot Greenburg (no relation) about ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes.<br /> <br /> Topics hit:<br /> <br /> High rates of ACL injury and repeat injury among youth/adolescent athletes.<br /> <br /> Recent publications of ours that identifying variability of rehabilitation methods in determination of progression of activity following ACL reconstruction among physical therapists and orthopedic surgeons<br /> <br /> Controversy regarding what criteria "should" be used to help determine rehab progression, including return to sports among this population. Translating evidence into practice, which is not occurring according to our survey results. <br /> <br /> How can we optimize rehabilitation in a world of managed care, escalating copays and high deductible insurance plans. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 32:32
Fight Medicine with NYU’s Arie Assouline https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/05/21/fight-medicine-with-nyus-arie-assouline/ Tue, 21 May 2019 10:42:48 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5523 Fight Medicine with NYU's Arie Assouline Loved talking with Arie Assouline from NYU on their upcoming FIGHT MEDICINE course. It'll be a 1-day CEU course on June 8th in NYC that will feature PTs MDs and other health care providers covering prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of injuries in combat athletes.<br /> <br /> AND It'll feature MMA legend Randy Couture.<br /> <br /> Details about the class here: https://www.highmarksce.com/nyumc/index.cfm?do=pln.viewActivity&activityCode=239-19 Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 23:07 Scientific Poster Presentations. Why we’re doing it wrong and how to do it better. https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/05/15/scientific-poster-presentations-why-were-doing-it-wrong-and-how-to-do-it-better/ Wed, 15 May 2019 10:13:46 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5510 Scientific Poster Presentations. Why we're doing it wrong and how to do it better. Find the video that inspired this episode here: https://twitter.com/mikemorrison Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 27:40 Utica College LIVE! https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/05/13/utica-college-live/ Mon, 13 May 2019 14:04:14 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5516 Utica College LIVE! We went back to Utica College in NY as part of a student conclave event with the NYPTA. 4 guests were set but we had a last min addition who brought the fire as always. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 53:44 Fighting ALS with ESPN’s Jon Sciambi & Project Main Street https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/05/10/fighting-als-with-espns-jon-sciambi-project-main-street/ Fri, 10 May 2019 22:04:30 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5514 Fighting ALS with ESPN's Jon Sciambi & Project Main Street Get your Gala tickets here: http://projectmainst.org/tim-sheehy-gala-softball-classic/ <br /> Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 15:13 PTJ Editor Alan Jette on precision Physical Therapy https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/05/08/ptj-editor-alan-jette-on-precision-physical-therapy/ Wed, 08 May 2019 10:37:31 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5484 PTJ Editor Alan Jette on precision Physical Therapy Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 10:59 Spotlight on Research: Translating Rotator Cuff-Related Research Into Practice https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/05/06/spotlight-on-research-translating-rotator-cuff-related-research-into-practice/ Mon, 06 May 2019 10:00:30 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5474 Spotlight on Research: Translating Rotator Cuff-Related Research Into Practice We talked with Lori Michner, Amee Seitz and Chuck Thigpen while at CSM in DC 2019. They had a presentation called "Spotlight on Research: Translating Rotator Cuff-Related Research Into Practice" so we talked to them just before they presented on the topic so you could hear their insights on shoulder care even if you weren't at CSM. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 21:39 Fighting Parkinson’s Disease with her fists with Laura Beck https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/04/29/fighting-parkinsons-disease-with-her-fists-with-laura-beck/ Mon, 29 Apr 2019 14:41:51 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5463 Fighting Parkinson's Disease with her fists with Laura Beck Laura Beck is a PT who uses interventions like jabs, right hooks and uppercuts to fight Parkinson's Disease. We look inside her ring to see what she sees. http://pinehurst.rsbaffiliate.com/ Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 24:22 Limb Loss Awareness Month with PT Sam Kelokates https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/04/27/limb-loss-awareness-month-with-pt-sam-kelokates/ Sat, 27 Apr 2019 23:08:00 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5469 We talk Limb Loss Awareness Month with PT Sam Kelokates a PT with Fox Rehabilitation. What you can do as a PT to prevent Limb Loss in your patients, what the effects of Limb Loss and Limb Difference can do to individuals and some personal insights and stats of Limb Loss. Follow Sam on twitter @5PhantomFingers

ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg | 2 hrs ago

0:00 – 05:14

Hi, I’m Alexa. You can now hear PT podcast. Using me just say, hey Alexa, launched PT, pint cast, or you could be nice and try saying, please for lunch, what is being polite? Dead these days to your episodes, just say, hey Alexa, launch PT pint cast, maybe throw in a please. At the end my monitor the -tudents are they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that Cadillac in the clinic. Don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with e that change. Bring the new culture two out there who, who may not know what is new in the research realm. So I really in power them to be that catalyst that change of the freshen taking your from the academic side of things into clinical practice. Get a chance to talk to the greenberg’s. Eric in Elliot Greenberg. No relation. They had a couple of publications about ACL rehab and best practices. We. Best practices, but are those best practices being put into practice? So did there. So they took a look at it from an orthopedic surgeon perspective, physical therapist, perspective, and really, ultimately wanted to see why or why not those best practices were being actually utilized. So we took a talk with those two guys at the same time in this episode take a listen. I think it’s got insights beyond just ACL rehab, right? Re really insights into where’s the fall off in best practice to actual practice. So we’re going to get into that with these guys episode brought to you by Owens recovery, science, a single source for PT’s looking for certification in personalized blood flow, restriction rehabilitation training and the equipment, you need to apply in your clinical practice Zach Ephron on social media, just see. And he’s going through ACL rehab, and using har-. So that’s, that’s kind of cool to see in the mainstream, and he did a little shout to his great physical therapist athletic trainers going through rehab. So check it out, Owens recovery science dot com. If you’d like to get certified. And grab that equipment, we do want to let you know, we have another podcast that’s been launched. N. P T E, study cast, helping students study for the board exams. So check it out wherever podcast or heard. I tunes Google play Spotify. N P, T E, study cast, it is brought to you by our friends at Arias medical staffing without them. We wouldn’t be able to bring it to you. We also have free downloadable study guides for each of the episodes short to the point episodes between three and nine minutes on average about the one hundred fifty most asked about path on the N P. So check that out. N P T study cast, now available ever podcast, hurt the best conversations happen at happy hour, welcome to hours forum award. This is the P T podcasts, here’s your host, physical therapist, Jimmy MacKay the best conversations happen at happy hour. Welcome two hours your next episode of PT podcast starch right now bring it into to grow. Converge do not get confused. They are not related Elliott and Eric Greenberg. Welcome to the show guys. I’d give negative. Thanks. I have an excellent art. So we’ll start with Elliott Elliott. What’s, what’s your background, which are the audience know about you about what, what you do in your daily life daily life? I’ve kind of limit role. I work at children’s Philadelphia about three-quarters clinician, and about one quarter researcher here special interest in knee, and shoulder injuries particular ACL’s, because what I see a lot of glad heavy Elliott and Eric. What’s your superhero back story here, backdoor, the right now? I’m on Long Island and I may. In Europe, at the New York technology where I even the curriculum, it’d be program, but also treat the NYC athlete. And my current interest include working with obviously the population with lower injuries and running related injury. Excellent. So how’d you guys meet anyway? I mean I know you know Elliott, you’re, you’re at shop Philly. Eric, you’re in New York. But have you guys cross paths was was it the same conference and picked up the others name tag because you both have the same last name or what? Yeah, it’s kind of a long story, but. I we unknowingly you know, kinda sorta cross paths, a long time in our in our in our lives together. But we, we did end up. We worked together at shop for a little while. And that’s really how he really got. No each other and work together, and kinda, formerly Egypt. So both of you guys have special interests in lower shrimp, the injuries Elliott working with pediatric and adolescent, sportsmed. Eric doing the same with some college athletes, and being a practicing as well. How did you guys decide to get together and do some research, and then we’ll get into what it was and where the audience can find it. Burqa started on the research paths together while we were together at shop. We did come out with a more retrospective analysis looking at the pediatric strengthen front-row, turn in the pediatric athlete, and then it kind of bird into a little more while, and I remember very closely when Elliott our standing next to each other at CSM, how long it was it remember that in California, I think, when whenever the Anaheim yeah, yeah.

05:15 – 10:04

Book that we has had this idea like, you know, we’re coming out with all these recognitions, but we really don’t know what it is that peaky are actually doing out there in terms of whites, specifically, a C L rehab returned to play return to sport return to life. Yeah. So when we were working together at shop, we do a lot of these functional and strength testing on patients that we weren’t really seeing. And when we were talking to them while they while they were coming in. You were getting again, gambit whole gambit as far as what they were doing regarding every in along with what kind of critique. Syrian that they’re, they’re practicing teachers were using this got us to thinking about, you know, yes, there are recommendations and guidelines out there, but is there that much variability out there in nickel practice? Gotcha. So you’re seeing what all the research was, and that’s what you’re doing at CSM, but you’re saying what’s actually being done, what where’s, where’s the translation? What’s the hand off from research and best practices to what’s actually being done with athletes? Yeah, I think yeah. And I think it also kind of reverse too, because we had that kinda unique experience at shop. Where are surging kind of require their patients to come the are there teams are to make sure they are functional testing program, where they the L part of that is, it’s great because we get interacted patient that we’re not treating on a day-to-day basis, we’re seeing at three months post op or six months and saying, all right. Tell me what you’re doing. And we hear from the patient’s perspective, are they are they following of, like, what we would consider to be best practice guidelines what have they done? Maybe prior to come. In and the patient, assessing aunts. And then, and then we give to CSM we hear what all this really great research is saying, man, we should be doing. We should be doing more. We shouldn’t do, and it’s like, but, you know, the, the patients that we have coming in from outside, our walls, or maybe not even doing happened that too. So it’s like, you know, it really spurred that idea what, what happened was the general practitioner that seeing, you know, maybe mostly maybe low back pain, or older patients when they get kind of SEAL that walkner door, you know, that they may not be a specialist in these the what is what does that person doing to make decisions about returns person, the play I like how it was formulated, organically, guys standing there together at, at CSM and saying, hey, what about this? Why don’t we take a look at the cool part was you guys went and follow through, and you wind up doing it. So, so talk about what happened next after that moment, when you actually follow through, we kind of formulated the idea, and we brought together, what we’ve dealt with a really good team, people with orthopedic surgeons that we work with here at job, and in PT’s, and we kinda got the, the survey. Of what we wanted to the question that we wanted to ask formulated together. And then we thought, hey, great idea, not only look at what therapists are doing. But on the other side, we look at the PD surgeon, they’re doing as well. So he came up with this idea of maybe the three sixty degrees, scope of people that are involved in, in these rehab decision, seeing what if kind of the Philip how to be in the orthopedic surgeons are kind of the overall directors, they’re the ones that are delivering the protocols for their patients. And, you know, saying this is what should be done. You know, we should see what they think about package patterns TT’s, or the one we’re in the trenches were the ones that actually were applying testing. But we feel should be best. You know what is what the P T say we wanted to kind of see what are both sides would say. And then maybe the compare contrast and draw conclusions from that. Unlike the more like a time line and being able to see again, what’s, what’s best practice. That’s great. But what’s actually being done on both ends in terms of the orthopedic surgeons and then the follow through with the, the physical therapists after? The surgery. So, so how’d you guys approach it and, and what you guys fine. Let’s get into the nitty gritty yet for one of the biggest things that we found was that there was a large variability, not physical therapist, but also with the orthopedic surgeon, and I think it really probably under floors, or underestimates, the ability out there, because the sample that we took from was the sports section with exception in private practice section, or what formerly known as those sections, I should say with their new name changes. But it’s a pretty, if you think about it a homogeneous sample of people, you would think that would be in the know of the current landscape of the literature, who would probably under floors, or under made the, the true, very villi out there similarly that we, we found even more variety in the orthopedic population, certain population, and that was the sample of pediatric orthopedic surgeon from the research and sports medicine group prison. Group, once again, a very homogeneous sample that tends to be a little bit more up to date with their with their current recommendation. So we, we were, we were quite quick deprived prize, the degree of Billy that we found, so, so I just want to stop you there to make sure I understand what you’re saying, and make sure the audience gets it too.

10:04 – 15:09

So you’re saying this groups free homogeneous you figured it, would they be more well informed because these are the people who go out of their way to not only be members but to be section or academy members and seek out the research, so they should have been sticking to or at least be closer to the best practice guidelines that have been put forth so far. But you saw variability, which you’re saying really really, really highlights how much variability was out there that you couldn’t even reach at xactly yet. Okay. I just didn’t wanna make sure I, I want to make sure I understood that. So it’s okay that is that is pretty telling what were some of the results you want to get into some of the some of the highlights. And some of the things that you guys found that maybe surprise you or didn’t surprise you. If you think about the decision. Making profits or what you’re the tools. You’re using from, from time based parameters to some type of strength criteria to some type of stumps performance measure to maybe some type of patient outcome measure or psychological attachment or contract dry. I mean, the variation existed across all of those, but even some of the more kind of would you consider maybe more concrete things like time we’re not even agreeing on time when the progress patience right now and you think that there’s probably the better most amount of research looking to support like those simple those, those type of concrete things. But we can’t even agree. And then when you start drilling down into the details about well, are reassessing strength and a lot of everybody agreed like. Yeah. Strength is important. But then we asked, how are you assessing strength that then variability just started from there? Right. And some people there was a large proportion of the sample PT’s that, you know, just relied on manual muscle testing to progress their patients and kind of what the literature showing is that, you know, we’re not going to be able to. Identify these higher levels of gases. Pete that may exist for these patients, when they’re strong but they’re just not strong enough using now montage, tonight’s lesion. But then when people are using either more objective measures, like handle their no mama tree. Or there’s availability rice the testing the standard that which they’re holding them to the variability just continues to progress where some people required seventy five percent. Maybe limbs imaging index and some people were maybe above one hundred percent. It’s there’s just, you know, the organizer surprised they as we drill down. You know, the win the details of what we’re doing and everyday practice, we can agree on broad strokes. We can agree that strengthening important, the man when you start like measuring strength like how you’re actually applying and doing that. That’s really different from everybody. Do you see in the framework is there? But how you actually apply and actually measure things like time or strength, which everyone pretty much agrees on being important factors to take into consideration when you start. Looking even smaller there. That’s where you see even more the very variability come into play. Yeah. Yeah. Eric, what do you want more like the devil? That was in the house a little bit like he talked to finishing tonight and nobody’s gonna argue that strength that meet strength. This is not going to be important. But I think once you start to, to hammer down on to power, they testing or something the strength of, of, of their patients. Are you really comparing apples to apples when when you start to go across different clinics, clinician and patients? And I think it really does create a little bit confusion, not just in the PT population in the clinic population. But Auckland patients to talk with one another, when they’re like, oh, yeah. I think cleared how they took your or yeah, they, they hooked me up to this machine four times. And, and I have to get at least ninety cent and the other person’s like oh, I’ve never done that before. And they’re back on the field plan already. I think it really does create a little bit of confusion within the society as well as are we really treating the same patients across different clinicians in clinic. And practitioners in the same profession. You know, right. That’s and that’s a great example of when you get to patients together, and they say, oh, we have the same injury, we must have done the same type of rehab, or at least hit these big big benchmarks. And when they’re different that’s confusing. And again, I get it, you know, patients are different from patient to patient. But if this is what best practices are, how come there’s so much variability? What were you able to hone in and either measure and ask, or at least if not speculate? Why is it? Why, why do we take it upon ourselves to, to have so much variability within the PT arm of the survey that we thought he’d be able to get one of those details? We, we tried to look at commision doctor that maybe influenced some of their him their decision that the us. So we had we kind of broke people down into, like either, high volume or low volume practitioners, where we said, anybody that treated more than ten miles per year. We accounted for them at high volume. Actitities and those less than that were low volume. We looked at certified specialists versus not certified specialists. And we don’t think years of clinical experience, and you know, if we if we use, we don’t know what that program is or, you know, like like you said, a few times we have our current, you know, Beth standard that we have our practice standard.

15:09 – 20:08

But we know if those are ideal hopefully change as we continue to learn more. But if we lived up to characteristics of the clinicians relative to the decision, they were making it seem like certified specialists were more likely to follow either which beat, of course, board certified specialists more likely to follow those kind of current practice guideline, and also those clinicians that were that were into our high volume clinicians seem to kind of follow more those best practice standards. So jor Beth is kind of what we’ve only result is that meeting. Those conditions are maybe more tied into the current literature or maybe by into the current literature more maybe see the investment in their practice going out. Of the way there, that’s a self selected group, which we started talking about the top of the show. These are people who say when your SAS, or when you’re seeing high volume, I’m I better, I better be doing the best because I’m practices wise because I’m seeing so many of these types of patients, these specific type of patients each and every year variability in terms of testing, I could imagine sometimes would have to do with ability of Quebec. Right. Each practice setting is going to be different. Yeah, definitely. And I think Becky him about a up in some of our speculation that people that had can be high volume a, you know, probably see the investment in an economic Donna, Mamata, or even like a handheld on a monitor roof with someone who may maybe in a facility where they’re not being as many of those types of patients may not be willing to invest in something because there’s no cost benefit for them or return on their investment in the long term. And obviously, there are other financial issues that you come across. Basis issues potentially. So I think there’s a lot of confounding issues that could arrive that can reason why someone is not using this type of instrumentation where can work in the audience, find this and, and download and kind of consumer themselves want to make sure they get access to it. Yes. The PTA survey published in jail at BT in October issue. Twenty eighteen and me surge in order big surgeon arm of the study was just published last month on in the orthopedic journalist sports medicine, Zingo them, and you can download that, that’s a full tech there, you can download full text there. No problem. What, what was the what was some of the attitudes of people who participated in this after the, the results will reveal work were they shocked were they surprised to were they, you know, pledging to, to change their practice because they saw such variability or anything come out of that, you know, I don’t think it was that surprising. I think I think disturbing survey kinda showed what everybody coming, Verdy thought. Victor knew existed that there’s variation out there and everyone’s like, wow, I, I knew it was variable. But I didn’t think it was very -able. You know what I think that was kind of, like just reinforced them the some of the thoughts, we did get a couple of emails from people like saying, hey, this is this is really nice really enjoyed remiss kinda good study, but I don’t know air and different Binyamin that no you know what it was interesting. I think you’ve gotta lar- a lot of publicity on social media platforms almost like the like a shock value of you need to do better. You know, by no means do I think you are. Is it is it bulletproof is it the best thing out there? Is it catching all people who may be at risk? But, but at least it’s the best we have at this point. But it seems if people aren’t even doing that at this point. So how could we really say that it’s not doing what it claims to be doing? If people aren’t there aren’t really doing it. So I think it, it really gained some headway on, on the media platform of saying, hey guys, let’s do a little bit better out there. I like that good. Take a quick break want to thank our sponsors are east medical staffing for keeping the show on the air. They find jobs, whether you’re gonna do so Adelphia or Long Island or anywhere you want to do a beach a lake. He wanna go mountains. He want to ski you can do that. That’s the cool part of variability in our in our profession is people need PT all over. So go do what you want where you want to do it. And Arias get you set up a U, R, E US, medical dot com. Not only just having the positions. But as well as being with a walkie through all the pain points. What do I do if I’m licensed in New York? But I want to go work in California for a couple of months they’ve got people on board to help you walk you through that. So you’re not on your own housing. How do you find where to live and is the person that use hiring you? They pay for that. They’ve got someone to walk you through that as well. The thing that could knit freaked me out the most was taxes. If you live in New York, but you’re temporarily working in Colorado. What do you do again? Arias has someone for that as well. So check them out, if you want to do a short term placement or look into relocate long-term, a U, R, E US medical dot com. Where, where would you guys go if you could go anywhere in the fifty states, if you do exactly what you wanna do what state, haven’t you been to that? You would give shot for thirteen weeks.

20:09 – 25:05

What bait haven’t I been to? Well, I was thinking more of that. I have been to Florida gator, we go down to Pensacola Beach, Florida every odd year for a week, and that is one of my favorite places in the United States. But opera played the haven’t been to having not ally. They had not been there, I would probably pick some somewhere in the mountain bikers aggo could Pacific northwest. Well at school party where the fifty states check him out. You are US medical dot com. Extent stay tuned. The we’ll be right back to the P T on cast. If you look at for education passed your physical therapy degree, look no further than Brooks. H L, Brooks rehabilitation institute of higher learning you could find out more Brooks, I h l dot org continuing education along with residencies and fellowships residencies in Orthopaedics, geriatrics, women’s health, neurologic PT, pediatrics, sports, and fellowship opportunity as well. So look into it if you’re looking to expand your knowledge base Brooks, IHL dot org to the typecast with Jimmy MacKay question. How was the how are the views or how was the reaction you guys mentioned, some kind of shock value on on social media saying, hey, come almost a rallying cry. But we, we need to do better. Let’s do better. Was there any reaction from the orthopedic surgeons since they’re the kind of the first touch point in the patient, and then they pass them off to us betcha they expect us to be doing best practices? What was their reaction to the results? I haven’t seen much reaction to the there’s a lot more talk about it and probably considerable Eric. And I of fly in within the realm when we did present it that at conference. We got a lot of really good feedback. We actually won best paper award at the prison conference the year, we did present this at that conference. I think there was there was a lot of kind of good Baillieu in, in the in the paper and the topics. And you know, we’re hoping that maybe it’s going to help drive Johnston change where beating side and change things around to so, so, so alternately. I guess the question to ask, is how do we do better? You know, we have these academies, now we specialize, we have best practices is there anything that you would that you, if you could make may wave. Magic wand that you put into play. How can we do better? I did a residency at the. I did a residency at the at the university of Delaware did for threatens there under the guidance of insider macadear who’s been acute advocate for the tests. You know, you need to test the folk and there’s been research out there that said, don’t, don’t need an kind of garner monitor to assess quad strikes you all you need is in the extension, machine that every clinic was throwing out a few years back and now the starting to get them out of the trash. So I think it comes down to, you know what take the time out. It’s worth your while for the information that you get just to do repetition, maximum testing if that’s all you have is you have a handheld item ometer, you use both types of testing, but I think it’s taking the time out and maybe sacrificing other parts of your of your treatment to really get the data that you need to make educated decisions. And that’s a valuable thing, right? Giving up some time. But if if, if what you’re presenting his is correct, which we, we would assume that would be since its best practices that time is well, spent, we’ll we’re going to say sorry to cut you off yet. I agree. I think engage in this conversation is actually helpful in getting some of the some of that social media. No on your your, your show. You’ve talked about kind of lag time between evidence to trickle down everyday practice. And I think that the social media conversations really helpful with and they can push us that people probably wouldn’t have picked up the paper or read it beforehand. And there’s there’s so much stuff about about ACL coming out. I mean I mean hundreds of papers every year to try and I get that. But I think trying to just these maybe maybe helped reinforce some of this, you know, the current standard that we think are the best to try to help, you know, get that out to general practitioners that don’t specialize an easy else, but probably Seeven majority of easy L patients because they make up the majority of the general practices that are out there, and maybe helping to adopt you know, the doctor and the guidelines that are that are being put forward. We’ll look at Alex, look the positive at least there are best practices, right? And we’re pushing we’re pushing up professor. Towards finding out what is best that’s great. That’s a great problem to have is. How do we know? How are we going to disseminate that and make sure it gets put into play? At least we got that first part least, we’re really, really paying attention to the first part. Now, if we as you just mentioned, continue to have those conversations, maybe hopefully it’ll help that second part with this emanation last thing. I wanted to ask Eric, you’ve got a unique situation in terms of, of working with students any strategies to encourage students and new clinicians to adopting best practices, and making the change in current practice patterns, to hopefully as they progress in their careers continue that and then teach other students to change the profession.

25:05 – 30:18

Yeah. You know, I had as a an instructor in professor at this point, I tend to utilize a lot of media and podcasts, some of your own actually and other types of logs and things like that after screen through them with my Hyun because I feel like it’s very powerful to hear it from the door at both. So more. Digestible for them than reading the text books. Hearing me talk about it up there. So I utilize that empowers them to get engaged in conversation with the people who are actually putting out literature, and the people who do have experience aside from hearing it from myself as a sage on the stage. I also my mantra to the students are you know they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that, that, that catalyst in the clinic, don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with he that change. Bring the new culture two who’ve been out there who, who may not know what, what is new in the research realm. So I, I really encountered them to be that catalyst that change of the profession, taking it from out of the academic side of things into clinical practice love it. Be the change. Right. It’s not gonna change unless you take what you exactly what it is take what you learn in school, and your clinical rotations and actually, start to do it love that last. Part of the show is the parting shot. It is the parting shot. The Portland shot is brought to you by rock tape more than just the tape company. Rock tape is a movement company, tools and education for medical professionals, if you look at it help, your patients, go stronger longer. Checkout rock tape dot com. You guys have an opportunity to leave one one sentiment with the audience before you go who wants to go first with their partying shop Erica, you kick it off that. All right. So, I guess my parting dot would probably be addictive. Festive, we could do with younger. Patients is its neck with them understand that they’re not an eight the pair, their person who had an affair, and in dealing with kids and dealing with adults. You know you need to manage each person’s differently by using the evidence as your guide, but understanding that you need to tell about intimate independence to the person. And if you could just connect with that person, you’re, you’re, you’re gonna make that person better, regardless of, of. What you do as long as you’re you’re, you’re letting Evan guide you love at Elliot. You’re up and parting shot when he got I think just making sure you continue to grow as a clinician, you know, I think seeing a lot of as the ovation in unfortunately thing, a lot of them hail or have re injury or or secondary injury has has driven me to want to get better. You know. And I think just kind of continuing to grow as condition, and, and, and use those, those events or in that let learning to, to better yourself for the next person around is, is an important thing love that before we go. I’m just you. You’re prescribing podcast episodes, as homework or is outside learning to students love to hear that. I am. I and actually I get made fun of by my other faculty members because of it. But obviously, I listen to a lot of them my forehand. I don’t just give it to them, but I feel like it’s a lot more digestible for them. They can do it while they’re driving into school. They could do it while they’re working out. So. They can work it into their, their everyday life. And it also brings them. They stumble upon other things within that podcast. And it’s more student directed learning after that because they’re like, oh, I listen to this on certain podcast. And then I saw another episode that I was in it really interests me. So it starts to get them on that self directed learning which which is so important for when they do graduate is, how do they, you know, now the information coming to them, they have to go out and seek it? So it teaches them that new skill. You know, selfishly a love to hear that because I host a couple of different podcasts. But I like it because as the as the guy with a degree in communications you’re talking or you’re trying to facilitate a conversation, the way your audience listens. And you’re listening the way your audience talks, and that’s a way to facilitate great conversation instead of what you mentioned earlier being the sage on the stage. That’s a presentation. Right. Some people do learn really well from presentation myself, I’m a conversation guy, obviously. So, you know, selfishly hey, love love to hear that. You’re prescribing assigning podcast episodes, maybe one or two for my show to students, but just love the fact that you’re open to and Anna do want to highlight you mentioned it twice that you do screen through that. Anybody with a microphone create a podcast super easy. But I love the fact that you’re screening it and highlighting. Hey, pay attention to this, and they do after that, if they trip across an episode that hasn’t been screened they need to take that upon themselves because there’s a lot of information in less than great information out there to. Absolutely. I think that’s the most important thing. Is that you’re, you’re, you’re really screening through it to make sure because there’s a lot of stuff out there, that, that maybe you doesn’t really job with the intentions of, of what you want them to get to learn and last point, I’ll make love that too, because once they graduate, they don’t have a professor down the hall or they aren’t running into someone each and every week.

30:19 – 32:32

We’re having that information brought to them, they need to start to seek it out. And think, you know, handing over day of a blog to read or. Podcast, listen to or video channel follow. That’s a great digestible way as we mentioned before, of getting information. Once you start working forty hours a week when you graduate gentlemen, want to say thanks very much for your time. Don’t think it will be the last one. We have you guys on the show, but etc. Service episode with everybody. On the P T cast is a product of p t pint cast LLC it is hosted and produced by p t podcasts. EEO Jim McKay, and CBO sky, Donovan from Marymount university, we talk PT, drink, beer, and record it this has been another poor from the PT pint cast the PD podcasts in ten for educational purposes. Only no clinical decision making should be based solely on one source while Perez, taken to ensure accuracy, factual errors can be present. More on the show at PT podcasts dot com. We’re home on the internet t-, pine cast dot com created by build PT. Build PT provides marketing services, specifically for private practice, PT’s website, development and hosted inviting content marketing solutions PT clinics across the country. See with good PT can do for you. Today dot com. The PT pint cast proudly supports the Travis mills foundation on April tenth twenty twelve United States army staff sergeant Travis mills of the eighty second airborne was critically injured on his third tour of duty in Afghanistan by while on patrol losing portions of both legs, and both arms. He is one of only five quadruple amputees from the wars in Iraq, and Afghanistan to survive his injuries, thanks to his amazing strength, courage, and incredible will to live the heroic actions of the men in his unit. The prayers of thousands and all the healthcare providers at the Walter Reed Army medical center. Travis remains on the road to recovery. He founded the Travis mills foundation, a nonprofit organization formed to benefit and assist. Combat injured. Teran’s. Travis lives by his motto never give up. Never quit to support the Travis mills foundation. Or to find out more visit Travis mills dot org.

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ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg We talk with Eric & Elliot Greenburg (no relation) about ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes.<br /> <br /> Topics hit:<br /> <br /> High rates of ACL injury and repeat injury among youth/adolescent athletes.<br /> <br /> Recent publications of ours that identifying variability of rehabilitation methods in determination of progression of activity following ACL reconstruction among physical therapists and orthopedic surgeons<br /> <br /> Controversy regarding what criteria "should" be used to help determine rehab progression, including return to sports among this population. Translating evidence into practice, which is not occurring according to our survey results. <br /> <br /> How can we optimize rehabilitation in a world of managed care, escalating copays and high deductible insurance plans. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 32:32
How to communicate science without sounding like an ass with David Putrino https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/04/24/how-to-communicate-science-without-sounding-like-an-ass-with-david-putrino/ Wed, 24 Apr 2019 09:50:24 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5456 David Putrino digs into two guys who were trying to communicate nutrition science on the Joe Rogan show. But they fell prey to many of the pitfalls that people wind up falling into when trying to talk about science in public. David breaks down what went wrong, and what could have gone right.

ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg | 2 hrs ago

0:00 – 05:14

Hi, I’m Alexa. You can now hear PT podcast. Using me just say, hey Alexa, launched PT, pint cast, or you could be nice and try saying, please for lunch, what is being polite? Dead these days to your episodes, just say, hey Alexa, launch PT pint cast, maybe throw in a please. At the end my monitor the -tudents are they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that Cadillac in the clinic. Don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with e that change. Bring the new culture two out there who, who may not know what is new in the research realm. So I really in power them to be that catalyst that change of the freshen taking your from the academic side of things into clinical practice. Get a chance to talk to the greenberg’s. Eric in Elliot Greenberg. No relation. They had a couple of publications about ACL rehab and best practices. We. Best practices, but are those best practices being put into practice? So did there. So they took a look at it from an orthopedic surgeon perspective, physical therapist, perspective, and really, ultimately wanted to see why or why not those best practices were being actually utilized. So we took a talk with those two guys at the same time in this episode take a listen. I think it’s got insights beyond just ACL rehab, right? Re really insights into where’s the fall off in best practice to actual practice. So we’re going to get into that with these guys episode brought to you by Owens recovery, science, a single source for PT’s looking for certification in personalized blood flow, restriction rehabilitation training and the equipment, you need to apply in your clinical practice Zach Ephron on social media, just see. And he’s going through ACL rehab, and using har-. So that’s, that’s kind of cool to see in the mainstream, and he did a little shout to his great physical therapist athletic trainers going through rehab. So check it out, Owens recovery science dot com. If you’d like to get certified. And grab that equipment, we do want to let you know, we have another podcast that’s been launched. N. P T E, study cast, helping students study for the board exams. So check it out wherever podcast or heard. I tunes Google play Spotify. N P, T E, study cast, it is brought to you by our friends at Arias medical staffing without them. We wouldn’t be able to bring it to you. We also have free downloadable study guides for each of the episodes short to the point episodes between three and nine minutes on average about the one hundred fifty most asked about path on the N P. So check that out. N P T study cast, now available ever podcast, hurt the best conversations happen at happy hour, welcome to hours forum award. This is the P T podcasts, here’s your host, physical therapist, Jimmy MacKay the best conversations happen at happy hour. Welcome two hours your next episode of PT podcast starch right now bring it into to grow. Converge do not get confused. They are not related Elliott and Eric Greenberg. Welcome to the show guys. I’d give negative. Thanks. I have an excellent art. So we’ll start with Elliott Elliott. What’s, what’s your background, which are the audience know about you about what, what you do in your daily life daily life? I’ve kind of limit role. I work at children’s Philadelphia about three-quarters clinician, and about one quarter researcher here special interest in knee, and shoulder injuries particular ACL’s, because what I see a lot of glad heavy Elliott and Eric. What’s your superhero back story here, backdoor, the right now? I’m on Long Island and I may. In Europe, at the New York technology where I even the curriculum, it’d be program, but also treat the NYC athlete. And my current interest include working with obviously the population with lower injuries and running related injury. Excellent. So how’d you guys meet anyway? I mean I know you know Elliott, you’re, you’re at shop Philly. Eric, you’re in New York. But have you guys cross paths was was it the same conference and picked up the others name tag because you both have the same last name or what? Yeah, it’s kind of a long story, but. I we unknowingly you know, kinda sorta cross paths, a long time in our in our in our lives together. But we, we did end up. We worked together at shop for a little while. And that’s really how he really got. No each other and work together, and kinda, formerly Egypt. So both of you guys have special interests in lower shrimp, the injuries Elliott working with pediatric and adolescent, sportsmed. Eric doing the same with some college athletes, and being a practicing as well. How did you guys decide to get together and do some research, and then we’ll get into what it was and where the audience can find it. Burqa started on the research paths together while we were together at shop. We did come out with a more retrospective analysis looking at the pediatric strengthen front-row, turn in the pediatric athlete, and then it kind of bird into a little more while, and I remember very closely when Elliott our standing next to each other at CSM, how long it was it remember that in California, I think, when whenever the Anaheim yeah, yeah.

05:15 – 10:04

Book that we has had this idea like, you know, we’re coming out with all these recognitions, but we really don’t know what it is that peaky are actually doing out there in terms of whites, specifically, a C L rehab returned to play return to sport return to life. Yeah. So when we were working together at shop, we do a lot of these functional and strength testing on patients that we weren’t really seeing. And when we were talking to them while they while they were coming in. You were getting again, gambit whole gambit as far as what they were doing regarding every in along with what kind of critique. Syrian that they’re, they’re practicing teachers were using this got us to thinking about, you know, yes, there are recommendations and guidelines out there, but is there that much variability out there in nickel practice? Gotcha. So you’re seeing what all the research was, and that’s what you’re doing at CSM, but you’re saying what’s actually being done, what where’s, where’s the translation? What’s the hand off from research and best practices to what’s actually being done with athletes? Yeah, I think yeah. And I think it also kind of reverse too, because we had that kinda unique experience at shop. Where are surging kind of require their patients to come the are there teams are to make sure they are functional testing program, where they the L part of that is, it’s great because we get interacted patient that we’re not treating on a day-to-day basis, we’re seeing at three months post op or six months and saying, all right. Tell me what you’re doing. And we hear from the patient’s perspective, are they are they following of, like, what we would consider to be best practice guidelines what have they done? Maybe prior to come. In and the patient, assessing aunts. And then, and then we give to CSM we hear what all this really great research is saying, man, we should be doing. We should be doing more. We shouldn’t do, and it’s like, but, you know, the, the patients that we have coming in from outside, our walls, or maybe not even doing happened that too. So it’s like, you know, it really spurred that idea what, what happened was the general practitioner that seeing, you know, maybe mostly maybe low back pain, or older patients when they get kind of SEAL that walkner door, you know, that they may not be a specialist in these the what is what does that person doing to make decisions about returns person, the play I like how it was formulated, organically, guys standing there together at, at CSM and saying, hey, what about this? Why don’t we take a look at the cool part was you guys went and follow through, and you wind up doing it. So, so talk about what happened next after that moment, when you actually follow through, we kind of formulated the idea, and we brought together, what we’ve dealt with a really good team, people with orthopedic surgeons that we work with here at job, and in PT’s, and we kinda got the, the survey. Of what we wanted to the question that we wanted to ask formulated together. And then we thought, hey, great idea, not only look at what therapists are doing. But on the other side, we look at the PD surgeon, they’re doing as well. So he came up with this idea of maybe the three sixty degrees, scope of people that are involved in, in these rehab decision, seeing what if kind of the Philip how to be in the orthopedic surgeons are kind of the overall directors, they’re the ones that are delivering the protocols for their patients. And, you know, saying this is what should be done. You know, we should see what they think about package patterns TT’s, or the one we’re in the trenches were the ones that actually were applying testing. But we feel should be best. You know what is what the P T say we wanted to kind of see what are both sides would say. And then maybe the compare contrast and draw conclusions from that. Unlike the more like a time line and being able to see again, what’s, what’s best practice. That’s great. But what’s actually being done on both ends in terms of the orthopedic surgeons and then the follow through with the, the physical therapists after? The surgery. So, so how’d you guys approach it and, and what you guys fine. Let’s get into the nitty gritty yet for one of the biggest things that we found was that there was a large variability, not physical therapist, but also with the orthopedic surgeon, and I think it really probably under floors, or underestimates, the ability out there, because the sample that we took from was the sports section with exception in private practice section, or what formerly known as those sections, I should say with their new name changes. But it’s a pretty, if you think about it a homogeneous sample of people, you would think that would be in the know of the current landscape of the literature, who would probably under floors, or under made the, the true, very villi out there similarly that we, we found even more variety in the orthopedic population, certain population, and that was the sample of pediatric orthopedic surgeon from the research and sports medicine group prison. Group, once again, a very homogeneous sample that tends to be a little bit more up to date with their with their current recommendation. So we, we were, we were quite quick deprived prize, the degree of Billy that we found, so, so I just want to stop you there to make sure I understand what you’re saying, and make sure the audience gets it too.

10:04 – 15:09

So you’re saying this groups free homogeneous you figured it, would they be more well informed because these are the people who go out of their way to not only be members but to be section or academy members and seek out the research, so they should have been sticking to or at least be closer to the best practice guidelines that have been put forth so far. But you saw variability, which you’re saying really really, really highlights how much variability was out there that you couldn’t even reach at xactly yet. Okay. I just didn’t wanna make sure I, I want to make sure I understood that. So it’s okay that is that is pretty telling what were some of the results you want to get into some of the some of the highlights. And some of the things that you guys found that maybe surprise you or didn’t surprise you. If you think about the decision. Making profits or what you’re the tools. You’re using from, from time based parameters to some type of strength criteria to some type of stumps performance measure to maybe some type of patient outcome measure or psychological attachment or contract dry. I mean, the variation existed across all of those, but even some of the more kind of would you consider maybe more concrete things like time we’re not even agreeing on time when the progress patience right now and you think that there’s probably the better most amount of research looking to support like those simple those, those type of concrete things. But we can’t even agree. And then when you start drilling down into the details about well, are reassessing strength and a lot of everybody agreed like. Yeah. Strength is important. But then we asked, how are you assessing strength that then variability just started from there? Right. And some people there was a large proportion of the sample PT’s that, you know, just relied on manual muscle testing to progress their patients and kind of what the literature showing is that, you know, we’re not going to be able to. Identify these higher levels of gases. Pete that may exist for these patients, when they’re strong but they’re just not strong enough using now montage, tonight’s lesion. But then when people are using either more objective measures, like handle their no mama tree. Or there’s availability rice the testing the standard that which they’re holding them to the variability just continues to progress where some people required seventy five percent. Maybe limbs imaging index and some people were maybe above one hundred percent. It’s there’s just, you know, the organizer surprised they as we drill down. You know, the win the details of what we’re doing and everyday practice, we can agree on broad strokes. We can agree that strengthening important, the man when you start like measuring strength like how you’re actually applying and doing that. That’s really different from everybody. Do you see in the framework is there? But how you actually apply and actually measure things like time or strength, which everyone pretty much agrees on being important factors to take into consideration when you start. Looking even smaller there. That’s where you see even more the very variability come into play. Yeah. Yeah. Eric, what do you want more like the devil? That was in the house a little bit like he talked to finishing tonight and nobody’s gonna argue that strength that meet strength. This is not going to be important. But I think once you start to, to hammer down on to power, they testing or something the strength of, of, of their patients. Are you really comparing apples to apples when when you start to go across different clinics, clinician and patients? And I think it really does create a little bit confusion, not just in the PT population in the clinic population. But Auckland patients to talk with one another, when they’re like, oh, yeah. I think cleared how they took your or yeah, they, they hooked me up to this machine four times. And, and I have to get at least ninety cent and the other person’s like oh, I’ve never done that before. And they’re back on the field plan already. I think it really does create a little bit of confusion within the society as well as are we really treating the same patients across different clinicians in clinic. And practitioners in the same profession. You know, right. That’s and that’s a great example of when you get to patients together, and they say, oh, we have the same injury, we must have done the same type of rehab, or at least hit these big big benchmarks. And when they’re different that’s confusing. And again, I get it, you know, patients are different from patient to patient. But if this is what best practices are, how come there’s so much variability? What were you able to hone in and either measure and ask, or at least if not speculate? Why is it? Why, why do we take it upon ourselves to, to have so much variability within the PT arm of the survey that we thought he’d be able to get one of those details? We, we tried to look at commision doctor that maybe influenced some of their him their decision that the us. So we had we kind of broke people down into, like either, high volume or low volume practitioners, where we said, anybody that treated more than ten miles per year. We accounted for them at high volume. Actitities and those less than that were low volume. We looked at certified specialists versus not certified specialists. And we don’t think years of clinical experience, and you know, if we if we use, we don’t know what that program is or, you know, like like you said, a few times we have our current, you know, Beth standard that we have our practice standard.

15:09 – 20:08

But we know if those are ideal hopefully change as we continue to learn more. But if we lived up to characteristics of the clinicians relative to the decision, they were making it seem like certified specialists were more likely to follow either which beat, of course, board certified specialists more likely to follow those kind of current practice guideline, and also those clinicians that were that were into our high volume clinicians seem to kind of follow more those best practice standards. So jor Beth is kind of what we’ve only result is that meeting. Those conditions are maybe more tied into the current literature or maybe by into the current literature more maybe see the investment in their practice going out. Of the way there, that’s a self selected group, which we started talking about the top of the show. These are people who say when your SAS, or when you’re seeing high volume, I’m I better, I better be doing the best because I’m practices wise because I’m seeing so many of these types of patients, these specific type of patients each and every year variability in terms of testing, I could imagine sometimes would have to do with ability of Quebec. Right. Each practice setting is going to be different. Yeah, definitely. And I think Becky him about a up in some of our speculation that people that had can be high volume a, you know, probably see the investment in an economic Donna, Mamata, or even like a handheld on a monitor roof with someone who may maybe in a facility where they’re not being as many of those types of patients may not be willing to invest in something because there’s no cost benefit for them or return on their investment in the long term. And obviously, there are other financial issues that you come across. Basis issues potentially. So I think there’s a lot of confounding issues that could arrive that can reason why someone is not using this type of instrumentation where can work in the audience, find this and, and download and kind of consumer themselves want to make sure they get access to it. Yes. The PTA survey published in jail at BT in October issue. Twenty eighteen and me surge in order big surgeon arm of the study was just published last month on in the orthopedic journalist sports medicine, Zingo them, and you can download that, that’s a full tech there, you can download full text there. No problem. What, what was the what was some of the attitudes of people who participated in this after the, the results will reveal work were they shocked were they surprised to were they, you know, pledging to, to change their practice because they saw such variability or anything come out of that, you know, I don’t think it was that surprising. I think I think disturbing survey kinda showed what everybody coming, Verdy thought. Victor knew existed that there’s variation out there and everyone’s like, wow, I, I knew it was variable. But I didn’t think it was very -able. You know what I think that was kind of, like just reinforced them the some of the thoughts, we did get a couple of emails from people like saying, hey, this is this is really nice really enjoyed remiss kinda good study, but I don’t know air and different Binyamin that no you know what it was interesting. I think you’ve gotta lar- a lot of publicity on social media platforms almost like the like a shock value of you need to do better. You know, by no means do I think you are. Is it is it bulletproof is it the best thing out there? Is it catching all people who may be at risk? But, but at least it’s the best we have at this point. But it seems if people aren’t even doing that at this point. So how could we really say that it’s not doing what it claims to be doing? If people aren’t there aren’t really doing it. So I think it, it really gained some headway on, on the media platform of saying, hey guys, let’s do a little bit better out there. I like that good. Take a quick break want to thank our sponsors are east medical staffing for keeping the show on the air. They find jobs, whether you’re gonna do so Adelphia or Long Island or anywhere you want to do a beach a lake. He wanna go mountains. He want to ski you can do that. That’s the cool part of variability in our in our profession is people need PT all over. So go do what you want where you want to do it. And Arias get you set up a U, R, E US, medical dot com. Not only just having the positions. But as well as being with a walkie through all the pain points. What do I do if I’m licensed in New York? But I want to go work in California for a couple of months they’ve got people on board to help you walk you through that. So you’re not on your own housing. How do you find where to live and is the person that use hiring you? They pay for that. They’ve got someone to walk you through that as well. The thing that could knit freaked me out the most was taxes. If you live in New York, but you’re temporarily working in Colorado. What do you do again? Arias has someone for that as well. So check them out, if you want to do a short term placement or look into relocate long-term, a U, R, E US medical dot com. Where, where would you guys go if you could go anywhere in the fifty states, if you do exactly what you wanna do what state, haven’t you been to that? You would give shot for thirteen weeks.

20:09 – 25:05

What bait haven’t I been to? Well, I was thinking more of that. I have been to Florida gator, we go down to Pensacola Beach, Florida every odd year for a week, and that is one of my favorite places in the United States. But opera played the haven’t been to having not ally. They had not been there, I would probably pick some somewhere in the mountain bikers aggo could Pacific northwest. Well at school party where the fifty states check him out. You are US medical dot com. Extent stay tuned. The we’ll be right back to the P T on cast. If you look at for education passed your physical therapy degree, look no further than Brooks. H L, Brooks rehabilitation institute of higher learning you could find out more Brooks, I h l dot org continuing education along with residencies and fellowships residencies in Orthopaedics, geriatrics, women’s health, neurologic PT, pediatrics, sports, and fellowship opportunity as well. So look into it if you’re looking to expand your knowledge base Brooks, IHL dot org to the typecast with Jimmy MacKay question. How was the how are the views or how was the reaction you guys mentioned, some kind of shock value on on social media saying, hey, come almost a rallying cry. But we, we need to do better. Let’s do better. Was there any reaction from the orthopedic surgeons since they’re the kind of the first touch point in the patient, and then they pass them off to us betcha they expect us to be doing best practices? What was their reaction to the results? I haven’t seen much reaction to the there’s a lot more talk about it and probably considerable Eric. And I of fly in within the realm when we did present it that at conference. We got a lot of really good feedback. We actually won best paper award at the prison conference the year, we did present this at that conference. I think there was there was a lot of kind of good Baillieu in, in the in the paper and the topics. And you know, we’re hoping that maybe it’s going to help drive Johnston change where beating side and change things around to so, so, so alternately. I guess the question to ask, is how do we do better? You know, we have these academies, now we specialize, we have best practices is there anything that you would that you, if you could make may wave. Magic wand that you put into play. How can we do better? I did a residency at the. I did a residency at the at the university of Delaware did for threatens there under the guidance of insider macadear who’s been acute advocate for the tests. You know, you need to test the folk and there’s been research out there that said, don’t, don’t need an kind of garner monitor to assess quad strikes you all you need is in the extension, machine that every clinic was throwing out a few years back and now the starting to get them out of the trash. So I think it comes down to, you know what take the time out. It’s worth your while for the information that you get just to do repetition, maximum testing if that’s all you have is you have a handheld item ometer, you use both types of testing, but I think it’s taking the time out and maybe sacrificing other parts of your of your treatment to really get the data that you need to make educated decisions. And that’s a valuable thing, right? Giving up some time. But if if, if what you’re presenting his is correct, which we, we would assume that would be since its best practices that time is well, spent, we’ll we’re going to say sorry to cut you off yet. I agree. I think engage in this conversation is actually helpful in getting some of the some of that social media. No on your your, your show. You’ve talked about kind of lag time between evidence to trickle down everyday practice. And I think that the social media conversations really helpful with and they can push us that people probably wouldn’t have picked up the paper or read it beforehand. And there’s there’s so much stuff about about ACL coming out. I mean I mean hundreds of papers every year to try and I get that. But I think trying to just these maybe maybe helped reinforce some of this, you know, the current standard that we think are the best to try to help, you know, get that out to general practitioners that don’t specialize an easy else, but probably Seeven majority of easy L patients because they make up the majority of the general practices that are out there, and maybe helping to adopt you know, the doctor and the guidelines that are that are being put forward. We’ll look at Alex, look the positive at least there are best practices, right? And we’re pushing we’re pushing up professor. Towards finding out what is best that’s great. That’s a great problem to have is. How do we know? How are we going to disseminate that and make sure it gets put into play? At least we got that first part least, we’re really, really paying attention to the first part. Now, if we as you just mentioned, continue to have those conversations, maybe hopefully it’ll help that second part with this emanation last thing. I wanted to ask Eric, you’ve got a unique situation in terms of, of working with students any strategies to encourage students and new clinicians to adopting best practices, and making the change in current practice patterns, to hopefully as they progress in their careers continue that and then teach other students to change the profession.

25:05 – 30:18

Yeah. You know, I had as a an instructor in professor at this point, I tend to utilize a lot of media and podcasts, some of your own actually and other types of logs and things like that after screen through them with my Hyun because I feel like it’s very powerful to hear it from the door at both. So more. Digestible for them than reading the text books. Hearing me talk about it up there. So I utilize that empowers them to get engaged in conversation with the people who are actually putting out literature, and the people who do have experience aside from hearing it from myself as a sage on the stage. I also my mantra to the students are you know they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that, that, that catalyst in the clinic, don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with he that change. Bring the new culture two who’ve been out there who, who may not know what, what is new in the research realm. So I, I really encountered them to be that catalyst that change of the profession, taking it from out of the academic side of things into clinical practice love it. Be the change. Right. It’s not gonna change unless you take what you exactly what it is take what you learn in school, and your clinical rotations and actually, start to do it love that last. Part of the show is the parting shot. It is the parting shot. The Portland shot is brought to you by rock tape more than just the tape company. Rock tape is a movement company, tools and education for medical professionals, if you look at it help, your patients, go stronger longer. Checkout rock tape dot com. You guys have an opportunity to leave one one sentiment with the audience before you go who wants to go first with their partying shop Erica, you kick it off that. All right. So, I guess my parting dot would probably be addictive. Festive, we could do with younger. Patients is its neck with them understand that they’re not an eight the pair, their person who had an affair, and in dealing with kids and dealing with adults. You know you need to manage each person’s differently by using the evidence as your guide, but understanding that you need to tell about intimate independence to the person. And if you could just connect with that person, you’re, you’re, you’re gonna make that person better, regardless of, of. What you do as long as you’re you’re, you’re letting Evan guide you love at Elliot. You’re up and parting shot when he got I think just making sure you continue to grow as a clinician, you know, I think seeing a lot of as the ovation in unfortunately thing, a lot of them hail or have re injury or or secondary injury has has driven me to want to get better. You know. And I think just kind of continuing to grow as condition, and, and, and use those, those events or in that let learning to, to better yourself for the next person around is, is an important thing love that before we go. I’m just you. You’re prescribing podcast episodes, as homework or is outside learning to students love to hear that. I am. I and actually I get made fun of by my other faculty members because of it. But obviously, I listen to a lot of them my forehand. I don’t just give it to them, but I feel like it’s a lot more digestible for them. They can do it while they’re driving into school. They could do it while they’re working out. So. They can work it into their, their everyday life. And it also brings them. They stumble upon other things within that podcast. And it’s more student directed learning after that because they’re like, oh, I listen to this on certain podcast. And then I saw another episode that I was in it really interests me. So it starts to get them on that self directed learning which which is so important for when they do graduate is, how do they, you know, now the information coming to them, they have to go out and seek it? So it teaches them that new skill. You know, selfishly a love to hear that because I host a couple of different podcasts. But I like it because as the as the guy with a degree in communications you’re talking or you’re trying to facilitate a conversation, the way your audience listens. And you’re listening the way your audience talks, and that’s a way to facilitate great conversation instead of what you mentioned earlier being the sage on the stage. That’s a presentation. Right. Some people do learn really well from presentation myself, I’m a conversation guy, obviously. So, you know, selfishly hey, love love to hear that. You’re prescribing assigning podcast episodes, maybe one or two for my show to students, but just love the fact that you’re open to and Anna do want to highlight you mentioned it twice that you do screen through that. Anybody with a microphone create a podcast super easy. But I love the fact that you’re screening it and highlighting. Hey, pay attention to this, and they do after that, if they trip across an episode that hasn’t been screened they need to take that upon themselves because there’s a lot of information in less than great information out there to. Absolutely. I think that’s the most important thing. Is that you’re, you’re, you’re really screening through it to make sure because there’s a lot of stuff out there, that, that maybe you doesn’t really job with the intentions of, of what you want them to get to learn and last point, I’ll make love that too, because once they graduate, they don’t have a professor down the hall or they aren’t running into someone each and every week.

30:19 – 32:32

We’re having that information brought to them, they need to start to seek it out. And think, you know, handing over day of a blog to read or. Podcast, listen to or video channel follow. That’s a great digestible way as we mentioned before, of getting information. Once you start working forty hours a week when you graduate gentlemen, want to say thanks very much for your time. Don’t think it will be the last one. We have you guys on the show, but etc. Service episode with everybody. On the P T cast is a product of p t pint cast LLC it is hosted and produced by p t podcasts. EEO Jim McKay, and CBO sky, Donovan from Marymount university, we talk PT, drink, beer, and record it this has been another poor from the PT pint cast the PD podcasts in ten for educational purposes. Only no clinical decision making should be based solely on one source while Perez, taken to ensure accuracy, factual errors can be present. More on the show at PT podcasts dot com. We’re home on the internet t-, pine cast dot com created by build PT. Build PT provides marketing services, specifically for private practice, PT’s website, development and hosted inviting content marketing solutions PT clinics across the country. See with good PT can do for you. Today dot com. The PT pint cast proudly supports the Travis mills foundation on April tenth twenty twelve United States army staff sergeant Travis mills of the eighty second airborne was critically injured on his third tour of duty in Afghanistan by while on patrol losing portions of both legs, and both arms. He is one of only five quadruple amputees from the wars in Iraq, and Afghanistan to survive his injuries, thanks to his amazing strength, courage, and incredible will to live the heroic actions of the men in his unit. The prayers of thousands and all the healthcare providers at the Walter Reed Army medical center. Travis remains on the road to recovery. He founded the Travis mills foundation, a nonprofit organization formed to benefit and assist. Combat injured. Teran’s. Travis lives by his motto never give up. Never quit to support the Travis mills foundation. Or to find out more visit Travis mills dot org.

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ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg We talk with Eric & Elliot Greenburg (no relation) about ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes.<br /> <br /> Topics hit:<br /> <br /> High rates of ACL injury and repeat injury among youth/adolescent athletes.<br /> <br /> Recent publications of ours that identifying variability of rehabilitation methods in determination of progression of activity following ACL reconstruction among physical therapists and orthopedic surgeons<br /> <br /> Controversy regarding what criteria "should" be used to help determine rehab progression, including return to sports among this population. Translating evidence into practice, which is not occurring according to our survey results. <br /> <br /> How can we optimize rehabilitation in a world of managed care, escalating copays and high deductible insurance plans. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 32:32
The QB Docs – PT + SC + QB https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/04/22/the-qb-docs-pt-sc-qb/ Mon, 22 Apr 2019 10:06:08 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5448 The QB Docs - PT + SC + QB Drew and Dusty Kiel are former QBs and current PTs and SC pros! They have found a great way to combine all three of their passions and directly connect with their audience who are QB's who want to be better QB's!<br /> <br /> They have their own podcast that can be heard here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-qb-docs-podcast/id1412198618<br /> Their website is here: http://theqbdocs.com/ Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 34:27 G, The Mayor of Manos – Rerelease from 2016 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/04/18/g-the-mayor-of-manos-rerelease-from-2016/ Thu, 18 Apr 2019 15:02:14 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5445 G, The Mayor of Manos - Rerelease from 2016 Originally released when Pintcast host Jimmy McKay was a 3rd year PT student in 2016. It recounts the story of meeting a boy with Muscular Dystrophy in an orphanage in Costa Rica. Knowing that a power wheelchair was: 1 - What he needed but 2 - Not something he'd ever get... without the support of PTs from around the world!<br /> <br /> Jimmy has said "THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT STORY I EVER TOLD! And what kept me from leaving the profession." Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 1:01:57 Wheelchair Seating & Mobility lessons with Jennith Bernstein https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/04/18/wheelchair-seating-mobility-lessons-with-jennith-bernstein/ Thu, 18 Apr 2019 14:51:56 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5443 Wheelchair Seating & Mobility lessons with Jennith Bernstein We talk with Permobil's Jennith Bernstein about the PT's role in Wheelchair Seating and Mobility. <br /> <br /> Jimmy talks about one of the BIGGEST moments of his life and this podcast, when he was able to deliver a Permobil wheelchair to a boy in Costa Rica and how Permobil was able to make that happen. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 35:56 #TBT – The Prehab Guys on PT & Social Media https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/04/11/tbt-the-prehab-guys-on-pt-social-media/ Thu, 11 Apr 2019 09:00:45 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5440 #TBT - The Prehab Guys on PT & Social Media We #TBT to this episode from 2018 with 66% of @ThePrehabGuys from 2018.<br /> <br /> In this episode, Jimmy talks to Arash & Craig, two of the three Prehab Guys, as they stand at the edge of 100k followers on Instagram. The Prehab Guys (students out of USC) show you how to exercise...simply. They tell us about raising PT awareness, getting people to move, and long distance relationships. (Shout out to Michael Lau in China!) For their bios & episode highlights, click here. Check out their new website here. PT Pintcast proudly poured by Aureus Medical. Travel & direct hire opportunities nationwide. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 27:37 Happy Biomechanics Day! With Irene Davis & Cara Lewis. https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/04/10/happy-biomechanics-day-with-irene-davis-cara-lewis/ Wed, 10 Apr 2019 13:59:42 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5438 Happy Biomechanics Day! With Irene Davis & Cara Lewis Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 44:03 LIVE @ Elon University NCPTA! Part 2 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/04/08/live-elon-university-ncpta-part-2/ Mon, 08 Apr 2019 10:50:45 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5422 Wanna thank Brooks rehabilitation there institute of higher learning for sponsoring the show. Residency and fellowship opportunities is what they offer check them out at Brooks, IHL dot org. Also hosting their fourth annual scholarly symposium that's going on June twenty second in Jacksonville, Florida information about the symposium can be found at Brooks. I h l dot org. Keynote presentation this year by the editor of p t j Allan jetty. I'll be on hand doing some talks and some live podcasting looking for C E U's into expand your knowledge base. Look, no further than Brooks, IHL dot org. Was lucky enough to be invited to the North Carolina physical Therapy Association annual conference students put this programming on himself. Last year was Duke got a chance to be there and this year at Elon university. So actually break this up into two parts it was a little longer. Listen to a couple of interviews. Listen to our first two interviews in part one. And we'll follow it up with two hundred years in part to just a lot of excitement. Seeing a lot of students do this and putting on their own conferences that their own program doing it all themselves so excited to see the next generation of physical, therapists, taking the pawn themselves to decide what they're learning and how they're learning it and super set of that they're actually choosing to learn together. So a bunch of North Carolina PT programs are represented a lot of good fun. And take a listen, get some great advice for some people in our profession. First round is brought to you by Owens recovery. Science a single source for looking for certification personalized blood flow restriction. Nation training and the equipment you need to apply. Find them online at Owens recovery. Science dot com. Ladies and gentlemen. Our next guest is a at the Greg odd center for physical therapy, sports, performance leader, and multinational and state committees. And task forces husband, his father beautiful daughter here for well-stoked. What's your what's your three sentence? Bio a passionate physical therapists with drive to not only progress himself, but colleagues and peers to do whatever that is that they want to do typically in situations where they've been told they can't have a lot of experiences with being being told. No. So by who you know. And this is a great place to get this conversation because. Because it's the only place they're going to give us a have a conversation being being roomful students as a student. You get you get told a lot. If you go to conferences, where there's physical therapist there is sometimes if you want to insert yourself into a situation, they say you can't do that. You're just a student or you can't participate. You're just a student or even even as you become a clinician that you're you're pretty green behind the waited for a couple of years. It's not the things you want to hear when you're being told in conferences, and classes, you know, follow your dreams, which you want to do it so easy, then you get out in the in the field, and they're like, Nope. Can't do that a lot of red tape. So that that drives me that's the fire beneath everything that I want to do that. I try to do is you don't tell me. No. You know? Come from a pretty humble family. And my dad was in the police my mom's a teacher, and they were able to send me to school without loans people here for the parents on that one. Who's your role model? My sister, my baby sister when I say baby sister, she's twenty two. But to meet us, my baby sister talking about someone who was told. No couldn't do something. My sister's the only living soul survivor of the most deadliest fungal infection in the world pause what? Yeah. Right. Big mouthful Schwartz story. She and her best friend Roan the way to the beach right after high school graduation went out towards Fort Bragg, down towards the coast, big big military base and were t-boned by humvee at that point.

ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg | 2 hrs ago

0:00 – 05:14

Hi, I’m Alexa. You can now hear PT podcast. Using me just say, hey Alexa, launched PT, pint cast, or you could be nice and try saying, please for lunch, what is being polite? Dead these days to your episodes, just say, hey Alexa, launch PT pint cast, maybe throw in a please. At the end my monitor the -tudents are they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that Cadillac in the clinic. Don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with e that change. Bring the new culture two out there who, who may not know what is new in the research realm. So I really in power them to be that catalyst that change of the freshen taking your from the academic side of things into clinical practice. Get a chance to talk to the greenberg’s. Eric in Elliot Greenberg. No relation. They had a couple of publications about ACL rehab and best practices. We. Best practices, but are those best practices being put into practice? So did there. So they took a look at it from an orthopedic surgeon perspective, physical therapist, perspective, and really, ultimately wanted to see why or why not those best practices were being actually utilized. So we took a talk with those two guys at the same time in this episode take a listen. I think it’s got insights beyond just ACL rehab, right? Re really insights into where’s the fall off in best practice to actual practice. So we’re going to get into that with these guys episode brought to you by Owens recovery, science, a single source for PT’s looking for certification in personalized blood flow, restriction rehabilitation training and the equipment, you need to apply in your clinical practice Zach Ephron on social media, just see. And he’s going through ACL rehab, and using har-. So that’s, that’s kind of cool to see in the mainstream, and he did a little shout to his great physical therapist athletic trainers going through rehab. So check it out, Owens recovery science dot com. If you’d like to get certified. And grab that equipment, we do want to let you know, we have another podcast that’s been launched. N. P T E, study cast, helping students study for the board exams. So check it out wherever podcast or heard. I tunes Google play Spotify. N P, T E, study cast, it is brought to you by our friends at Arias medical staffing without them. We wouldn’t be able to bring it to you. We also have free downloadable study guides for each of the episodes short to the point episodes between three and nine minutes on average about the one hundred fifty most asked about path on the N P. So check that out. N P T study cast, now available ever podcast, hurt the best conversations happen at happy hour, welcome to hours forum award. This is the P T podcasts, here’s your host, physical therapist, Jimmy MacKay the best conversations happen at happy hour. Welcome two hours your next episode of PT podcast starch right now bring it into to grow. Converge do not get confused. They are not related Elliott and Eric Greenberg. Welcome to the show guys. I’d give negative. Thanks. I have an excellent art. So we’ll start with Elliott Elliott. What’s, what’s your background, which are the audience know about you about what, what you do in your daily life daily life? I’ve kind of limit role. I work at children’s Philadelphia about three-quarters clinician, and about one quarter researcher here special interest in knee, and shoulder injuries particular ACL’s, because what I see a lot of glad heavy Elliott and Eric. What’s your superhero back story here, backdoor, the right now? I’m on Long Island and I may. In Europe, at the New York technology where I even the curriculum, it’d be program, but also treat the NYC athlete. And my current interest include working with obviously the population with lower injuries and running related injury. Excellent. So how’d you guys meet anyway? I mean I know you know Elliott, you’re, you’re at shop Philly. Eric, you’re in New York. But have you guys cross paths was was it the same conference and picked up the others name tag because you both have the same last name or what? Yeah, it’s kind of a long story, but. I we unknowingly you know, kinda sorta cross paths, a long time in our in our in our lives together. But we, we did end up. We worked together at shop for a little while. And that’s really how he really got. No each other and work together, and kinda, formerly Egypt. So both of you guys have special interests in lower shrimp, the injuries Elliott working with pediatric and adolescent, sportsmed. Eric doing the same with some college athletes, and being a practicing as well. How did you guys decide to get together and do some research, and then we’ll get into what it was and where the audience can find it. Burqa started on the research paths together while we were together at shop. We did come out with a more retrospective analysis looking at the pediatric strengthen front-row, turn in the pediatric athlete, and then it kind of bird into a little more while, and I remember very closely when Elliott our standing next to each other at CSM, how long it was it remember that in California, I think, when whenever the Anaheim yeah, yeah.

05:15 – 10:04

Book that we has had this idea like, you know, we’re coming out with all these recognitions, but we really don’t know what it is that peaky are actually doing out there in terms of whites, specifically, a C L rehab returned to play return to sport return to life. Yeah. So when we were working together at shop, we do a lot of these functional and strength testing on patients that we weren’t really seeing. And when we were talking to them while they while they were coming in. You were getting again, gambit whole gambit as far as what they were doing regarding every in along with what kind of critique. Syrian that they’re, they’re practicing teachers were using this got us to thinking about, you know, yes, there are recommendations and guidelines out there, but is there that much variability out there in nickel practice? Gotcha. So you’re seeing what all the research was, and that’s what you’re doing at CSM, but you’re saying what’s actually being done, what where’s, where’s the translation? What’s the hand off from research and best practices to what’s actually being done with athletes? Yeah, I think yeah. And I think it also kind of reverse too, because we had that kinda unique experience at shop. Where are surging kind of require their patients to come the are there teams are to make sure they are functional testing program, where they the L part of that is, it’s great because we get interacted patient that we’re not treating on a day-to-day basis, we’re seeing at three months post op or six months and saying, all right. Tell me what you’re doing. And we hear from the patient’s perspective, are they are they following of, like, what we would consider to be best practice guidelines what have they done? Maybe prior to come. In and the patient, assessing aunts. And then, and then we give to CSM we hear what all this really great research is saying, man, we should be doing. We should be doing more. We shouldn’t do, and it’s like, but, you know, the, the patients that we have coming in from outside, our walls, or maybe not even doing happened that too. So it’s like, you know, it really spurred that idea what, what happened was the general practitioner that seeing, you know, maybe mostly maybe low back pain, or older patients when they get kind of SEAL that walkner door, you know, that they may not be a specialist in these the what is what does that person doing to make decisions about returns person, the play I like how it was formulated, organically, guys standing there together at, at CSM and saying, hey, what about this? Why don’t we take a look at the cool part was you guys went and follow through, and you wind up doing it. So, so talk about what happened next after that moment, when you actually follow through, we kind of formulated the idea, and we brought together, what we’ve dealt with a really good team, people with orthopedic surgeons that we work with here at job, and in PT’s, and we kinda got the, the survey. Of what we wanted to the question that we wanted to ask formulated together. And then we thought, hey, great idea, not only look at what therapists are doing. But on the other side, we look at the PD surgeon, they’re doing as well. So he came up with this idea of maybe the three sixty degrees, scope of people that are involved in, in these rehab decision, seeing what if kind of the Philip how to be in the orthopedic surgeons are kind of the overall directors, they’re the ones that are delivering the protocols for their patients. And, you know, saying this is what should be done. You know, we should see what they think about package patterns TT’s, or the one we’re in the trenches were the ones that actually were applying testing. But we feel should be best. You know what is what the P T say we wanted to kind of see what are both sides would say. And then maybe the compare contrast and draw conclusions from that. Unlike the more like a time line and being able to see again, what’s, what’s best practice. That’s great. But what’s actually being done on both ends in terms of the orthopedic surgeons and then the follow through with the, the physical therapists after? The surgery. So, so how’d you guys approach it and, and what you guys fine. Let’s get into the nitty gritty yet for one of the biggest things that we found was that there was a large variability, not physical therapist, but also with the orthopedic surgeon, and I think it really probably under floors, or underestimates, the ability out there, because the sample that we took from was the sports section with exception in private practice section, or what formerly known as those sections, I should say with their new name changes. But it’s a pretty, if you think about it a homogeneous sample of people, you would think that would be in the know of the current landscape of the literature, who would probably under floors, or under made the, the true, very villi out there similarly that we, we found even more variety in the orthopedic population, certain population, and that was the sample of pediatric orthopedic surgeon from the research and sports medicine group prison. Group, once again, a very homogeneous sample that tends to be a little bit more up to date with their with their current recommendation. So we, we were, we were quite quick deprived prize, the degree of Billy that we found, so, so I just want to stop you there to make sure I understand what you’re saying, and make sure the audience gets it too.

10:04 – 15:09

So you’re saying this groups free homogeneous you figured it, would they be more well informed because these are the people who go out of their way to not only be members but to be section or academy members and seek out the research, so they should have been sticking to or at least be closer to the best practice guidelines that have been put forth so far. But you saw variability, which you’re saying really really, really highlights how much variability was out there that you couldn’t even reach at xactly yet. Okay. I just didn’t wanna make sure I, I want to make sure I understood that. So it’s okay that is that is pretty telling what were some of the results you want to get into some of the some of the highlights. And some of the things that you guys found that maybe surprise you or didn’t surprise you. If you think about the decision. Making profits or what you’re the tools. You’re using from, from time based parameters to some type of strength criteria to some type of stumps performance measure to maybe some type of patient outcome measure or psychological attachment or contract dry. I mean, the variation existed across all of those, but even some of the more kind of would you consider maybe more concrete things like time we’re not even agreeing on time when the progress patience right now and you think that there’s probably the better most amount of research looking to support like those simple those, those type of concrete things. But we can’t even agree. And then when you start drilling down into the details about well, are reassessing strength and a lot of everybody agreed like. Yeah. Strength is important. But then we asked, how are you assessing strength that then variability just started from there? Right. And some people there was a large proportion of the sample PT’s that, you know, just relied on manual muscle testing to progress their patients and kind of what the literature showing is that, you know, we’re not going to be able to. Identify these higher levels of gases. Pete that may exist for these patients, when they’re strong but they’re just not strong enough using now montage, tonight’s lesion. But then when people are using either more objective measures, like handle their no mama tree. Or there’s availability rice the testing the standard that which they’re holding them to the variability just continues to progress where some people required seventy five percent. Maybe limbs imaging index and some people were maybe above one hundred percent. It’s there’s just, you know, the organizer surprised they as we drill down. You know, the win the details of what we’re doing and everyday practice, we can agree on broad strokes. We can agree that strengthening important, the man when you start like measuring strength like how you’re actually applying and doing that. That’s really different from everybody. Do you see in the framework is there? But how you actually apply and actually measure things like time or strength, which everyone pretty much agrees on being important factors to take into consideration when you start. Looking even smaller there. That’s where you see even more the very variability come into play. Yeah. Yeah. Eric, what do you want more like the devil? That was in the house a little bit like he talked to finishing tonight and nobody’s gonna argue that strength that meet strength. This is not going to be important. But I think once you start to, to hammer down on to power, they testing or something the strength of, of, of their patients. Are you really comparing apples to apples when when you start to go across different clinics, clinician and patients? And I think it really does create a little bit confusion, not just in the PT population in the clinic population. But Auckland patients to talk with one another, when they’re like, oh, yeah. I think cleared how they took your or yeah, they, they hooked me up to this machine four times. And, and I have to get at least ninety cent and the other person’s like oh, I’ve never done that before. And they’re back on the field plan already. I think it really does create a little bit of confusion within the society as well as are we really treating the same patients across different clinicians in clinic. And practitioners in the same profession. You know, right. That’s and that’s a great example of when you get to patients together, and they say, oh, we have the same injury, we must have done the same type of rehab, or at least hit these big big benchmarks. And when they’re different that’s confusing. And again, I get it, you know, patients are different from patient to patient. But if this is what best practices are, how come there’s so much variability? What were you able to hone in and either measure and ask, or at least if not speculate? Why is it? Why, why do we take it upon ourselves to, to have so much variability within the PT arm of the survey that we thought he’d be able to get one of those details? We, we tried to look at commision doctor that maybe influenced some of their him their decision that the us. So we had we kind of broke people down into, like either, high volume or low volume practitioners, where we said, anybody that treated more than ten miles per year. We accounted for them at high volume. Actitities and those less than that were low volume. We looked at certified specialists versus not certified specialists. And we don’t think years of clinical experience, and you know, if we if we use, we don’t know what that program is or, you know, like like you said, a few times we have our current, you know, Beth standard that we have our practice standard.

15:09 – 20:08

But we know if those are ideal hopefully change as we continue to learn more. But if we lived up to characteristics of the clinicians relative to the decision, they were making it seem like certified specialists were more likely to follow either which beat, of course, board certified specialists more likely to follow those kind of current practice guideline, and also those clinicians that were that were into our high volume clinicians seem to kind of follow more those best practice standards. So jor Beth is kind of what we’ve only result is that meeting. Those conditions are maybe more tied into the current literature or maybe by into the current literature more maybe see the investment in their practice going out. Of the way there, that’s a self selected group, which we started talking about the top of the show. These are people who say when your SAS, or when you’re seeing high volume, I’m I better, I better be doing the best because I’m practices wise because I’m seeing so many of these types of patients, these specific type of patients each and every year variability in terms of testing, I could imagine sometimes would have to do with ability of Quebec. Right. Each practice setting is going to be different. Yeah, definitely. And I think Becky him about a up in some of our speculation that people that had can be high volume a, you know, probably see the investment in an economic Donna, Mamata, or even like a handheld on a monitor roof with someone who may maybe in a facility where they’re not being as many of those types of patients may not be willing to invest in something because there’s no cost benefit for them or return on their investment in the long term. And obviously, there are other financial issues that you come across. Basis issues potentially. So I think there’s a lot of confounding issues that could arrive that can reason why someone is not using this type of instrumentation where can work in the audience, find this and, and download and kind of consumer themselves want to make sure they get access to it. Yes. The PTA survey published in jail at BT in October issue. Twenty eighteen and me surge in order big surgeon arm of the study was just published last month on in the orthopedic journalist sports medicine, Zingo them, and you can download that, that’s a full tech there, you can download full text there. No problem. What, what was the what was some of the attitudes of people who participated in this after the, the results will reveal work were they shocked were they surprised to were they, you know, pledging to, to change their practice because they saw such variability or anything come out of that, you know, I don’t think it was that surprising. I think I think disturbing survey kinda showed what everybody coming, Verdy thought. Victor knew existed that there’s variation out there and everyone’s like, wow, I, I knew it was variable. But I didn’t think it was very -able. You know what I think that was kind of, like just reinforced them the some of the thoughts, we did get a couple of emails from people like saying, hey, this is this is really nice really enjoyed remiss kinda good study, but I don’t know air and different Binyamin that no you know what it was interesting. I think you’ve gotta lar- a lot of publicity on social media platforms almost like the like a shock value of you need to do better. You know, by no means do I think you are. Is it is it bulletproof is it the best thing out there? Is it catching all people who may be at risk? But, but at least it’s the best we have at this point. But it seems if people aren’t even doing that at this point. So how could we really say that it’s not doing what it claims to be doing? If people aren’t there aren’t really doing it. So I think it, it really gained some headway on, on the media platform of saying, hey guys, let’s do a little bit better out there. I like that good. Take a quick break want to thank our sponsors are east medical staffing for keeping the show on the air. They find jobs, whether you’re gonna do so Adelphia or Long Island or anywhere you want to do a beach a lake. He wanna go mountains. He want to ski you can do that. That’s the cool part of variability in our in our profession is people need PT all over. So go do what you want where you want to do it. And Arias get you set up a U, R, E US, medical dot com. Not only just having the positions. But as well as being with a walkie through all the pain points. What do I do if I’m licensed in New York? But I want to go work in California for a couple of months they’ve got people on board to help you walk you through that. So you’re not on your own housing. How do you find where to live and is the person that use hiring you? They pay for that. They’ve got someone to walk you through that as well. The thing that could knit freaked me out the most was taxes. If you live in New York, but you’re temporarily working in Colorado. What do you do again? Arias has someone for that as well. So check them out, if you want to do a short term placement or look into relocate long-term, a U, R, E US medical dot com. Where, where would you guys go if you could go anywhere in the fifty states, if you do exactly what you wanna do what state, haven’t you been to that? You would give shot for thirteen weeks.

20:09 – 25:05

What bait haven’t I been to? Well, I was thinking more of that. I have been to Florida gator, we go down to Pensacola Beach, Florida every odd year for a week, and that is one of my favorite places in the United States. But opera played the haven’t been to having not ally. They had not been there, I would probably pick some somewhere in the mountain bikers aggo could Pacific northwest. Well at school party where the fifty states check him out. You are US medical dot com. Extent stay tuned. The we’ll be right back to the P T on cast. If you look at for education passed your physical therapy degree, look no further than Brooks. H L, Brooks rehabilitation institute of higher learning you could find out more Brooks, I h l dot org continuing education along with residencies and fellowships residencies in Orthopaedics, geriatrics, women’s health, neurologic PT, pediatrics, sports, and fellowship opportunity as well. So look into it if you’re looking to expand your knowledge base Brooks, IHL dot org to the typecast with Jimmy MacKay question. How was the how are the views or how was the reaction you guys mentioned, some kind of shock value on on social media saying, hey, come almost a rallying cry. But we, we need to do better. Let’s do better. Was there any reaction from the orthopedic surgeons since they’re the kind of the first touch point in the patient, and then they pass them off to us betcha they expect us to be doing best practices? What was their reaction to the results? I haven’t seen much reaction to the there’s a lot more talk about it and probably considerable Eric. And I of fly in within the realm when we did present it that at conference. We got a lot of really good feedback. We actually won best paper award at the prison conference the year, we did present this at that conference. I think there was there was a lot of kind of good Baillieu in, in the in the paper and the topics. And you know, we’re hoping that maybe it’s going to help drive Johnston change where beating side and change things around to so, so, so alternately. I guess the question to ask, is how do we do better? You know, we have these academies, now we specialize, we have best practices is there anything that you would that you, if you could make may wave. Magic wand that you put into play. How can we do better? I did a residency at the. I did a residency at the at the university of Delaware did for threatens there under the guidance of insider macadear who’s been acute advocate for the tests. You know, you need to test the folk and there’s been research out there that said, don’t, don’t need an kind of garner monitor to assess quad strikes you all you need is in the extension, machine that every clinic was throwing out a few years back and now the starting to get them out of the trash. So I think it comes down to, you know what take the time out. It’s worth your while for the information that you get just to do repetition, maximum testing if that’s all you have is you have a handheld item ometer, you use both types of testing, but I think it’s taking the time out and maybe sacrificing other parts of your of your treatment to really get the data that you need to make educated decisions. And that’s a valuable thing, right? Giving up some time. But if if, if what you’re presenting his is correct, which we, we would assume that would be since its best practices that time is well, spent, we’ll we’re going to say sorry to cut you off yet. I agree. I think engage in this conversation is actually helpful in getting some of the some of that social media. No on your your, your show. You’ve talked about kind of lag time between evidence to trickle down everyday practice. And I think that the social media conversations really helpful with and they can push us that people probably wouldn’t have picked up the paper or read it beforehand. And there’s there’s so much stuff about about ACL coming out. I mean I mean hundreds of papers every year to try and I get that. But I think trying to just these maybe maybe helped reinforce some of this, you know, the current standard that we think are the best to try to help, you know, get that out to general practitioners that don’t specialize an easy else, but probably Seeven majority of easy L patients because they make up the majority of the general practices that are out there, and maybe helping to adopt you know, the doctor and the guidelines that are that are being put forward. We’ll look at Alex, look the positive at least there are best practices, right? And we’re pushing we’re pushing up professor. Towards finding out what is best that’s great. That’s a great problem to have is. How do we know? How are we going to disseminate that and make sure it gets put into play? At least we got that first part least, we’re really, really paying attention to the first part. Now, if we as you just mentioned, continue to have those conversations, maybe hopefully it’ll help that second part with this emanation last thing. I wanted to ask Eric, you’ve got a unique situation in terms of, of working with students any strategies to encourage students and new clinicians to adopting best practices, and making the change in current practice patterns, to hopefully as they progress in their careers continue that and then teach other students to change the profession.

25:05 – 30:18

Yeah. You know, I had as a an instructor in professor at this point, I tend to utilize a lot of media and podcasts, some of your own actually and other types of logs and things like that after screen through them with my Hyun because I feel like it’s very powerful to hear it from the door at both. So more. Digestible for them than reading the text books. Hearing me talk about it up there. So I utilize that empowers them to get engaged in conversation with the people who are actually putting out literature, and the people who do have experience aside from hearing it from myself as a sage on the stage. I also my mantra to the students are you know they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that, that, that catalyst in the clinic, don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with he that change. Bring the new culture two who’ve been out there who, who may not know what, what is new in the research realm. So I, I really encountered them to be that catalyst that change of the profession, taking it from out of the academic side of things into clinical practice love it. Be the change. Right. It’s not gonna change unless you take what you exactly what it is take what you learn in school, and your clinical rotations and actually, start to do it love that last. Part of the show is the parting shot. It is the parting shot. The Portland shot is brought to you by rock tape more than just the tape company. Rock tape is a movement company, tools and education for medical professionals, if you look at it help, your patients, go stronger longer. Checkout rock tape dot com. You guys have an opportunity to leave one one sentiment with the audience before you go who wants to go first with their partying shop Erica, you kick it off that. All right. So, I guess my parting dot would probably be addictive. Festive, we could do with younger. Patients is its neck with them understand that they’re not an eight the pair, their person who had an affair, and in dealing with kids and dealing with adults. You know you need to manage each person’s differently by using the evidence as your guide, but understanding that you need to tell about intimate independence to the person. And if you could just connect with that person, you’re, you’re, you’re gonna make that person better, regardless of, of. What you do as long as you’re you’re, you’re letting Evan guide you love at Elliot. You’re up and parting shot when he got I think just making sure you continue to grow as a clinician, you know, I think seeing a lot of as the ovation in unfortunately thing, a lot of them hail or have re injury or or secondary injury has has driven me to want to get better. You know. And I think just kind of continuing to grow as condition, and, and, and use those, those events or in that let learning to, to better yourself for the next person around is, is an important thing love that before we go. I’m just you. You’re prescribing podcast episodes, as homework or is outside learning to students love to hear that. I am. I and actually I get made fun of by my other faculty members because of it. But obviously, I listen to a lot of them my forehand. I don’t just give it to them, but I feel like it’s a lot more digestible for them. They can do it while they’re driving into school. They could do it while they’re working out. So. They can work it into their, their everyday life. And it also brings them. They stumble upon other things within that podcast. And it’s more student directed learning after that because they’re like, oh, I listen to this on certain podcast. And then I saw another episode that I was in it really interests me. So it starts to get them on that self directed learning which which is so important for when they do graduate is, how do they, you know, now the information coming to them, they have to go out and seek it? So it teaches them that new skill. You know, selfishly a love to hear that because I host a couple of different podcasts. But I like it because as the as the guy with a degree in communications you’re talking or you’re trying to facilitate a conversation, the way your audience listens. And you’re listening the way your audience talks, and that’s a way to facilitate great conversation instead of what you mentioned earlier being the sage on the stage. That’s a presentation. Right. Some people do learn really well from presentation myself, I’m a conversation guy, obviously. So, you know, selfishly hey, love love to hear that. You’re prescribing assigning podcast episodes, maybe one or two for my show to students, but just love the fact that you’re open to and Anna do want to highlight you mentioned it twice that you do screen through that. Anybody with a microphone create a podcast super easy. But I love the fact that you’re screening it and highlighting. Hey, pay attention to this, and they do after that, if they trip across an episode that hasn’t been screened they need to take that upon themselves because there’s a lot of information in less than great information out there to. Absolutely. I think that’s the most important thing. Is that you’re, you’re, you’re really screening through it to make sure because there’s a lot of stuff out there, that, that maybe you doesn’t really job with the intentions of, of what you want them to get to learn and last point, I’ll make love that too, because once they graduate, they don’t have a professor down the hall or they aren’t running into someone each and every week.

30:19 – 32:32

We’re having that information brought to them, they need to start to seek it out. And think, you know, handing over day of a blog to read or. Podcast, listen to or video channel follow. That’s a great digestible way as we mentioned before, of getting information. Once you start working forty hours a week when you graduate gentlemen, want to say thanks very much for your time. Don’t think it will be the last one. We have you guys on the show, but etc. Service episode with everybody. On the P T cast is a product of p t pint cast LLC it is hosted and produced by p t podcasts. EEO Jim McKay, and CBO sky, Donovan from Marymount university, we talk PT, drink, beer, and record it this has been another poor from the PT pint cast the PD podcasts in ten for educational purposes. Only no clinical decision making should be based solely on one source while Perez, taken to ensure accuracy, factual errors can be present. More on the show at PT podcasts dot com. We’re home on the internet t-, pine cast dot com created by build PT. Build PT provides marketing services, specifically for private practice, PT’s website, development and hosted inviting content marketing solutions PT clinics across the country. See with good PT can do for you. Today dot com. The PT pint cast proudly supports the Travis mills foundation on April tenth twenty twelve United States army staff sergeant Travis mills of the eighty second airborne was critically injured on his third tour of duty in Afghanistan by while on patrol losing portions of both legs, and both arms. He is one of only five quadruple amputees from the wars in Iraq, and Afghanistan to survive his injuries, thanks to his amazing strength, courage, and incredible will to live the heroic actions of the men in his unit. The prayers of thousands and all the healthcare providers at the Walter Reed Army medical center. Travis remains on the road to recovery. He founded the Travis mills foundation, a nonprofit organization formed to benefit and assist. Combat injured. Teran’s. Travis lives by his motto never give up. Never quit to support the Travis mills foundation. Or to find out more visit Travis mills dot org.

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ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg We talk with Eric & Elliot Greenburg (no relation) about ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes.<br /> <br /> Topics hit:<br /> <br /> High rates of ACL injury and repeat injury among youth/adolescent athletes.<br /> <br /> Recent publications of ours that identifying variability of rehabilitation methods in determination of progression of activity following ACL reconstruction among physical therapists and orthopedic surgeons<br /> <br /> Controversy regarding what criteria "should" be used to help determine rehab progression, including return to sports among this population. Translating evidence into practice, which is not occurring according to our survey results. <br /> <br /> How can we optimize rehabilitation in a world of managed care, escalating copays and high deductible insurance plans. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 32:32
LIVE @ Elon University NCPTA! Part 1 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/04/08/live-elon-university-ncpta-part-1/ Mon, 08 Apr 2019 10:49:17 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5420 Wanna thank Brooks rehabilitation there institute of higher learning for sponsoring the show. Residency and fellowship opportunities is what they offer check them out at Brooks, IHL dot org. Also hosting their fourth annual scholarly symposium that's going on June twenty second in Jacksonville, Florida information about the symposium can be found at Brooks H, L dot org. Keynote presentation this year by the editor of p t j Allan jetty. I'll be on hand doing some talks and some live podcasting looking for C E us into expand your knowledge base. Look, no further than Brooks, IHL dot org. Was lucky enough to be invited to the North Carolina physical Therapy Association. They're like annual conference students put this programming on himself. Last year was at Duke got a chance to be there and this year at Elon university. So we'll actually break this up into a two parter since it was a little longer. Listen to a couple of interviews. Listen to our first two interviews in part one. And we'll follow it up with two hundred years in part to just a lot of excitement. Seeing a lot of students do this and putting on their own conferences that their own program doing it all themselves so excited to see the next generation of physical, therapists, taking the pawn themselves to decide what they're learning and how they're learning it and super excited to see that they're actually choosing to learn together. So a bunch of North Carolina PT programs are represented a lot of good fun. And take a listen got some great advice for some people in our profession. First round is brought to you by Owens recovery. Science a single source for looking for certification and personalized blood flow restriction rehabilitate. Training and the equipment you need to apply. Find them online at Owens recovery. Science dot com. Let's rock and roll. Here. We go. The best conversations happen at happy hour. Welcome two hours. This is the P T typecast. Here's your host, physical therapist, Jimmy MacKay. Gentlemen. We are live at Elon university in Ilan, North Carolina. Their motto here Newman, Lumine it rhymes. It means vine light their colors, maroon and gold and their mascot is the Phoenix forever. Reborn. Wanna thank North Carolina physical Therapy Association as well their students special interest group for putting on the second. Stay conclave, Jen Beatty for being the grand poobah this shindig. Thanks, jen. Yeah. So we're graduate live show, and we've got to get our guests. So let's bring our guests out right now. Our guest lives at works at Charlotte. North Carolina got his DVD. From Winston Salem university is currently working with on college patient, endurance athletes. Ladies jets, doctor clicks Fano. Well, played on the music. Clint welcome back to the stage. Man. Oh, it's great to be here. Likes your energy for the audience. Not in the room. The kind of keynote thing here. I did I energy bringing it. That's right. Yeah. I was asked to be the keynote speaker for this wonderful event and had an awesome time delivering earlier today. All right. So for people not in the room. What were the big points? Like what what's what are you? What were you passionate enough about when asked when given a stage in front of a bunch of students and physical therapist assistant students where PTA students. And just so you guys know for in the room and not in the room. The PTA doesn't stand for physical, therapists. That's the profession and you're in it. So I'm not ignoring you. Okay. But you let me down there. First second. I'm not ignoring you in. You're almost ignoring me. Roundabout long questions when you're asked. Hey, come talk to, you know, the future of the profession would you land on a why the big thing was the professional development? How do we take students from their third year of school after their affiliations? They pass the licensing exam. How do we get them? Or how do they get into the clinicals or the into the jobs?

ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg | 2 hrs ago

0:00 – 05:14

Hi, I’m Alexa. You can now hear PT podcast. Using me just say, hey Alexa, launched PT, pint cast, or you could be nice and try saying, please for lunch, what is being polite? Dead these days to your episodes, just say, hey Alexa, launch PT pint cast, maybe throw in a please. At the end my monitor the -tudents are they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that Cadillac in the clinic. Don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with e that change. Bring the new culture two out there who, who may not know what is new in the research realm. So I really in power them to be that catalyst that change of the freshen taking your from the academic side of things into clinical practice. Get a chance to talk to the greenberg’s. Eric in Elliot Greenberg. No relation. They had a couple of publications about ACL rehab and best practices. We. Best practices, but are those best practices being put into practice? So did there. So they took a look at it from an orthopedic surgeon perspective, physical therapist, perspective, and really, ultimately wanted to see why or why not those best practices were being actually utilized. So we took a talk with those two guys at the same time in this episode take a listen. I think it’s got insights beyond just ACL rehab, right? Re really insights into where’s the fall off in best practice to actual practice. So we’re going to get into that with these guys episode brought to you by Owens recovery, science, a single source for PT’s looking for certification in personalized blood flow, restriction rehabilitation training and the equipment, you need to apply in your clinical practice Zach Ephron on social media, just see. And he’s going through ACL rehab, and using har-. So that’s, that’s kind of cool to see in the mainstream, and he did a little shout to his great physical therapist athletic trainers going through rehab. So check it out, Owens recovery science dot com. If you’d like to get certified. And grab that equipment, we do want to let you know, we have another podcast that’s been launched. N. P T E, study cast, helping students study for the board exams. So check it out wherever podcast or heard. I tunes Google play Spotify. N P, T E, study cast, it is brought to you by our friends at Arias medical staffing without them. We wouldn’t be able to bring it to you. We also have free downloadable study guides for each of the episodes short to the point episodes between three and nine minutes on average about the one hundred fifty most asked about path on the N P. So check that out. N P T study cast, now available ever podcast, hurt the best conversations happen at happy hour, welcome to hours forum award. This is the P T podcasts, here’s your host, physical therapist, Jimmy MacKay the best conversations happen at happy hour. Welcome two hours your next episode of PT podcast starch right now bring it into to grow. Converge do not get confused. They are not related Elliott and Eric Greenberg. Welcome to the show guys. I’d give negative. Thanks. I have an excellent art. So we’ll start with Elliott Elliott. What’s, what’s your background, which are the audience know about you about what, what you do in your daily life daily life? I’ve kind of limit role. I work at children’s Philadelphia about three-quarters clinician, and about one quarter researcher here special interest in knee, and shoulder injuries particular ACL’s, because what I see a lot of glad heavy Elliott and Eric. What’s your superhero back story here, backdoor, the right now? I’m on Long Island and I may. In Europe, at the New York technology where I even the curriculum, it’d be program, but also treat the NYC athlete. And my current interest include working with obviously the population with lower injuries and running related injury. Excellent. So how’d you guys meet anyway? I mean I know you know Elliott, you’re, you’re at shop Philly. Eric, you’re in New York. But have you guys cross paths was was it the same conference and picked up the others name tag because you both have the same last name or what? Yeah, it’s kind of a long story, but. I we unknowingly you know, kinda sorta cross paths, a long time in our in our in our lives together. But we, we did end up. We worked together at shop for a little while. And that’s really how he really got. No each other and work together, and kinda, formerly Egypt. So both of you guys have special interests in lower shrimp, the injuries Elliott working with pediatric and adolescent, sportsmed. Eric doing the same with some college athletes, and being a practicing as well. How did you guys decide to get together and do some research, and then we’ll get into what it was and where the audience can find it. Burqa started on the research paths together while we were together at shop. We did come out with a more retrospective analysis looking at the pediatric strengthen front-row, turn in the pediatric athlete, and then it kind of bird into a little more while, and I remember very closely when Elliott our standing next to each other at CSM, how long it was it remember that in California, I think, when whenever the Anaheim yeah, yeah.

05:15 – 10:04

Book that we has had this idea like, you know, we’re coming out with all these recognitions, but we really don’t know what it is that peaky are actually doing out there in terms of whites, specifically, a C L rehab returned to play return to sport return to life. Yeah. So when we were working together at shop, we do a lot of these functional and strength testing on patients that we weren’t really seeing. And when we were talking to them while they while they were coming in. You were getting again, gambit whole gambit as far as what they were doing regarding every in along with what kind of critique. Syrian that they’re, they’re practicing teachers were using this got us to thinking about, you know, yes, there are recommendations and guidelines out there, but is there that much variability out there in nickel practice? Gotcha. So you’re seeing what all the research was, and that’s what you’re doing at CSM, but you’re saying what’s actually being done, what where’s, where’s the translation? What’s the hand off from research and best practices to what’s actually being done with athletes? Yeah, I think yeah. And I think it also kind of reverse too, because we had that kinda unique experience at shop. Where are surging kind of require their patients to come the are there teams are to make sure they are functional testing program, where they the L part of that is, it’s great because we get interacted patient that we’re not treating on a day-to-day basis, we’re seeing at three months post op or six months and saying, all right. Tell me what you’re doing. And we hear from the patient’s perspective, are they are they following of, like, what we would consider to be best practice guidelines what have they done? Maybe prior to come. In and the patient, assessing aunts. And then, and then we give to CSM we hear what all this really great research is saying, man, we should be doing. We should be doing more. We shouldn’t do, and it’s like, but, you know, the, the patients that we have coming in from outside, our walls, or maybe not even doing happened that too. So it’s like, you know, it really spurred that idea what, what happened was the general practitioner that seeing, you know, maybe mostly maybe low back pain, or older patients when they get kind of SEAL that walkner door, you know, that they may not be a specialist in these the what is what does that person doing to make decisions about returns person, the play I like how it was formulated, organically, guys standing there together at, at CSM and saying, hey, what about this? Why don’t we take a look at the cool part was you guys went and follow through, and you wind up doing it. So, so talk about what happened next after that moment, when you actually follow through, we kind of formulated the idea, and we brought together, what we’ve dealt with a really good team, people with orthopedic surgeons that we work with here at job, and in PT’s, and we kinda got the, the survey. Of what we wanted to the question that we wanted to ask formulated together. And then we thought, hey, great idea, not only look at what therapists are doing. But on the other side, we look at the PD surgeon, they’re doing as well. So he came up with this idea of maybe the three sixty degrees, scope of people that are involved in, in these rehab decision, seeing what if kind of the Philip how to be in the orthopedic surgeons are kind of the overall directors, they’re the ones that are delivering the protocols for their patients. And, you know, saying this is what should be done. You know, we should see what they think about package patterns TT’s, or the one we’re in the trenches were the ones that actually were applying testing. But we feel should be best. You know what is what the P T say we wanted to kind of see what are both sides would say. And then maybe the compare contrast and draw conclusions from that. Unlike the more like a time line and being able to see again, what’s, what’s best practice. That’s great. But what’s actually being done on both ends in terms of the orthopedic surgeons and then the follow through with the, the physical therapists after? The surgery. So, so how’d you guys approach it and, and what you guys fine. Let’s get into the nitty gritty yet for one of the biggest things that we found was that there was a large variability, not physical therapist, but also with the orthopedic surgeon, and I think it really probably under floors, or underestimates, the ability out there, because the sample that we took from was the sports section with exception in private practice section, or what formerly known as those sections, I should say with their new name changes. But it’s a pretty, if you think about it a homogeneous sample of people, you would think that would be in the know of the current landscape of the literature, who would probably under floors, or under made the, the true, very villi out there similarly that we, we found even more variety in the orthopedic population, certain population, and that was the sample of pediatric orthopedic surgeon from the research and sports medicine group prison. Group, once again, a very homogeneous sample that tends to be a little bit more up to date with their with their current recommendation. So we, we were, we were quite quick deprived prize, the degree of Billy that we found, so, so I just want to stop you there to make sure I understand what you’re saying, and make sure the audience gets it too.

10:04 – 15:09

So you’re saying this groups free homogeneous you figured it, would they be more well informed because these are the people who go out of their way to not only be members but to be section or academy members and seek out the research, so they should have been sticking to or at least be closer to the best practice guidelines that have been put forth so far. But you saw variability, which you’re saying really really, really highlights how much variability was out there that you couldn’t even reach at xactly yet. Okay. I just didn’t wanna make sure I, I want to make sure I understood that. So it’s okay that is that is pretty telling what were some of the results you want to get into some of the some of the highlights. And some of the things that you guys found that maybe surprise you or didn’t surprise you. If you think about the decision. Making profits or what you’re the tools. You’re using from, from time based parameters to some type of strength criteria to some type of stumps performance measure to maybe some type of patient outcome measure or psychological attachment or contract dry. I mean, the variation existed across all of those, but even some of the more kind of would you consider maybe more concrete things like time we’re not even agreeing on time when the progress patience right now and you think that there’s probably the better most amount of research looking to support like those simple those, those type of concrete things. But we can’t even agree. And then when you start drilling down into the details about well, are reassessing strength and a lot of everybody agreed like. Yeah. Strength is important. But then we asked, how are you assessing strength that then variability just started from there? Right. And some people there was a large proportion of the sample PT’s that, you know, just relied on manual muscle testing to progress their patients and kind of what the literature showing is that, you know, we’re not going to be able to. Identify these higher levels of gases. Pete that may exist for these patients, when they’re strong but they’re just not strong enough using now montage, tonight’s lesion. But then when people are using either more objective measures, like handle their no mama tree. Or there’s availability rice the testing the standard that which they’re holding them to the variability just continues to progress where some people required seventy five percent. Maybe limbs imaging index and some people were maybe above one hundred percent. It’s there’s just, you know, the organizer surprised they as we drill down. You know, the win the details of what we’re doing and everyday practice, we can agree on broad strokes. We can agree that strengthening important, the man when you start like measuring strength like how you’re actually applying and doing that. That’s really different from everybody. Do you see in the framework is there? But how you actually apply and actually measure things like time or strength, which everyone pretty much agrees on being important factors to take into consideration when you start. Looking even smaller there. That’s where you see even more the very variability come into play. Yeah. Yeah. Eric, what do you want more like the devil? That was in the house a little bit like he talked to finishing tonight and nobody’s gonna argue that strength that meet strength. This is not going to be important. But I think once you start to, to hammer down on to power, they testing or something the strength of, of, of their patients. Are you really comparing apples to apples when when you start to go across different clinics, clinician and patients? And I think it really does create a little bit confusion, not just in the PT population in the clinic population. But Auckland patients to talk with one another, when they’re like, oh, yeah. I think cleared how they took your or yeah, they, they hooked me up to this machine four times. And, and I have to get at least ninety cent and the other person’s like oh, I’ve never done that before. And they’re back on the field plan already. I think it really does create a little bit of confusion within the society as well as are we really treating the same patients across different clinicians in clinic. And practitioners in the same profession. You know, right. That’s and that’s a great example of when you get to patients together, and they say, oh, we have the same injury, we must have done the same type of rehab, or at least hit these big big benchmarks. And when they’re different that’s confusing. And again, I get it, you know, patients are different from patient to patient. But if this is what best practices are, how come there’s so much variability? What were you able to hone in and either measure and ask, or at least if not speculate? Why is it? Why, why do we take it upon ourselves to, to have so much variability within the PT arm of the survey that we thought he’d be able to get one of those details? We, we tried to look at commision doctor that maybe influenced some of their him their decision that the us. So we had we kind of broke people down into, like either, high volume or low volume practitioners, where we said, anybody that treated more than ten miles per year. We accounted for them at high volume. Actitities and those less than that were low volume. We looked at certified specialists versus not certified specialists. And we don’t think years of clinical experience, and you know, if we if we use, we don’t know what that program is or, you know, like like you said, a few times we have our current, you know, Beth standard that we have our practice standard.

15:09 – 20:08

But we know if those are ideal hopefully change as we continue to learn more. But if we lived up to characteristics of the clinicians relative to the decision, they were making it seem like certified specialists were more likely to follow either which beat, of course, board certified specialists more likely to follow those kind of current practice guideline, and also those clinicians that were that were into our high volume clinicians seem to kind of follow more those best practice standards. So jor Beth is kind of what we’ve only result is that meeting. Those conditions are maybe more tied into the current literature or maybe by into the current literature more maybe see the investment in their practice going out. Of the way there, that’s a self selected group, which we started talking about the top of the show. These are people who say when your SAS, or when you’re seeing high volume, I’m I better, I better be doing the best because I’m practices wise because I’m seeing so many of these types of patients, these specific type of patients each and every year variability in terms of testing, I could imagine sometimes would have to do with ability of Quebec. Right. Each practice setting is going to be different. Yeah, definitely. And I think Becky him about a up in some of our speculation that people that had can be high volume a, you know, probably see the investment in an economic Donna, Mamata, or even like a handheld on a monitor roof with someone who may maybe in a facility where they’re not being as many of those types of patients may not be willing to invest in something because there’s no cost benefit for them or return on their investment in the long term. And obviously, there are other financial issues that you come across. Basis issues potentially. So I think there’s a lot of confounding issues that could arrive that can reason why someone is not using this type of instrumentation where can work in the audience, find this and, and download and kind of consumer themselves want to make sure they get access to it. Yes. The PTA survey published in jail at BT in October issue. Twenty eighteen and me surge in order big surgeon arm of the study was just published last month on in the orthopedic journalist sports medicine, Zingo them, and you can download that, that’s a full tech there, you can download full text there. No problem. What, what was the what was some of the attitudes of people who participated in this after the, the results will reveal work were they shocked were they surprised to were they, you know, pledging to, to change their practice because they saw such variability or anything come out of that, you know, I don’t think it was that surprising. I think I think disturbing survey kinda showed what everybody coming, Verdy thought. Victor knew existed that there’s variation out there and everyone’s like, wow, I, I knew it was variable. But I didn’t think it was very -able. You know what I think that was kind of, like just reinforced them the some of the thoughts, we did get a couple of emails from people like saying, hey, this is this is really nice really enjoyed remiss kinda good study, but I don’t know air and different Binyamin that no you know what it was interesting. I think you’ve gotta lar- a lot of publicity on social media platforms almost like the like a shock value of you need to do better. You know, by no means do I think you are. Is it is it bulletproof is it the best thing out there? Is it catching all people who may be at risk? But, but at least it’s the best we have at this point. But it seems if people aren’t even doing that at this point. So how could we really say that it’s not doing what it claims to be doing? If people aren’t there aren’t really doing it. So I think it, it really gained some headway on, on the media platform of saying, hey guys, let’s do a little bit better out there. I like that good. Take a quick break want to thank our sponsors are east medical staffing for keeping the show on the air. They find jobs, whether you’re gonna do so Adelphia or Long Island or anywhere you want to do a beach a lake. He wanna go mountains. He want to ski you can do that. That’s the cool part of variability in our in our profession is people need PT all over. So go do what you want where you want to do it. And Arias get you set up a U, R, E US, medical dot com. Not only just having the positions. But as well as being with a walkie through all the pain points. What do I do if I’m licensed in New York? But I want to go work in California for a couple of months they’ve got people on board to help you walk you through that. So you’re not on your own housing. How do you find where to live and is the person that use hiring you? They pay for that. They’ve got someone to walk you through that as well. The thing that could knit freaked me out the most was taxes. If you live in New York, but you’re temporarily working in Colorado. What do you do again? Arias has someone for that as well. So check them out, if you want to do a short term placement or look into relocate long-term, a U, R, E US medical dot com. Where, where would you guys go if you could go anywhere in the fifty states, if you do exactly what you wanna do what state, haven’t you been to that? You would give shot for thirteen weeks.

20:09 – 25:05

What bait haven’t I been to? Well, I was thinking more of that. I have been to Florida gator, we go down to Pensacola Beach, Florida every odd year for a week, and that is one of my favorite places in the United States. But opera played the haven’t been to having not ally. They had not been there, I would probably pick some somewhere in the mountain bikers aggo could Pacific northwest. Well at school party where the fifty states check him out. You are US medical dot com. Extent stay tuned. The we’ll be right back to the P T on cast. If you look at for education passed your physical therapy degree, look no further than Brooks. H L, Brooks rehabilitation institute of higher learning you could find out more Brooks, I h l dot org continuing education along with residencies and fellowships residencies in Orthopaedics, geriatrics, women’s health, neurologic PT, pediatrics, sports, and fellowship opportunity as well. So look into it if you’re looking to expand your knowledge base Brooks, IHL dot org to the typecast with Jimmy MacKay question. How was the how are the views or how was the reaction you guys mentioned, some kind of shock value on on social media saying, hey, come almost a rallying cry. But we, we need to do better. Let’s do better. Was there any reaction from the orthopedic surgeons since they’re the kind of the first touch point in the patient, and then they pass them off to us betcha they expect us to be doing best practices? What was their reaction to the results? I haven’t seen much reaction to the there’s a lot more talk about it and probably considerable Eric. And I of fly in within the realm when we did present it that at conference. We got a lot of really good feedback. We actually won best paper award at the prison conference the year, we did present this at that conference. I think there was there was a lot of kind of good Baillieu in, in the in the paper and the topics. And you know, we’re hoping that maybe it’s going to help drive Johnston change where beating side and change things around to so, so, so alternately. I guess the question to ask, is how do we do better? You know, we have these academies, now we specialize, we have best practices is there anything that you would that you, if you could make may wave. Magic wand that you put into play. How can we do better? I did a residency at the. I did a residency at the at the university of Delaware did for threatens there under the guidance of insider macadear who’s been acute advocate for the tests. You know, you need to test the folk and there’s been research out there that said, don’t, don’t need an kind of garner monitor to assess quad strikes you all you need is in the extension, machine that every clinic was throwing out a few years back and now the starting to get them out of the trash. So I think it comes down to, you know what take the time out. It’s worth your while for the information that you get just to do repetition, maximum testing if that’s all you have is you have a handheld item ometer, you use both types of testing, but I think it’s taking the time out and maybe sacrificing other parts of your of your treatment to really get the data that you need to make educated decisions. And that’s a valuable thing, right? Giving up some time. But if if, if what you’re presenting his is correct, which we, we would assume that would be since its best practices that time is well, spent, we’ll we’re going to say sorry to cut you off yet. I agree. I think engage in this conversation is actually helpful in getting some of the some of that social media. No on your your, your show. You’ve talked about kind of lag time between evidence to trickle down everyday practice. And I think that the social media conversations really helpful with and they can push us that people probably wouldn’t have picked up the paper or read it beforehand. And there’s there’s so much stuff about about ACL coming out. I mean I mean hundreds of papers every year to try and I get that. But I think trying to just these maybe maybe helped reinforce some of this, you know, the current standard that we think are the best to try to help, you know, get that out to general practitioners that don’t specialize an easy else, but probably Seeven majority of easy L patients because they make up the majority of the general practices that are out there, and maybe helping to adopt you know, the doctor and the guidelines that are that are being put forward. We’ll look at Alex, look the positive at least there are best practices, right? And we’re pushing we’re pushing up professor. Towards finding out what is best that’s great. That’s a great problem to have is. How do we know? How are we going to disseminate that and make sure it gets put into play? At least we got that first part least, we’re really, really paying attention to the first part. Now, if we as you just mentioned, continue to have those conversations, maybe hopefully it’ll help that second part with this emanation last thing. I wanted to ask Eric, you’ve got a unique situation in terms of, of working with students any strategies to encourage students and new clinicians to adopting best practices, and making the change in current practice patterns, to hopefully as they progress in their careers continue that and then teach other students to change the profession.

25:05 – 30:18

Yeah. You know, I had as a an instructor in professor at this point, I tend to utilize a lot of media and podcasts, some of your own actually and other types of logs and things like that after screen through them with my Hyun because I feel like it’s very powerful to hear it from the door at both. So more. Digestible for them than reading the text books. Hearing me talk about it up there. So I utilize that empowers them to get engaged in conversation with the people who are actually putting out literature, and the people who do have experience aside from hearing it from myself as a sage on the stage. I also my mantra to the students are you know they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that, that, that catalyst in the clinic, don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with he that change. Bring the new culture two who’ve been out there who, who may not know what, what is new in the research realm. So I, I really encountered them to be that catalyst that change of the profession, taking it from out of the academic side of things into clinical practice love it. Be the change. Right. It’s not gonna change unless you take what you exactly what it is take what you learn in school, and your clinical rotations and actually, start to do it love that last. Part of the show is the parting shot. It is the parting shot. The Portland shot is brought to you by rock tape more than just the tape company. Rock tape is a movement company, tools and education for medical professionals, if you look at it help, your patients, go stronger longer. Checkout rock tape dot com. You guys have an opportunity to leave one one sentiment with the audience before you go who wants to go first with their partying shop Erica, you kick it off that. All right. So, I guess my parting dot would probably be addictive. Festive, we could do with younger. Patients is its neck with them understand that they’re not an eight the pair, their person who had an affair, and in dealing with kids and dealing with adults. You know you need to manage each person’s differently by using the evidence as your guide, but understanding that you need to tell about intimate independence to the person. And if you could just connect with that person, you’re, you’re, you’re gonna make that person better, regardless of, of. What you do as long as you’re you’re, you’re letting Evan guide you love at Elliot. You’re up and parting shot when he got I think just making sure you continue to grow as a clinician, you know, I think seeing a lot of as the ovation in unfortunately thing, a lot of them hail or have re injury or or secondary injury has has driven me to want to get better. You know. And I think just kind of continuing to grow as condition, and, and, and use those, those events or in that let learning to, to better yourself for the next person around is, is an important thing love that before we go. I’m just you. You’re prescribing podcast episodes, as homework or is outside learning to students love to hear that. I am. I and actually I get made fun of by my other faculty members because of it. But obviously, I listen to a lot of them my forehand. I don’t just give it to them, but I feel like it’s a lot more digestible for them. They can do it while they’re driving into school. They could do it while they’re working out. So. They can work it into their, their everyday life. And it also brings them. They stumble upon other things within that podcast. And it’s more student directed learning after that because they’re like, oh, I listen to this on certain podcast. And then I saw another episode that I was in it really interests me. So it starts to get them on that self directed learning which which is so important for when they do graduate is, how do they, you know, now the information coming to them, they have to go out and seek it? So it teaches them that new skill. You know, selfishly a love to hear that because I host a couple of different podcasts. But I like it because as the as the guy with a degree in communications you’re talking or you’re trying to facilitate a conversation, the way your audience listens. And you’re listening the way your audience talks, and that’s a way to facilitate great conversation instead of what you mentioned earlier being the sage on the stage. That’s a presentation. Right. Some people do learn really well from presentation myself, I’m a conversation guy, obviously. So, you know, selfishly hey, love love to hear that. You’re prescribing assigning podcast episodes, maybe one or two for my show to students, but just love the fact that you’re open to and Anna do want to highlight you mentioned it twice that you do screen through that. Anybody with a microphone create a podcast super easy. But I love the fact that you’re screening it and highlighting. Hey, pay attention to this, and they do after that, if they trip across an episode that hasn’t been screened they need to take that upon themselves because there’s a lot of information in less than great information out there to. Absolutely. I think that’s the most important thing. Is that you’re, you’re, you’re really screening through it to make sure because there’s a lot of stuff out there, that, that maybe you doesn’t really job with the intentions of, of what you want them to get to learn and last point, I’ll make love that too, because once they graduate, they don’t have a professor down the hall or they aren’t running into someone each and every week.

30:19 – 32:32

We’re having that information brought to them, they need to start to seek it out. And think, you know, handing over day of a blog to read or. Podcast, listen to or video channel follow. That’s a great digestible way as we mentioned before, of getting information. Once you start working forty hours a week when you graduate gentlemen, want to say thanks very much for your time. Don’t think it will be the last one. We have you guys on the show, but etc. Service episode with everybody. On the P T cast is a product of p t pint cast LLC it is hosted and produced by p t podcasts. EEO Jim McKay, and CBO sky, Donovan from Marymount university, we talk PT, drink, beer, and record it this has been another poor from the PT pint cast the PD podcasts in ten for educational purposes. Only no clinical decision making should be based solely on one source while Perez, taken to ensure accuracy, factual errors can be present. More on the show at PT podcasts dot com. We’re home on the internet t-, pine cast dot com created by build PT. Build PT provides marketing services, specifically for private practice, PT’s website, development and hosted inviting content marketing solutions PT clinics across the country. See with good PT can do for you. Today dot com. The PT pint cast proudly supports the Travis mills foundation on April tenth twenty twelve United States army staff sergeant Travis mills of the eighty second airborne was critically injured on his third tour of duty in Afghanistan by while on patrol losing portions of both legs, and both arms. He is one of only five quadruple amputees from the wars in Iraq, and Afghanistan to survive his injuries, thanks to his amazing strength, courage, and incredible will to live the heroic actions of the men in his unit. The prayers of thousands and all the healthcare providers at the Walter Reed Army medical center. Travis remains on the road to recovery. He founded the Travis mills foundation, a nonprofit organization formed to benefit and assist. Combat injured. Teran’s. Travis lives by his motto never give up. Never quit to support the Travis mills foundation. Or to find out more visit Travis mills dot org.

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ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg We talk with Eric & Elliot Greenburg (no relation) about ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes.<br /> <br /> Topics hit:<br /> <br /> High rates of ACL injury and repeat injury among youth/adolescent athletes.<br /> <br /> Recent publications of ours that identifying variability of rehabilitation methods in determination of progression of activity following ACL reconstruction among physical therapists and orthopedic surgeons<br /> <br /> Controversy regarding what criteria "should" be used to help determine rehab progression, including return to sports among this population. Translating evidence into practice, which is not occurring according to our survey results. <br /> <br /> How can we optimize rehabilitation in a world of managed care, escalating copays and high deductible insurance plans. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 32:32
Rehabilitation Innovations with David Putrino – Part 2 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/04/04/rehabilitation-innovations-with-david-putrino-part-2/ Thu, 04 Apr 2019 09:15:29 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5418 Rehabilitation Innovations with David Putrino - Part 2 I sat down for IPA's and …. Beer Cheese (which if you haven’t had that yet. you SHOULD) at earls beer and cheese on the UES in NYC<br /> <br /> I came across David, and what stood out was all of these COOL projects he was working on AND his weird (and i say that nicely) job title. director of rehab innovation for Mt Sinai hospital.<br /> <br /> I was PUMPED that #1 there was a position like that and #2 a PT had it!<br /> <br /> But here’s the thing, once we got to talking… we just kept finding story after story.<br /> <br /> about how research and academics really work, from a guy who navigated them, how research and tech come together, and where it falls short of the buzz feed articles that you read online.<br /> <br /> But we also talked about remarkable success he’s had & what’s coming next which you need to hear.<br /> Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 32:12 Rehabilitation Innovations with David Putrino – Part 1 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/04/04/rehabilitation-innovations-with-david-putrino-part-1/ Thu, 04 Apr 2019 09:10:25 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5416 Navigating the PT Research World with David Putrino - Part 1 I sat down for IPA's and …. Beer Cheese (which if you haven’t had that yet. you SHOULD) at earls beer and cheese on the UES in NYC<br /> <br /> I came across David, and what stood out was all of these COOL projects he was working on AND his weird (and i say that nicely) job title. director of rehab innovation for Mt Sinai hospital.<br /> <br /> I was PUMPED that #1 there was a position like that and #2 a PT had it!<br /> <br /> But here’s the thing, once we got to talking… we just kept finding story after story.<br /> <br /> about how research and academics really work, from a guy who navigated them, how research and tech come together, and where it falls short of the buzz feed articles that you read online.<br /> <br /> But we also talked about remarkable success he’s had & what’s coming next which you need to hear.<br /> Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 28:44 Effectiveness of Later Stage Exercise after TKR https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/04/01/effectiveness-of-later-stage-exercise-after-tkr/ Mon, 01 Apr 2019 10:48:08 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5412 In this episode we swap podcast feeds in order to confuse the crap out of you and see if anyone reads the show notes. Hint: Take a look at the release date. For real, listen to the episode though. More info at https://www.ptpintcast.com

ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg | 2 hrs ago

0:00 – 05:14

Hi, I’m Alexa. You can now hear PT podcast. Using me just say, hey Alexa, launched PT, pint cast, or you could be nice and try saying, please for lunch, what is being polite? Dead these days to your episodes, just say, hey Alexa, launch PT pint cast, maybe throw in a please. At the end my monitor the -tudents are they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that Cadillac in the clinic. Don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with e that change. Bring the new culture two out there who, who may not know what is new in the research realm. So I really in power them to be that catalyst that change of the freshen taking your from the academic side of things into clinical practice. Get a chance to talk to the greenberg’s. Eric in Elliot Greenberg. No relation. They had a couple of publications about ACL rehab and best practices. We. Best practices, but are those best practices being put into practice? So did there. So they took a look at it from an orthopedic surgeon perspective, physical therapist, perspective, and really, ultimately wanted to see why or why not those best practices were being actually utilized. So we took a talk with those two guys at the same time in this episode take a listen. I think it’s got insights beyond just ACL rehab, right? Re really insights into where’s the fall off in best practice to actual practice. So we’re going to get into that with these guys episode brought to you by Owens recovery, science, a single source for PT’s looking for certification in personalized blood flow, restriction rehabilitation training and the equipment, you need to apply in your clinical practice Zach Ephron on social media, just see. And he’s going through ACL rehab, and using har-. So that’s, that’s kind of cool to see in the mainstream, and he did a little shout to his great physical therapist athletic trainers going through rehab. So check it out, Owens recovery science dot com. If you’d like to get certified. And grab that equipment, we do want to let you know, we have another podcast that’s been launched. N. P T E, study cast, helping students study for the board exams. So check it out wherever podcast or heard. I tunes Google play Spotify. N P, T E, study cast, it is brought to you by our friends at Arias medical staffing without them. We wouldn’t be able to bring it to you. We also have free downloadable study guides for each of the episodes short to the point episodes between three and nine minutes on average about the one hundred fifty most asked about path on the N P. So check that out. N P T study cast, now available ever podcast, hurt the best conversations happen at happy hour, welcome to hours forum award. This is the P T podcasts, here’s your host, physical therapist, Jimmy MacKay the best conversations happen at happy hour. Welcome two hours your next episode of PT podcast starch right now bring it into to grow. Converge do not get confused. They are not related Elliott and Eric Greenberg. Welcome to the show guys. I’d give negative. Thanks. I have an excellent art. So we’ll start with Elliott Elliott. What’s, what’s your background, which are the audience know about you about what, what you do in your daily life daily life? I’ve kind of limit role. I work at children’s Philadelphia about three-quarters clinician, and about one quarter researcher here special interest in knee, and shoulder injuries particular ACL’s, because what I see a lot of glad heavy Elliott and Eric. What’s your superhero back story here, backdoor, the right now? I’m on Long Island and I may. In Europe, at the New York technology where I even the curriculum, it’d be program, but also treat the NYC athlete. And my current interest include working with obviously the population with lower injuries and running related injury. Excellent. So how’d you guys meet anyway? I mean I know you know Elliott, you’re, you’re at shop Philly. Eric, you’re in New York. But have you guys cross paths was was it the same conference and picked up the others name tag because you both have the same last name or what? Yeah, it’s kind of a long story, but. I we unknowingly you know, kinda sorta cross paths, a long time in our in our in our lives together. But we, we did end up. We worked together at shop for a little while. And that’s really how he really got. No each other and work together, and kinda, formerly Egypt. So both of you guys have special interests in lower shrimp, the injuries Elliott working with pediatric and adolescent, sportsmed. Eric doing the same with some college athletes, and being a practicing as well. How did you guys decide to get together and do some research, and then we’ll get into what it was and where the audience can find it. Burqa started on the research paths together while we were together at shop. We did come out with a more retrospective analysis looking at the pediatric strengthen front-row, turn in the pediatric athlete, and then it kind of bird into a little more while, and I remember very closely when Elliott our standing next to each other at CSM, how long it was it remember that in California, I think, when whenever the Anaheim yeah, yeah.

05:15 – 10:04

Book that we has had this idea like, you know, we’re coming out with all these recognitions, but we really don’t know what it is that peaky are actually doing out there in terms of whites, specifically, a C L rehab returned to play return to sport return to life. Yeah. So when we were working together at shop, we do a lot of these functional and strength testing on patients that we weren’t really seeing. And when we were talking to them while they while they were coming in. You were getting again, gambit whole gambit as far as what they were doing regarding every in along with what kind of critique. Syrian that they’re, they’re practicing teachers were using this got us to thinking about, you know, yes, there are recommendations and guidelines out there, but is there that much variability out there in nickel practice? Gotcha. So you’re seeing what all the research was, and that’s what you’re doing at CSM, but you’re saying what’s actually being done, what where’s, where’s the translation? What’s the hand off from research and best practices to what’s actually being done with athletes? Yeah, I think yeah. And I think it also kind of reverse too, because we had that kinda unique experience at shop. Where are surging kind of require their patients to come the are there teams are to make sure they are functional testing program, where they the L part of that is, it’s great because we get interacted patient that we’re not treating on a day-to-day basis, we’re seeing at three months post op or six months and saying, all right. Tell me what you’re doing. And we hear from the patient’s perspective, are they are they following of, like, what we would consider to be best practice guidelines what have they done? Maybe prior to come. In and the patient, assessing aunts. And then, and then we give to CSM we hear what all this really great research is saying, man, we should be doing. We should be doing more. We shouldn’t do, and it’s like, but, you know, the, the patients that we have coming in from outside, our walls, or maybe not even doing happened that too. So it’s like, you know, it really spurred that idea what, what happened was the general practitioner that seeing, you know, maybe mostly maybe low back pain, or older patients when they get kind of SEAL that walkner door, you know, that they may not be a specialist in these the what is what does that person doing to make decisions about returns person, the play I like how it was formulated, organically, guys standing there together at, at CSM and saying, hey, what about this? Why don’t we take a look at the cool part was you guys went and follow through, and you wind up doing it. So, so talk about what happened next after that moment, when you actually follow through, we kind of formulated the idea, and we brought together, what we’ve dealt with a really good team, people with orthopedic surgeons that we work with here at job, and in PT’s, and we kinda got the, the survey. Of what we wanted to the question that we wanted to ask formulated together. And then we thought, hey, great idea, not only look at what therapists are doing. But on the other side, we look at the PD surgeon, they’re doing as well. So he came up with this idea of maybe the three sixty degrees, scope of people that are involved in, in these rehab decision, seeing what if kind of the Philip how to be in the orthopedic surgeons are kind of the overall directors, they’re the ones that are delivering the protocols for their patients. And, you know, saying this is what should be done. You know, we should see what they think about package patterns TT’s, or the one we’re in the trenches were the ones that actually were applying testing. But we feel should be best. You know what is what the P T say we wanted to kind of see what are both sides would say. And then maybe the compare contrast and draw conclusions from that. Unlike the more like a time line and being able to see again, what’s, what’s best practice. That’s great. But what’s actually being done on both ends in terms of the orthopedic surgeons and then the follow through with the, the physical therapists after? The surgery. So, so how’d you guys approach it and, and what you guys fine. Let’s get into the nitty gritty yet for one of the biggest things that we found was that there was a large variability, not physical therapist, but also with the orthopedic surgeon, and I think it really probably under floors, or underestimates, the ability out there, because the sample that we took from was the sports section with exception in private practice section, or what formerly known as those sections, I should say with their new name changes. But it’s a pretty, if you think about it a homogeneous sample of people, you would think that would be in the know of the current landscape of the literature, who would probably under floors, or under made the, the true, very villi out there similarly that we, we found even more variety in the orthopedic population, certain population, and that was the sample of pediatric orthopedic surgeon from the research and sports medicine group prison. Group, once again, a very homogeneous sample that tends to be a little bit more up to date with their with their current recommendation. So we, we were, we were quite quick deprived prize, the degree of Billy that we found, so, so I just want to stop you there to make sure I understand what you’re saying, and make sure the audience gets it too.

10:04 – 15:09

So you’re saying this groups free homogeneous you figured it, would they be more well informed because these are the people who go out of their way to not only be members but to be section or academy members and seek out the research, so they should have been sticking to or at least be closer to the best practice guidelines that have been put forth so far. But you saw variability, which you’re saying really really, really highlights how much variability was out there that you couldn’t even reach at xactly yet. Okay. I just didn’t wanna make sure I, I want to make sure I understood that. So it’s okay that is that is pretty telling what were some of the results you want to get into some of the some of the highlights. And some of the things that you guys found that maybe surprise you or didn’t surprise you. If you think about the decision. Making profits or what you’re the tools. You’re using from, from time based parameters to some type of strength criteria to some type of stumps performance measure to maybe some type of patient outcome measure or psychological attachment or contract dry. I mean, the variation existed across all of those, but even some of the more kind of would you consider maybe more concrete things like time we’re not even agreeing on time when the progress patience right now and you think that there’s probably the better most amount of research looking to support like those simple those, those type of concrete things. But we can’t even agree. And then when you start drilling down into the details about well, are reassessing strength and a lot of everybody agreed like. Yeah. Strength is important. But then we asked, how are you assessing strength that then variability just started from there? Right. And some people there was a large proportion of the sample PT’s that, you know, just relied on manual muscle testing to progress their patients and kind of what the literature showing is that, you know, we’re not going to be able to. Identify these higher levels of gases. Pete that may exist for these patients, when they’re strong but they’re just not strong enough using now montage, tonight’s lesion. But then when people are using either more objective measures, like handle their no mama tree. Or there’s availability rice the testing the standard that which they’re holding them to the variability just continues to progress where some people required seventy five percent. Maybe limbs imaging index and some people were maybe above one hundred percent. It’s there’s just, you know, the organizer surprised they as we drill down. You know, the win the details of what we’re doing and everyday practice, we can agree on broad strokes. We can agree that strengthening important, the man when you start like measuring strength like how you’re actually applying and doing that. That’s really different from everybody. Do you see in the framework is there? But how you actually apply and actually measure things like time or strength, which everyone pretty much agrees on being important factors to take into consideration when you start. Looking even smaller there. That’s where you see even more the very variability come into play. Yeah. Yeah. Eric, what do you want more like the devil? That was in the house a little bit like he talked to finishing tonight and nobody’s gonna argue that strength that meet strength. This is not going to be important. But I think once you start to, to hammer down on to power, they testing or something the strength of, of, of their patients. Are you really comparing apples to apples when when you start to go across different clinics, clinician and patients? And I think it really does create a little bit confusion, not just in the PT population in the clinic population. But Auckland patients to talk with one another, when they’re like, oh, yeah. I think cleared how they took your or yeah, they, they hooked me up to this machine four times. And, and I have to get at least ninety cent and the other person’s like oh, I’ve never done that before. And they’re back on the field plan already. I think it really does create a little bit of confusion within the society as well as are we really treating the same patients across different clinicians in clinic. And practitioners in the same profession. You know, right. That’s and that’s a great example of when you get to patients together, and they say, oh, we have the same injury, we must have done the same type of rehab, or at least hit these big big benchmarks. And when they’re different that’s confusing. And again, I get it, you know, patients are different from patient to patient. But if this is what best practices are, how come there’s so much variability? What were you able to hone in and either measure and ask, or at least if not speculate? Why is it? Why, why do we take it upon ourselves to, to have so much variability within the PT arm of the survey that we thought he’d be able to get one of those details? We, we tried to look at commision doctor that maybe influenced some of their him their decision that the us. So we had we kind of broke people down into, like either, high volume or low volume practitioners, where we said, anybody that treated more than ten miles per year. We accounted for them at high volume. Actitities and those less than that were low volume. We looked at certified specialists versus not certified specialists. And we don’t think years of clinical experience, and you know, if we if we use, we don’t know what that program is or, you know, like like you said, a few times we have our current, you know, Beth standard that we have our practice standard.

15:09 – 20:08

But we know if those are ideal hopefully change as we continue to learn more. But if we lived up to characteristics of the clinicians relative to the decision, they were making it seem like certified specialists were more likely to follow either which beat, of course, board certified specialists more likely to follow those kind of current practice guideline, and also those clinicians that were that were into our high volume clinicians seem to kind of follow more those best practice standards. So jor Beth is kind of what we’ve only result is that meeting. Those conditions are maybe more tied into the current literature or maybe by into the current literature more maybe see the investment in their practice going out. Of the way there, that’s a self selected group, which we started talking about the top of the show. These are people who say when your SAS, or when you’re seeing high volume, I’m I better, I better be doing the best because I’m practices wise because I’m seeing so many of these types of patients, these specific type of patients each and every year variability in terms of testing, I could imagine sometimes would have to do with ability of Quebec. Right. Each practice setting is going to be different. Yeah, definitely. And I think Becky him about a up in some of our speculation that people that had can be high volume a, you know, probably see the investment in an economic Donna, Mamata, or even like a handheld on a monitor roof with someone who may maybe in a facility where they’re not being as many of those types of patients may not be willing to invest in something because there’s no cost benefit for them or return on their investment in the long term. And obviously, there are other financial issues that you come across. Basis issues potentially. So I think there’s a lot of confounding issues that could arrive that can reason why someone is not using this type of instrumentation where can work in the audience, find this and, and download and kind of consumer themselves want to make sure they get access to it. Yes. The PTA survey published in jail at BT in October issue. Twenty eighteen and me surge in order big surgeon arm of the study was just published last month on in the orthopedic journalist sports medicine, Zingo them, and you can download that, that’s a full tech there, you can download full text there. No problem. What, what was the what was some of the attitudes of people who participated in this after the, the results will reveal work were they shocked were they surprised to were they, you know, pledging to, to change their practice because they saw such variability or anything come out of that, you know, I don’t think it was that surprising. I think I think disturbing survey kinda showed what everybody coming, Verdy thought. Victor knew existed that there’s variation out there and everyone’s like, wow, I, I knew it was variable. But I didn’t think it was very -able. You know what I think that was kind of, like just reinforced them the some of the thoughts, we did get a couple of emails from people like saying, hey, this is this is really nice really enjoyed remiss kinda good study, but I don’t know air and different Binyamin that no you know what it was interesting. I think you’ve gotta lar- a lot of publicity on social media platforms almost like the like a shock value of you need to do better. You know, by no means do I think you are. Is it is it bulletproof is it the best thing out there? Is it catching all people who may be at risk? But, but at least it’s the best we have at this point. But it seems if people aren’t even doing that at this point. So how could we really say that it’s not doing what it claims to be doing? If people aren’t there aren’t really doing it. So I think it, it really gained some headway on, on the media platform of saying, hey guys, let’s do a little bit better out there. I like that good. Take a quick break want to thank our sponsors are east medical staffing for keeping the show on the air. They find jobs, whether you’re gonna do so Adelphia or Long Island or anywhere you want to do a beach a lake. He wanna go mountains. He want to ski you can do that. That’s the cool part of variability in our in our profession is people need PT all over. So go do what you want where you want to do it. And Arias get you set up a U, R, E US, medical dot com. Not only just having the positions. But as well as being with a walkie through all the pain points. What do I do if I’m licensed in New York? But I want to go work in California for a couple of months they’ve got people on board to help you walk you through that. So you’re not on your own housing. How do you find where to live and is the person that use hiring you? They pay for that. They’ve got someone to walk you through that as well. The thing that could knit freaked me out the most was taxes. If you live in New York, but you’re temporarily working in Colorado. What do you do again? Arias has someone for that as well. So check them out, if you want to do a short term placement or look into relocate long-term, a U, R, E US medical dot com. Where, where would you guys go if you could go anywhere in the fifty states, if you do exactly what you wanna do what state, haven’t you been to that? You would give shot for thirteen weeks.

20:09 – 25:05

What bait haven’t I been to? Well, I was thinking more of that. I have been to Florida gator, we go down to Pensacola Beach, Florida every odd year for a week, and that is one of my favorite places in the United States. But opera played the haven’t been to having not ally. They had not been there, I would probably pick some somewhere in the mountain bikers aggo could Pacific northwest. Well at school party where the fifty states check him out. You are US medical dot com. Extent stay tuned. The we’ll be right back to the P T on cast. If you look at for education passed your physical therapy degree, look no further than Brooks. H L, Brooks rehabilitation institute of higher learning you could find out more Brooks, I h l dot org continuing education along with residencies and fellowships residencies in Orthopaedics, geriatrics, women’s health, neurologic PT, pediatrics, sports, and fellowship opportunity as well. So look into it if you’re looking to expand your knowledge base Brooks, IHL dot org to the typecast with Jimmy MacKay question. How was the how are the views or how was the reaction you guys mentioned, some kind of shock value on on social media saying, hey, come almost a rallying cry. But we, we need to do better. Let’s do better. Was there any reaction from the orthopedic surgeons since they’re the kind of the first touch point in the patient, and then they pass them off to us betcha they expect us to be doing best practices? What was their reaction to the results? I haven’t seen much reaction to the there’s a lot more talk about it and probably considerable Eric. And I of fly in within the realm when we did present it that at conference. We got a lot of really good feedback. We actually won best paper award at the prison conference the year, we did present this at that conference. I think there was there was a lot of kind of good Baillieu in, in the in the paper and the topics. And you know, we’re hoping that maybe it’s going to help drive Johnston change where beating side and change things around to so, so, so alternately. I guess the question to ask, is how do we do better? You know, we have these academies, now we specialize, we have best practices is there anything that you would that you, if you could make may wave. Magic wand that you put into play. How can we do better? I did a residency at the. I did a residency at the at the university of Delaware did for threatens there under the guidance of insider macadear who’s been acute advocate for the tests. You know, you need to test the folk and there’s been research out there that said, don’t, don’t need an kind of garner monitor to assess quad strikes you all you need is in the extension, machine that every clinic was throwing out a few years back and now the starting to get them out of the trash. So I think it comes down to, you know what take the time out. It’s worth your while for the information that you get just to do repetition, maximum testing if that’s all you have is you have a handheld item ometer, you use both types of testing, but I think it’s taking the time out and maybe sacrificing other parts of your of your treatment to really get the data that you need to make educated decisions. And that’s a valuable thing, right? Giving up some time. But if if, if what you’re presenting his is correct, which we, we would assume that would be since its best practices that time is well, spent, we’ll we’re going to say sorry to cut you off yet. I agree. I think engage in this conversation is actually helpful in getting some of the some of that social media. No on your your, your show. You’ve talked about kind of lag time between evidence to trickle down everyday practice. And I think that the social media conversations really helpful with and they can push us that people probably wouldn’t have picked up the paper or read it beforehand. And there’s there’s so much stuff about about ACL coming out. I mean I mean hundreds of papers every year to try and I get that. But I think trying to just these maybe maybe helped reinforce some of this, you know, the current standard that we think are the best to try to help, you know, get that out to general practitioners that don’t specialize an easy else, but probably Seeven majority of easy L patients because they make up the majority of the general practices that are out there, and maybe helping to adopt you know, the doctor and the guidelines that are that are being put forward. We’ll look at Alex, look the positive at least there are best practices, right? And we’re pushing we’re pushing up professor. Towards finding out what is best that’s great. That’s a great problem to have is. How do we know? How are we going to disseminate that and make sure it gets put into play? At least we got that first part least, we’re really, really paying attention to the first part. Now, if we as you just mentioned, continue to have those conversations, maybe hopefully it’ll help that second part with this emanation last thing. I wanted to ask Eric, you’ve got a unique situation in terms of, of working with students any strategies to encourage students and new clinicians to adopting best practices, and making the change in current practice patterns, to hopefully as they progress in their careers continue that and then teach other students to change the profession.

25:05 – 30:18

Yeah. You know, I had as a an instructor in professor at this point, I tend to utilize a lot of media and podcasts, some of your own actually and other types of logs and things like that after screen through them with my Hyun because I feel like it’s very powerful to hear it from the door at both. So more. Digestible for them than reading the text books. Hearing me talk about it up there. So I utilize that empowers them to get engaged in conversation with the people who are actually putting out literature, and the people who do have experience aside from hearing it from myself as a sage on the stage. I also my mantra to the students are you know they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that, that, that catalyst in the clinic, don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with he that change. Bring the new culture two who’ve been out there who, who may not know what, what is new in the research realm. So I, I really encountered them to be that catalyst that change of the profession, taking it from out of the academic side of things into clinical practice love it. Be the change. Right. It’s not gonna change unless you take what you exactly what it is take what you learn in school, and your clinical rotations and actually, start to do it love that last. Part of the show is the parting shot. It is the parting shot. The Portland shot is brought to you by rock tape more than just the tape company. Rock tape is a movement company, tools and education for medical professionals, if you look at it help, your patients, go stronger longer. Checkout rock tape dot com. You guys have an opportunity to leave one one sentiment with the audience before you go who wants to go first with their partying shop Erica, you kick it off that. All right. So, I guess my parting dot would probably be addictive. Festive, we could do with younger. Patients is its neck with them understand that they’re not an eight the pair, their person who had an affair, and in dealing with kids and dealing with adults. You know you need to manage each person’s differently by using the evidence as your guide, but understanding that you need to tell about intimate independence to the person. And if you could just connect with that person, you’re, you’re, you’re gonna make that person better, regardless of, of. What you do as long as you’re you’re, you’re letting Evan guide you love at Elliot. You’re up and parting shot when he got I think just making sure you continue to grow as a clinician, you know, I think seeing a lot of as the ovation in unfortunately thing, a lot of them hail or have re injury or or secondary injury has has driven me to want to get better. You know. And I think just kind of continuing to grow as condition, and, and, and use those, those events or in that let learning to, to better yourself for the next person around is, is an important thing love that before we go. I’m just you. You’re prescribing podcast episodes, as homework or is outside learning to students love to hear that. I am. I and actually I get made fun of by my other faculty members because of it. But obviously, I listen to a lot of them my forehand. I don’t just give it to them, but I feel like it’s a lot more digestible for them. They can do it while they’re driving into school. They could do it while they’re working out. So. They can work it into their, their everyday life. And it also brings them. They stumble upon other things within that podcast. And it’s more student directed learning after that because they’re like, oh, I listen to this on certain podcast. And then I saw another episode that I was in it really interests me. So it starts to get them on that self directed learning which which is so important for when they do graduate is, how do they, you know, now the information coming to them, they have to go out and seek it? So it teaches them that new skill. You know, selfishly a love to hear that because I host a couple of different podcasts. But I like it because as the as the guy with a degree in communications you’re talking or you’re trying to facilitate a conversation, the way your audience listens. And you’re listening the way your audience talks, and that’s a way to facilitate great conversation instead of what you mentioned earlier being the sage on the stage. That’s a presentation. Right. Some people do learn really well from presentation myself, I’m a conversation guy, obviously. So, you know, selfishly hey, love love to hear that. You’re prescribing assigning podcast episodes, maybe one or two for my show to students, but just love the fact that you’re open to and Anna do want to highlight you mentioned it twice that you do screen through that. Anybody with a microphone create a podcast super easy. But I love the fact that you’re screening it and highlighting. Hey, pay attention to this, and they do after that, if they trip across an episode that hasn’t been screened they need to take that upon themselves because there’s a lot of information in less than great information out there to. Absolutely. I think that’s the most important thing. Is that you’re, you’re, you’re really screening through it to make sure because there’s a lot of stuff out there, that, that maybe you doesn’t really job with the intentions of, of what you want them to get to learn and last point, I’ll make love that too, because once they graduate, they don’t have a professor down the hall or they aren’t running into someone each and every week.

30:19 – 32:32

We’re having that information brought to them, they need to start to seek it out. And think, you know, handing over day of a blog to read or. Podcast, listen to or video channel follow. That’s a great digestible way as we mentioned before, of getting information. Once you start working forty hours a week when you graduate gentlemen, want to say thanks very much for your time. Don’t think it will be the last one. We have you guys on the show, but etc. Service episode with everybody. On the P T cast is a product of p t pint cast LLC it is hosted and produced by p t podcasts. EEO Jim McKay, and CBO sky, Donovan from Marymount university, we talk PT, drink, beer, and record it this has been another poor from the PT pint cast the PD podcasts in ten for educational purposes. Only no clinical decision making should be based solely on one source while Perez, taken to ensure accuracy, factual errors can be present. More on the show at PT podcasts dot com. We’re home on the internet t-, pine cast dot com created by build PT. Build PT provides marketing services, specifically for private practice, PT’s website, development and hosted inviting content marketing solutions PT clinics across the country. See with good PT can do for you. Today dot com. The PT pint cast proudly supports the Travis mills foundation on April tenth twenty twelve United States army staff sergeant Travis mills of the eighty second airborne was critically injured on his third tour of duty in Afghanistan by while on patrol losing portions of both legs, and both arms. He is one of only five quadruple amputees from the wars in Iraq, and Afghanistan to survive his injuries, thanks to his amazing strength, courage, and incredible will to live the heroic actions of the men in his unit. The prayers of thousands and all the healthcare providers at the Walter Reed Army medical center. Travis remains on the road to recovery. He founded the Travis mills foundation, a nonprofit organization formed to benefit and assist. Combat injured. Teran’s. Travis lives by his motto never give up. Never quit to support the Travis mills foundation. Or to find out more visit Travis mills dot org.

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ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg We talk with Eric & Elliot Greenburg (no relation) about ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes.<br /> <br /> Topics hit:<br /> <br /> High rates of ACL injury and repeat injury among youth/adolescent athletes.<br /> <br /> Recent publications of ours that identifying variability of rehabilitation methods in determination of progression of activity following ACL reconstruction among physical therapists and orthopedic surgeons<br /> <br /> Controversy regarding what criteria "should" be used to help determine rehab progression, including return to sports among this population. Translating evidence into practice, which is not occurring according to our survey results. <br /> <br /> How can we optimize rehabilitation in a world of managed care, escalating copays and high deductible insurance plans. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 32:32
What are PT students ACTUALLY thinking? LIVE from NC Student Conclave! https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/03/25/what-are-pt-students-actually-thinking-live-from-nc-student-conclave/ Mon, 25 Mar 2019 22:13:27 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5407 Transcript I want to thank the state of North Carolina for inviting us to their student conclave the nice gathering of students at Elon university this past weekend full day of conference program actually organized by the students themselves. We got to town before had ourselves a PT pub night decided to bring the microphone to the bar. And we asked students from schools all across North Carolina. The same three questions to get some insight into what students are thinking before they go on a clinical Felicien three questions were what's one thing. They're going to do to prepare for clinical affiliation. What's one thing that they're really really looking forward to and one thing that they're really scared about goal is to get some students inside about each other. And maybe some CI's out there to learn what's going on inside the head of those students before they get to clinic. The first round is brought to you by Owens recovery. Science a single source for PT looking for certification in personalized blood flow, restriction, rehabilitation training and the equipment. You need. Need to apply. Find them online at Owens recovery. Science dot com and find Johnny and his team around the world teaching this. Broadcasting physical therapists around the world is this is the PT pine cast. May I introduce you? Here's your host, physical therapist, Jimmy MacKay. Night at the North Carolina student conclave, we are in Elon North Carolina just damage free for Milan university at the PTO PubMed the night before the conclave start students rolling in right now as you can tell in the background lot of lot of pints and a lot of conversations about PT and the stuff they love and hate about PT school and one of those things that comes up doing your clinical billion. So we're gonna ask the same three questions to all the students tonight. What are you most looking forward to what are you most afraid of and how will you prepare for your clinical Viliame the goal being students will learn from each other. Maybe some CI's will learn about some insight in terms of what students are thinking before they come to them and clinic so four hundred affiliation. What's the most important thing that you'll do to prepare yourself on whatever you're about to go into like Ortho? I try to rush up on my skills. No your limits. I don't know what I don't know. I don't know what I don't know. Look it up if it's. Easy figure it out. It is not easy. Ask for your CI practice. How I wanna talk to. I think the most important thing is connecting with the patient like one on one and knowing them more than their prognosis in her diagnosis. I wouldn't know who they are. And I wanna remember that forever. Well of that people I in communication, which is close to my heart that not only shadow a person that you respect their mindset about how to treat patients, and then try to form how you're going to interact and actually set up a plan before you go is the most important thing, I do is review topics and interact with my patients so kind of being able to get permanent full tank instead of an empty tank. But we'll take it practice with some classmates and just get more comfortable comparable with being hands on you have to be a PT. If you're not in the wrong profession, I think it would be to get used to whatever patient population. That affiliation. Sees you. Gotta know the population before you get there. You're also just not knowing what you're doing and getting in there and thinking, you're CIA is gonna want you to do something that you can't do and you're gonna feel bad about it. They won't do that. I promise. No. They won't. No, not at all like looking over old notes and stuff like that, maybe reaching out to professors and things things like that. Just kind of getting a feel for how environments going look practice. My manual therapy on my classmates, so after class on the weekends. We go in hang out in the classroom, and we practice on each other different techniques...

ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg | 2 hrs ago

0:00 – 05:14

Hi, I’m Alexa. You can now hear PT podcast. Using me just say, hey Alexa, launched PT, pint cast, or you could be nice and try saying, please for lunch, what is being polite? Dead these days to your episodes, just say, hey Alexa, launch PT pint cast, maybe throw in a please. At the end my monitor the -tudents are they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that Cadillac in the clinic. Don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with e that change. Bring the new culture two out there who, who may not know what is new in the research realm. So I really in power them to be that catalyst that change of the freshen taking your from the academic side of things into clinical practice. Get a chance to talk to the greenberg’s. Eric in Elliot Greenberg. No relation. They had a couple of publications about ACL rehab and best practices. We. Best practices, but are those best practices being put into practice? So did there. So they took a look at it from an orthopedic surgeon perspective, physical therapist, perspective, and really, ultimately wanted to see why or why not those best practices were being actually utilized. So we took a talk with those two guys at the same time in this episode take a listen. I think it’s got insights beyond just ACL rehab, right? Re really insights into where’s the fall off in best practice to actual practice. So we’re going to get into that with these guys episode brought to you by Owens recovery, science, a single source for PT’s looking for certification in personalized blood flow, restriction rehabilitation training and the equipment, you need to apply in your clinical practice Zach Ephron on social media, just see. And he’s going through ACL rehab, and using har-. So that’s, that’s kind of cool to see in the mainstream, and he did a little shout to his great physical therapist athletic trainers going through rehab. So check it out, Owens recovery science dot com. If you’d like to get certified. And grab that equipment, we do want to let you know, we have another podcast that’s been launched. N. P T E, study cast, helping students study for the board exams. So check it out wherever podcast or heard. I tunes Google play Spotify. N P, T E, study cast, it is brought to you by our friends at Arias medical staffing without them. We wouldn’t be able to bring it to you. We also have free downloadable study guides for each of the episodes short to the point episodes between three and nine minutes on average about the one hundred fifty most asked about path on the N P. So check that out. N P T study cast, now available ever podcast, hurt the best conversations happen at happy hour, welcome to hours forum award. This is the P T podcasts, here’s your host, physical therapist, Jimmy MacKay the best conversations happen at happy hour. Welcome two hours your next episode of PT podcast starch right now bring it into to grow. Converge do not get confused. They are not related Elliott and Eric Greenberg. Welcome to the show guys. I’d give negative. Thanks. I have an excellent art. So we’ll start with Elliott Elliott. What’s, what’s your background, which are the audience know about you about what, what you do in your daily life daily life? I’ve kind of limit role. I work at children’s Philadelphia about three-quarters clinician, and about one quarter researcher here special interest in knee, and shoulder injuries particular ACL’s, because what I see a lot of glad heavy Elliott and Eric. What’s your superhero back story here, backdoor, the right now? I’m on Long Island and I may. In Europe, at the New York technology where I even the curriculum, it’d be program, but also treat the NYC athlete. And my current interest include working with obviously the population with lower injuries and running related injury. Excellent. So how’d you guys meet anyway? I mean I know you know Elliott, you’re, you’re at shop Philly. Eric, you’re in New York. But have you guys cross paths was was it the same conference and picked up the others name tag because you both have the same last name or what? Yeah, it’s kind of a long story, but. I we unknowingly you know, kinda sorta cross paths, a long time in our in our in our lives together. But we, we did end up. We worked together at shop for a little while. And that’s really how he really got. No each other and work together, and kinda, formerly Egypt. So both of you guys have special interests in lower shrimp, the injuries Elliott working with pediatric and adolescent, sportsmed. Eric doing the same with some college athletes, and being a practicing as well. How did you guys decide to get together and do some research, and then we’ll get into what it was and where the audience can find it. Burqa started on the research paths together while we were together at shop. We did come out with a more retrospective analysis looking at the pediatric strengthen front-row, turn in the pediatric athlete, and then it kind of bird into a little more while, and I remember very closely when Elliott our standing next to each other at CSM, how long it was it remember that in California, I think, when whenever the Anaheim yeah, yeah.

05:15 – 10:04

Book that we has had this idea like, you know, we’re coming out with all these recognitions, but we really don’t know what it is that peaky are actually doing out there in terms of whites, specifically, a C L rehab returned to play return to sport return to life. Yeah. So when we were working together at shop, we do a lot of these functional and strength testing on patients that we weren’t really seeing. And when we were talking to them while they while they were coming in. You were getting again, gambit whole gambit as far as what they were doing regarding every in along with what kind of critique. Syrian that they’re, they’re practicing teachers were using this got us to thinking about, you know, yes, there are recommendations and guidelines out there, but is there that much variability out there in nickel practice? Gotcha. So you’re seeing what all the research was, and that’s what you’re doing at CSM, but you’re saying what’s actually being done, what where’s, where’s the translation? What’s the hand off from research and best practices to what’s actually being done with athletes? Yeah, I think yeah. And I think it also kind of reverse too, because we had that kinda unique experience at shop. Where are surging kind of require their patients to come the are there teams are to make sure they are functional testing program, where they the L part of that is, it’s great because we get interacted patient that we’re not treating on a day-to-day basis, we’re seeing at three months post op or six months and saying, all right. Tell me what you’re doing. And we hear from the patient’s perspective, are they are they following of, like, what we would consider to be best practice guidelines what have they done? Maybe prior to come. In and the patient, assessing aunts. And then, and then we give to CSM we hear what all this really great research is saying, man, we should be doing. We should be doing more. We shouldn’t do, and it’s like, but, you know, the, the patients that we have coming in from outside, our walls, or maybe not even doing happened that too. So it’s like, you know, it really spurred that idea what, what happened was the general practitioner that seeing, you know, maybe mostly maybe low back pain, or older patients when they get kind of SEAL that walkner door, you know, that they may not be a specialist in these the what is what does that person doing to make decisions about returns person, the play I like how it was formulated, organically, guys standing there together at, at CSM and saying, hey, what about this? Why don’t we take a look at the cool part was you guys went and follow through, and you wind up doing it. So, so talk about what happened next after that moment, when you actually follow through, we kind of formulated the idea, and we brought together, what we’ve dealt with a really good team, people with orthopedic surgeons that we work with here at job, and in PT’s, and we kinda got the, the survey. Of what we wanted to the question that we wanted to ask formulated together. And then we thought, hey, great idea, not only look at what therapists are doing. But on the other side, we look at the PD surgeon, they’re doing as well. So he came up with this idea of maybe the three sixty degrees, scope of people that are involved in, in these rehab decision, seeing what if kind of the Philip how to be in the orthopedic surgeons are kind of the overall directors, they’re the ones that are delivering the protocols for their patients. And, you know, saying this is what should be done. You know, we should see what they think about package patterns TT’s, or the one we’re in the trenches were the ones that actually were applying testing. But we feel should be best. You know what is what the P T say we wanted to kind of see what are both sides would say. And then maybe the compare contrast and draw conclusions from that. Unlike the more like a time line and being able to see again, what’s, what’s best practice. That’s great. But what’s actually being done on both ends in terms of the orthopedic surgeons and then the follow through with the, the physical therapists after? The surgery. So, so how’d you guys approach it and, and what you guys fine. Let’s get into the nitty gritty yet for one of the biggest things that we found was that there was a large variability, not physical therapist, but also with the orthopedic surgeon, and I think it really probably under floors, or underestimates, the ability out there, because the sample that we took from was the sports section with exception in private practice section, or what formerly known as those sections, I should say with their new name changes. But it’s a pretty, if you think about it a homogeneous sample of people, you would think that would be in the know of the current landscape of the literature, who would probably under floors, or under made the, the true, very villi out there similarly that we, we found even more variety in the orthopedic population, certain population, and that was the sample of pediatric orthopedic surgeon from the research and sports medicine group prison. Group, once again, a very homogeneous sample that tends to be a little bit more up to date with their with their current recommendation. So we, we were, we were quite quick deprived prize, the degree of Billy that we found, so, so I just want to stop you there to make sure I understand what you’re saying, and make sure the audience gets it too.

10:04 – 15:09

So you’re saying this groups free homogeneous you figured it, would they be more well informed because these are the people who go out of their way to not only be members but to be section or academy members and seek out the research, so they should have been sticking to or at least be closer to the best practice guidelines that have been put forth so far. But you saw variability, which you’re saying really really, really highlights how much variability was out there that you couldn’t even reach at xactly yet. Okay. I just didn’t wanna make sure I, I want to make sure I understood that. So it’s okay that is that is pretty telling what were some of the results you want to get into some of the some of the highlights. And some of the things that you guys found that maybe surprise you or didn’t surprise you. If you think about the decision. Making profits or what you’re the tools. You’re using from, from time based parameters to some type of strength criteria to some type of stumps performance measure to maybe some type of patient outcome measure or psychological attachment or contract dry. I mean, the variation existed across all of those, but even some of the more kind of would you consider maybe more concrete things like time we’re not even agreeing on time when the progress patience right now and you think that there’s probably the better most amount of research looking to support like those simple those, those type of concrete things. But we can’t even agree. And then when you start drilling down into the details about well, are reassessing strength and a lot of everybody agreed like. Yeah. Strength is important. But then we asked, how are you assessing strength that then variability just started from there? Right. And some people there was a large proportion of the sample PT’s that, you know, just relied on manual muscle testing to progress their patients and kind of what the literature showing is that, you know, we’re not going to be able to. Identify these higher levels of gases. Pete that may exist for these patients, when they’re strong but they’re just not strong enough using now montage, tonight’s lesion. But then when people are using either more objective measures, like handle their no mama tree. Or there’s availability rice the testing the standard that which they’re holding them to the variability just continues to progress where some people required seventy five percent. Maybe limbs imaging index and some people were maybe above one hundred percent. It’s there’s just, you know, the organizer surprised they as we drill down. You know, the win the details of what we’re doing and everyday practice, we can agree on broad strokes. We can agree that strengthening important, the man when you start like measuring strength like how you’re actually applying and doing that. That’s really different from everybody. Do you see in the framework is there? But how you actually apply and actually measure things like time or strength, which everyone pretty much agrees on being important factors to take into consideration when you start. Looking even smaller there. That’s where you see even more the very variability come into play. Yeah. Yeah. Eric, what do you want more like the devil? That was in the house a little bit like he talked to finishing tonight and nobody’s gonna argue that strength that meet strength. This is not going to be important. But I think once you start to, to hammer down on to power, they testing or something the strength of, of, of their patients. Are you really comparing apples to apples when when you start to go across different clinics, clinician and patients? And I think it really does create a little bit confusion, not just in the PT population in the clinic population. But Auckland patients to talk with one another, when they’re like, oh, yeah. I think cleared how they took your or yeah, they, they hooked me up to this machine four times. And, and I have to get at least ninety cent and the other person’s like oh, I’ve never done that before. And they’re back on the field plan already. I think it really does create a little bit of confusion within the society as well as are we really treating the same patients across different clinicians in clinic. And practitioners in the same profession. You know, right. That’s and that’s a great example of when you get to patients together, and they say, oh, we have the same injury, we must have done the same type of rehab, or at least hit these big big benchmarks. And when they’re different that’s confusing. And again, I get it, you know, patients are different from patient to patient. But if this is what best practices are, how come there’s so much variability? What were you able to hone in and either measure and ask, or at least if not speculate? Why is it? Why, why do we take it upon ourselves to, to have so much variability within the PT arm of the survey that we thought he’d be able to get one of those details? We, we tried to look at commision doctor that maybe influenced some of their him their decision that the us. So we had we kind of broke people down into, like either, high volume or low volume practitioners, where we said, anybody that treated more than ten miles per year. We accounted for them at high volume. Actitities and those less than that were low volume. We looked at certified specialists versus not certified specialists. And we don’t think years of clinical experience, and you know, if we if we use, we don’t know what that program is or, you know, like like you said, a few times we have our current, you know, Beth standard that we have our practice standard.

15:09 – 20:08

But we know if those are ideal hopefully change as we continue to learn more. But if we lived up to characteristics of the clinicians relative to the decision, they were making it seem like certified specialists were more likely to follow either which beat, of course, board certified specialists more likely to follow those kind of current practice guideline, and also those clinicians that were that were into our high volume clinicians seem to kind of follow more those best practice standards. So jor Beth is kind of what we’ve only result is that meeting. Those conditions are maybe more tied into the current literature or maybe by into the current literature more maybe see the investment in their practice going out. Of the way there, that’s a self selected group, which we started talking about the top of the show. These are people who say when your SAS, or when you’re seeing high volume, I’m I better, I better be doing the best because I’m practices wise because I’m seeing so many of these types of patients, these specific type of patients each and every year variability in terms of testing, I could imagine sometimes would have to do with ability of Quebec. Right. Each practice setting is going to be different. Yeah, definitely. And I think Becky him about a up in some of our speculation that people that had can be high volume a, you know, probably see the investment in an economic Donna, Mamata, or even like a handheld on a monitor roof with someone who may maybe in a facility where they’re not being as many of those types of patients may not be willing to invest in something because there’s no cost benefit for them or return on their investment in the long term. And obviously, there are other financial issues that you come across. Basis issues potentially. So I think there’s a lot of confounding issues that could arrive that can reason why someone is not using this type of instrumentation where can work in the audience, find this and, and download and kind of consumer themselves want to make sure they get access to it. Yes. The PTA survey published in jail at BT in October issue. Twenty eighteen and me surge in order big surgeon arm of the study was just published last month on in the orthopedic journalist sports medicine, Zingo them, and you can download that, that’s a full tech there, you can download full text there. No problem. What, what was the what was some of the attitudes of people who participated in this after the, the results will reveal work were they shocked were they surprised to were they, you know, pledging to, to change their practice because they saw such variability or anything come out of that, you know, I don’t think it was that surprising. I think I think disturbing survey kinda showed what everybody coming, Verdy thought. Victor knew existed that there’s variation out there and everyone’s like, wow, I, I knew it was variable. But I didn’t think it was very -able. You know what I think that was kind of, like just reinforced them the some of the thoughts, we did get a couple of emails from people like saying, hey, this is this is really nice really enjoyed remiss kinda good study, but I don’t know air and different Binyamin that no you know what it was interesting. I think you’ve gotta lar- a lot of publicity on social media platforms almost like the like a shock value of you need to do better. You know, by no means do I think you are. Is it is it bulletproof is it the best thing out there? Is it catching all people who may be at risk? But, but at least it’s the best we have at this point. But it seems if people aren’t even doing that at this point. So how could we really say that it’s not doing what it claims to be doing? If people aren’t there aren’t really doing it. So I think it, it really gained some headway on, on the media platform of saying, hey guys, let’s do a little bit better out there. I like that good. Take a quick break want to thank our sponsors are east medical staffing for keeping the show on the air. They find jobs, whether you’re gonna do so Adelphia or Long Island or anywhere you want to do a beach a lake. He wanna go mountains. He want to ski you can do that. That’s the cool part of variability in our in our profession is people need PT all over. So go do what you want where you want to do it. And Arias get you set up a U, R, E US, medical dot com. Not only just having the positions. But as well as being with a walkie through all the pain points. What do I do if I’m licensed in New York? But I want to go work in California for a couple of months they’ve got people on board to help you walk you through that. So you’re not on your own housing. How do you find where to live and is the person that use hiring you? They pay for that. They’ve got someone to walk you through that as well. The thing that could knit freaked me out the most was taxes. If you live in New York, but you’re temporarily working in Colorado. What do you do again? Arias has someone for that as well. So check them out, if you want to do a short term placement or look into relocate long-term, a U, R, E US medical dot com. Where, where would you guys go if you could go anywhere in the fifty states, if you do exactly what you wanna do what state, haven’t you been to that? You would give shot for thirteen weeks.

20:09 – 25:05

What bait haven’t I been to? Well, I was thinking more of that. I have been to Florida gator, we go down to Pensacola Beach, Florida every odd year for a week, and that is one of my favorite places in the United States. But opera played the haven’t been to having not ally. They had not been there, I would probably pick some somewhere in the mountain bikers aggo could Pacific northwest. Well at school party where the fifty states check him out. You are US medical dot com. Extent stay tuned. The we’ll be right back to the P T on cast. If you look at for education passed your physical therapy degree, look no further than Brooks. H L, Brooks rehabilitation institute of higher learning you could find out more Brooks, I h l dot org continuing education along with residencies and fellowships residencies in Orthopaedics, geriatrics, women’s health, neurologic PT, pediatrics, sports, and fellowship opportunity as well. So look into it if you’re looking to expand your knowledge base Brooks, IHL dot org to the typecast with Jimmy MacKay question. How was the how are the views or how was the reaction you guys mentioned, some kind of shock value on on social media saying, hey, come almost a rallying cry. But we, we need to do better. Let’s do better. Was there any reaction from the orthopedic surgeons since they’re the kind of the first touch point in the patient, and then they pass them off to us betcha they expect us to be doing best practices? What was their reaction to the results? I haven’t seen much reaction to the there’s a lot more talk about it and probably considerable Eric. And I of fly in within the realm when we did present it that at conference. We got a lot of really good feedback. We actually won best paper award at the prison conference the year, we did present this at that conference. I think there was there was a lot of kind of good Baillieu in, in the in the paper and the topics. And you know, we’re hoping that maybe it’s going to help drive Johnston change where beating side and change things around to so, so, so alternately. I guess the question to ask, is how do we do better? You know, we have these academies, now we specialize, we have best practices is there anything that you would that you, if you could make may wave. Magic wand that you put into play. How can we do better? I did a residency at the. I did a residency at the at the university of Delaware did for threatens there under the guidance of insider macadear who’s been acute advocate for the tests. You know, you need to test the folk and there’s been research out there that said, don’t, don’t need an kind of garner monitor to assess quad strikes you all you need is in the extension, machine that every clinic was throwing out a few years back and now the starting to get them out of the trash. So I think it comes down to, you know what take the time out. It’s worth your while for the information that you get just to do repetition, maximum testing if that’s all you have is you have a handheld item ometer, you use both types of testing, but I think it’s taking the time out and maybe sacrificing other parts of your of your treatment to really get the data that you need to make educated decisions. And that’s a valuable thing, right? Giving up some time. But if if, if what you’re presenting his is correct, which we, we would assume that would be since its best practices that time is well, spent, we’ll we’re going to say sorry to cut you off yet. I agree. I think engage in this conversation is actually helpful in getting some of the some of that social media. No on your your, your show. You’ve talked about kind of lag time between evidence to trickle down everyday practice. And I think that the social media conversations really helpful with and they can push us that people probably wouldn’t have picked up the paper or read it beforehand. And there’s there’s so much stuff about about ACL coming out. I mean I mean hundreds of papers every year to try and I get that. But I think trying to just these maybe maybe helped reinforce some of this, you know, the current standard that we think are the best to try to help, you know, get that out to general practitioners that don’t specialize an easy else, but probably Seeven majority of easy L patients because they make up the majority of the general practices that are out there, and maybe helping to adopt you know, the doctor and the guidelines that are that are being put forward. We’ll look at Alex, look the positive at least there are best practices, right? And we’re pushing we’re pushing up professor. Towards finding out what is best that’s great. That’s a great problem to have is. How do we know? How are we going to disseminate that and make sure it gets put into play? At least we got that first part least, we’re really, really paying attention to the first part. Now, if we as you just mentioned, continue to have those conversations, maybe hopefully it’ll help that second part with this emanation last thing. I wanted to ask Eric, you’ve got a unique situation in terms of, of working with students any strategies to encourage students and new clinicians to adopting best practices, and making the change in current practice patterns, to hopefully as they progress in their careers continue that and then teach other students to change the profession.

25:05 – 30:18

Yeah. You know, I had as a an instructor in professor at this point, I tend to utilize a lot of media and podcasts, some of your own actually and other types of logs and things like that after screen through them with my Hyun because I feel like it’s very powerful to hear it from the door at both. So more. Digestible for them than reading the text books. Hearing me talk about it up there. So I utilize that empowers them to get engaged in conversation with the people who are actually putting out literature, and the people who do have experience aside from hearing it from myself as a sage on the stage. I also my mantra to the students are you know they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that, that, that catalyst in the clinic, don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with he that change. Bring the new culture two who’ve been out there who, who may not know what, what is new in the research realm. So I, I really encountered them to be that catalyst that change of the profession, taking it from out of the academic side of things into clinical practice love it. Be the change. Right. It’s not gonna change unless you take what you exactly what it is take what you learn in school, and your clinical rotations and actually, start to do it love that last. Part of the show is the parting shot. It is the parting shot. The Portland shot is brought to you by rock tape more than just the tape company. Rock tape is a movement company, tools and education for medical professionals, if you look at it help, your patients, go stronger longer. Checkout rock tape dot com. You guys have an opportunity to leave one one sentiment with the audience before you go who wants to go first with their partying shop Erica, you kick it off that. All right. So, I guess my parting dot would probably be addictive. Festive, we could do with younger. Patients is its neck with them understand that they’re not an eight the pair, their person who had an affair, and in dealing with kids and dealing with adults. You know you need to manage each person’s differently by using the evidence as your guide, but understanding that you need to tell about intimate independence to the person. And if you could just connect with that person, you’re, you’re, you’re gonna make that person better, regardless of, of. What you do as long as you’re you’re, you’re letting Evan guide you love at Elliot. You’re up and parting shot when he got I think just making sure you continue to grow as a clinician, you know, I think seeing a lot of as the ovation in unfortunately thing, a lot of them hail or have re injury or or secondary injury has has driven me to want to get better. You know. And I think just kind of continuing to grow as condition, and, and, and use those, those events or in that let learning to, to better yourself for the next person around is, is an important thing love that before we go. I’m just you. You’re prescribing podcast episodes, as homework or is outside learning to students love to hear that. I am. I and actually I get made fun of by my other faculty members because of it. But obviously, I listen to a lot of them my forehand. I don’t just give it to them, but I feel like it’s a lot more digestible for them. They can do it while they’re driving into school. They could do it while they’re working out. So. They can work it into their, their everyday life. And it also brings them. They stumble upon other things within that podcast. And it’s more student directed learning after that because they’re like, oh, I listen to this on certain podcast. And then I saw another episode that I was in it really interests me. So it starts to get them on that self directed learning which which is so important for when they do graduate is, how do they, you know, now the information coming to them, they have to go out and seek it? So it teaches them that new skill. You know, selfishly a love to hear that because I host a couple of different podcasts. But I like it because as the as the guy with a degree in communications you’re talking or you’re trying to facilitate a conversation, the way your audience listens. And you’re listening the way your audience talks, and that’s a way to facilitate great conversation instead of what you mentioned earlier being the sage on the stage. That’s a presentation. Right. Some people do learn really well from presentation myself, I’m a conversation guy, obviously. So, you know, selfishly hey, love love to hear that. You’re prescribing assigning podcast episodes, maybe one or two for my show to students, but just love the fact that you’re open to and Anna do want to highlight you mentioned it twice that you do screen through that. Anybody with a microphone create a podcast super easy. But I love the fact that you’re screening it and highlighting. Hey, pay attention to this, and they do after that, if they trip across an episode that hasn’t been screened they need to take that upon themselves because there’s a lot of information in less than great information out there to. Absolutely. I think that’s the most important thing. Is that you’re, you’re, you’re really screening through it to make sure because there’s a lot of stuff out there, that, that maybe you doesn’t really job with the intentions of, of what you want them to get to learn and last point, I’ll make love that too, because once they graduate, they don’t have a professor down the hall or they aren’t running into someone each and every week.

30:19 – 32:32

We’re having that information brought to them, they need to start to seek it out. And think, you know, handing over day of a blog to read or. Podcast, listen to or video channel follow. That’s a great digestible way as we mentioned before, of getting information. Once you start working forty hours a week when you graduate gentlemen, want to say thanks very much for your time. Don’t think it will be the last one. We have you guys on the show, but etc. Service episode with everybody. On the P T cast is a product of p t pint cast LLC it is hosted and produced by p t podcasts. EEO Jim McKay, and CBO sky, Donovan from Marymount university, we talk PT, drink, beer, and record it this has been another poor from the PT pint cast the PD podcasts in ten for educational purposes. Only no clinical decision making should be based solely on one source while Perez, taken to ensure accuracy, factual errors can be present. More on the show at PT podcasts dot com. We’re home on the internet t-, pine cast dot com created by build PT. Build PT provides marketing services, specifically for private practice, PT’s website, development and hosted inviting content marketing solutions PT clinics across the country. See with good PT can do for you. Today dot com. The PT pint cast proudly supports the Travis mills foundation on April tenth twenty twelve United States army staff sergeant Travis mills of the eighty second airborne was critically injured on his third tour of duty in Afghanistan by while on patrol losing portions of both legs, and both arms. He is one of only five quadruple amputees from the wars in Iraq, and Afghanistan to survive his injuries, thanks to his amazing strength, courage, and incredible will to live the heroic actions of the men in his unit. The prayers of thousands and all the healthcare providers at the Walter Reed Army medical center. Travis remains on the road to recovery. He founded the Travis mills foundation, a nonprofit organization formed to benefit and assist. Combat injured. Teran’s. Travis lives by his motto never give up. Never quit to support the Travis mills foundation. Or to find out more visit Travis mills dot org.

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ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg We talk with Eric & Elliot Greenburg (no relation) about ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes.<br /> <br /> Topics hit:<br /> <br /> High rates of ACL injury and repeat injury among youth/adolescent athletes.<br /> <br /> Recent publications of ours that identifying variability of rehabilitation methods in determination of progression of activity following ACL reconstruction among physical therapists and orthopedic surgeons<br /> <br /> Controversy regarding what criteria "should" be used to help determine rehab progression, including return to sports among this population. Translating evidence into practice, which is not occurring according to our survey results. <br /> <br /> How can we optimize rehabilitation in a world of managed care, escalating copays and high deductible insurance plans. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 32:32
Physical Therapist and Pro LAX Athlete Drew Simoneau https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/03/21/physical-therapist-and-pro-lax-athlete-drew-simoneau/ Thu, 21 Mar 2019 10:02:56 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5393 Transcript Hey, what's going on? We'll get some things cooking over here. Checkout pint cast dot com. A brand new store that features. Pint glasses beer coasters. And of course, laptop decals, we've got stuff like the, I heart PT stickers. Anatomically. Correct. Heart course, neuro PT, sports, PT decals. Check those out and thrown laptop and show off what you do. And how you do it at PT pint cast dot com. Look for the store this episode something different taking a look at a p t who's doing something a little bit out of the ordinary on the side drew Seminole he's a professional athlete currently playing in the professional cross leak. We get into that. What is life is like a balancing? Both of those episode is brought to you by owns recovery. Science a single source for PT's looking for certification in personalized blood flow restriction rehabilitation training and the equipment to apply it owns recovery. Science own this. Leading the field in research on BF ours. Check them out online at Owens recovery. Science dot com. Broadcasting physical therapists around the world is this is the PT pine cast. May I introduce to introduce you. Here's your host, physical therapist, Jimmy McKay. Podcast Beth conversation happened at happy hour. Welcome to our. I wanna welcome through to show. Juca? Welcome to the program. Hey, jamie. Thanks for having me. I really we were almost classmate applied to Nazareth college. We were talking just before we hit the record button. I went to undergrad in western New York, and you went to Nazareth, which anybody knows in Rochester. And I got accepted to Nazereth, and it was all set to go there. And I was psyched there's nothing against neither death loved it. I just wanted to be a little bit closer to family and friends. So I took a different route. But we were almost classmates you graduated Nazar in what seventeen can be useful in seventeen. So we were this close from Ardy known each other, drew. Mall world small missing good opportunity. But and I know Fiji. Well, yeah. All right. So let's go into your store. We had a couple of our listeners reach out and say, hey, check, this guy out they wanted to find out some more about us. So they they kind of gave me a little bit of your back story did your bachelor of science Nazereth and Rochester, along with your DP, but outside of being a physical therapist, drew. You do something a little bit uncommon, and your professional athlete talk about that a little bit. Let the audience know. Yeah. So I'm playing across and it was in fifth grade played played other sports wrestled played hockey and the whole life, and I was in high school getting ready to be recruited and doing that whole Email coaches, try to go into college and end up going to address which, you know, found out at a p t program, and that's kinda how I got involved through that room, and as I was going through school. I just kept play in my artists. And then eventually, you know, one of my teammates at the time goes once you sign up for a draft. And I never. Thought that some d three small school d three guy would you know, make it and the L and then eventually I got picked up in like a waiver wire sort of situation and a couple games into my first season. I ended up getting a start and and their amps I've been playing ever since being a little modest mean you're in the all star game as well. Yeah. Yeah. That was two years ago. That's not too shabby from going from waiver wire pickup to to get the start to, you know, make it an all star game is pretty cool. So talking about I mean familiar with the cross, but not so much major league across how does it work in terms of like, you said you went from a smaller program like Nazar? How does someone make it there is it just a tryout is scouting a little bit of both? Yeah. Livable's every team. You know? I mean, they a, you know in the realm of professional sports, major league lacrosse, and even the cross in general is a little bit of smaller niche...

ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg | 2 hrs ago

0:00 – 05:14

Hi, I’m Alexa. You can now hear PT podcast. Using me just say, hey Alexa, launched PT, pint cast, or you could be nice and try saying, please for lunch, what is being polite? Dead these days to your episodes, just say, hey Alexa, launch PT pint cast, maybe throw in a please. At the end my monitor the -tudents are they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that Cadillac in the clinic. Don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with e that change. Bring the new culture two out there who, who may not know what is new in the research realm. So I really in power them to be that catalyst that change of the freshen taking your from the academic side of things into clinical practice. Get a chance to talk to the greenberg’s. Eric in Elliot Greenberg. No relation. They had a couple of publications about ACL rehab and best practices. We. Best practices, but are those best practices being put into practice? So did there. So they took a look at it from an orthopedic surgeon perspective, physical therapist, perspective, and really, ultimately wanted to see why or why not those best practices were being actually utilized. So we took a talk with those two guys at the same time in this episode take a listen. I think it’s got insights beyond just ACL rehab, right? Re really insights into where’s the fall off in best practice to actual practice. So we’re going to get into that with these guys episode brought to you by Owens recovery, science, a single source for PT’s looking for certification in personalized blood flow, restriction rehabilitation training and the equipment, you need to apply in your clinical practice Zach Ephron on social media, just see. And he’s going through ACL rehab, and using har-. So that’s, that’s kind of cool to see in the mainstream, and he did a little shout to his great physical therapist athletic trainers going through rehab. So check it out, Owens recovery science dot com. If you’d like to get certified. And grab that equipment, we do want to let you know, we have another podcast that’s been launched. N. P T E, study cast, helping students study for the board exams. So check it out wherever podcast or heard. I tunes Google play Spotify. N P, T E, study cast, it is brought to you by our friends at Arias medical staffing without them. We wouldn’t be able to bring it to you. We also have free downloadable study guides for each of the episodes short to the point episodes between three and nine minutes on average about the one hundred fifty most asked about path on the N P. So check that out. N P T study cast, now available ever podcast, hurt the best conversations happen at happy hour, welcome to hours forum award. This is the P T podcasts, here’s your host, physical therapist, Jimmy MacKay the best conversations happen at happy hour. Welcome two hours your next episode of PT podcast starch right now bring it into to grow. Converge do not get confused. They are not related Elliott and Eric Greenberg. Welcome to the show guys. I’d give negative. Thanks. I have an excellent art. So we’ll start with Elliott Elliott. What’s, what’s your background, which are the audience know about you about what, what you do in your daily life daily life? I’ve kind of limit role. I work at children’s Philadelphia about three-quarters clinician, and about one quarter researcher here special interest in knee, and shoulder injuries particular ACL’s, because what I see a lot of glad heavy Elliott and Eric. What’s your superhero back story here, backdoor, the right now? I’m on Long Island and I may. In Europe, at the New York technology where I even the curriculum, it’d be program, but also treat the NYC athlete. And my current interest include working with obviously the population with lower injuries and running related injury. Excellent. So how’d you guys meet anyway? I mean I know you know Elliott, you’re, you’re at shop Philly. Eric, you’re in New York. But have you guys cross paths was was it the same conference and picked up the others name tag because you both have the same last name or what? Yeah, it’s kind of a long story, but. I we unknowingly you know, kinda sorta cross paths, a long time in our in our in our lives together. But we, we did end up. We worked together at shop for a little while. And that’s really how he really got. No each other and work together, and kinda, formerly Egypt. So both of you guys have special interests in lower shrimp, the injuries Elliott working with pediatric and adolescent, sportsmed. Eric doing the same with some college athletes, and being a practicing as well. How did you guys decide to get together and do some research, and then we’ll get into what it was and where the audience can find it. Burqa started on the research paths together while we were together at shop. We did come out with a more retrospective analysis looking at the pediatric strengthen front-row, turn in the pediatric athlete, and then it kind of bird into a little more while, and I remember very closely when Elliott our standing next to each other at CSM, how long it was it remember that in California, I think, when whenever the Anaheim yeah, yeah.

05:15 – 10:04

Book that we has had this idea like, you know, we’re coming out with all these recognitions, but we really don’t know what it is that peaky are actually doing out there in terms of whites, specifically, a C L rehab returned to play return to sport return to life. Yeah. So when we were working together at shop, we do a lot of these functional and strength testing on patients that we weren’t really seeing. And when we were talking to them while they while they were coming in. You were getting again, gambit whole gambit as far as what they were doing regarding every in along with what kind of critique. Syrian that they’re, they’re practicing teachers were using this got us to thinking about, you know, yes, there are recommendations and guidelines out there, but is there that much variability out there in nickel practice? Gotcha. So you’re seeing what all the research was, and that’s what you’re doing at CSM, but you’re saying what’s actually being done, what where’s, where’s the translation? What’s the hand off from research and best practices to what’s actually being done with athletes? Yeah, I think yeah. And I think it also kind of reverse too, because we had that kinda unique experience at shop. Where are surging kind of require their patients to come the are there teams are to make sure they are functional testing program, where they the L part of that is, it’s great because we get interacted patient that we’re not treating on a day-to-day basis, we’re seeing at three months post op or six months and saying, all right. Tell me what you’re doing. And we hear from the patient’s perspective, are they are they following of, like, what we would consider to be best practice guidelines what have they done? Maybe prior to come. In and the patient, assessing aunts. And then, and then we give to CSM we hear what all this really great research is saying, man, we should be doing. We should be doing more. We shouldn’t do, and it’s like, but, you know, the, the patients that we have coming in from outside, our walls, or maybe not even doing happened that too. So it’s like, you know, it really spurred that idea what, what happened was the general practitioner that seeing, you know, maybe mostly maybe low back pain, or older patients when they get kind of SEAL that walkner door, you know, that they may not be a specialist in these the what is what does that person doing to make decisions about returns person, the play I like how it was formulated, organically, guys standing there together at, at CSM and saying, hey, what about this? Why don’t we take a look at the cool part was you guys went and follow through, and you wind up doing it. So, so talk about what happened next after that moment, when you actually follow through, we kind of formulated the idea, and we brought together, what we’ve dealt with a really good team, people with orthopedic surgeons that we work with here at job, and in PT’s, and we kinda got the, the survey. Of what we wanted to the question that we wanted to ask formulated together. And then we thought, hey, great idea, not only look at what therapists are doing. But on the other side, we look at the PD surgeon, they’re doing as well. So he came up with this idea of maybe the three sixty degrees, scope of people that are involved in, in these rehab decision, seeing what if kind of the Philip how to be in the orthopedic surgeons are kind of the overall directors, they’re the ones that are delivering the protocols for their patients. And, you know, saying this is what should be done. You know, we should see what they think about package patterns TT’s, or the one we’re in the trenches were the ones that actually were applying testing. But we feel should be best. You know what is what the P T say we wanted to kind of see what are both sides would say. And then maybe the compare contrast and draw conclusions from that. Unlike the more like a time line and being able to see again, what’s, what’s best practice. That’s great. But what’s actually being done on both ends in terms of the orthopedic surgeons and then the follow through with the, the physical therapists after? The surgery. So, so how’d you guys approach it and, and what you guys fine. Let’s get into the nitty gritty yet for one of the biggest things that we found was that there was a large variability, not physical therapist, but also with the orthopedic surgeon, and I think it really probably under floors, or underestimates, the ability out there, because the sample that we took from was the sports section with exception in private practice section, or what formerly known as those sections, I should say with their new name changes. But it’s a pretty, if you think about it a homogeneous sample of people, you would think that would be in the know of the current landscape of the literature, who would probably under floors, or under made the, the true, very villi out there similarly that we, we found even more variety in the orthopedic population, certain population, and that was the sample of pediatric orthopedic surgeon from the research and sports medicine group prison. Group, once again, a very homogeneous sample that tends to be a little bit more up to date with their with their current recommendation. So we, we were, we were quite quick deprived prize, the degree of Billy that we found, so, so I just want to stop you there to make sure I understand what you’re saying, and make sure the audience gets it too.

10:04 – 15:09

So you’re saying this groups free homogeneous you figured it, would they be more well informed because these are the people who go out of their way to not only be members but to be section or academy members and seek out the research, so they should have been sticking to or at least be closer to the best practice guidelines that have been put forth so far. But you saw variability, which you’re saying really really, really highlights how much variability was out there that you couldn’t even reach at xactly yet. Okay. I just didn’t wanna make sure I, I want to make sure I understood that. So it’s okay that is that is pretty telling what were some of the results you want to get into some of the some of the highlights. And some of the things that you guys found that maybe surprise you or didn’t surprise you. If you think about the decision. Making profits or what you’re the tools. You’re using from, from time based parameters to some type of strength criteria to some type of stumps performance measure to maybe some type of patient outcome measure or psychological attachment or contract dry. I mean, the variation existed across all of those, but even some of the more kind of would you consider maybe more concrete things like time we’re not even agreeing on time when the progress patience right now and you think that there’s probably the better most amount of research looking to support like those simple those, those type of concrete things. But we can’t even agree. And then when you start drilling down into the details about well, are reassessing strength and a lot of everybody agreed like. Yeah. Strength is important. But then we asked, how are you assessing strength that then variability just started from there? Right. And some people there was a large proportion of the sample PT’s that, you know, just relied on manual muscle testing to progress their patients and kind of what the literature showing is that, you know, we’re not going to be able to. Identify these higher levels of gases. Pete that may exist for these patients, when they’re strong but they’re just not strong enough using now montage, tonight’s lesion. But then when people are using either more objective measures, like handle their no mama tree. Or there’s availability rice the testing the standard that which they’re holding them to the variability just continues to progress where some people required seventy five percent. Maybe limbs imaging index and some people were maybe above one hundred percent. It’s there’s just, you know, the organizer surprised they as we drill down. You know, the win the details of what we’re doing and everyday practice, we can agree on broad strokes. We can agree that strengthening important, the man when you start like measuring strength like how you’re actually applying and doing that. That’s really different from everybody. Do you see in the framework is there? But how you actually apply and actually measure things like time or strength, which everyone pretty much agrees on being important factors to take into consideration when you start. Looking even smaller there. That’s where you see even more the very variability come into play. Yeah. Yeah. Eric, what do you want more like the devil? That was in the house a little bit like he talked to finishing tonight and nobody’s gonna argue that strength that meet strength. This is not going to be important. But I think once you start to, to hammer down on to power, they testing or something the strength of, of, of their patients. Are you really comparing apples to apples when when you start to go across different clinics, clinician and patients? And I think it really does create a little bit confusion, not just in the PT population in the clinic population. But Auckland patients to talk with one another, when they’re like, oh, yeah. I think cleared how they took your or yeah, they, they hooked me up to this machine four times. And, and I have to get at least ninety cent and the other person’s like oh, I’ve never done that before. And they’re back on the field plan already. I think it really does create a little bit of confusion within the society as well as are we really treating the same patients across different clinicians in clinic. And practitioners in the same profession. You know, right. That’s and that’s a great example of when you get to patients together, and they say, oh, we have the same injury, we must have done the same type of rehab, or at least hit these big big benchmarks. And when they’re different that’s confusing. And again, I get it, you know, patients are different from patient to patient. But if this is what best practices are, how come there’s so much variability? What were you able to hone in and either measure and ask, or at least if not speculate? Why is it? Why, why do we take it upon ourselves to, to have so much variability within the PT arm of the survey that we thought he’d be able to get one of those details? We, we tried to look at commision doctor that maybe influenced some of their him their decision that the us. So we had we kind of broke people down into, like either, high volume or low volume practitioners, where we said, anybody that treated more than ten miles per year. We accounted for them at high volume. Actitities and those less than that were low volume. We looked at certified specialists versus not certified specialists. And we don’t think years of clinical experience, and you know, if we if we use, we don’t know what that program is or, you know, like like you said, a few times we have our current, you know, Beth standard that we have our practice standard.

15:09 – 20:08

But we know if those are ideal hopefully change as we continue to learn more. But if we lived up to characteristics of the clinicians relative to the decision, they were making it seem like certified specialists were more likely to follow either which beat, of course, board certified specialists more likely to follow those kind of current practice guideline, and also those clinicians that were that were into our high volume clinicians seem to kind of follow more those best practice standards. So jor Beth is kind of what we’ve only result is that meeting. Those conditions are maybe more tied into the current literature or maybe by into the current literature more maybe see the investment in their practice going out. Of the way there, that’s a self selected group, which we started talking about the top of the show. These are people who say when your SAS, or when you’re seeing high volume, I’m I better, I better be doing the best because I’m practices wise because I’m seeing so many of these types of patients, these specific type of patients each and every year variability in terms of testing, I could imagine sometimes would have to do with ability of Quebec. Right. Each practice setting is going to be different. Yeah, definitely. And I think Becky him about a up in some of our speculation that people that had can be high volume a, you know, probably see the investment in an economic Donna, Mamata, or even like a handheld on a monitor roof with someone who may maybe in a facility where they’re not being as many of those types of patients may not be willing to invest in something because there’s no cost benefit for them or return on their investment in the long term. And obviously, there are other financial issues that you come across. Basis issues potentially. So I think there’s a lot of confounding issues that could arrive that can reason why someone is not using this type of instrumentation where can work in the audience, find this and, and download and kind of consumer themselves want to make sure they get access to it. Yes. The PTA survey published in jail at BT in October issue. Twenty eighteen and me surge in order big surgeon arm of the study was just published last month on in the orthopedic journalist sports medicine, Zingo them, and you can download that, that’s a full tech there, you can download full text there. No problem. What, what was the what was some of the attitudes of people who participated in this after the, the results will reveal work were they shocked were they surprised to were they, you know, pledging to, to change their practice because they saw such variability or anything come out of that, you know, I don’t think it was that surprising. I think I think disturbing survey kinda showed what everybody coming, Verdy thought. Victor knew existed that there’s variation out there and everyone’s like, wow, I, I knew it was variable. But I didn’t think it was very -able. You know what I think that was kind of, like just reinforced them the some of the thoughts, we did get a couple of emails from people like saying, hey, this is this is really nice really enjoyed remiss kinda good study, but I don’t know air and different Binyamin that no you know what it was interesting. I think you’ve gotta lar- a lot of publicity on social media platforms almost like the like a shock value of you need to do better. You know, by no means do I think you are. Is it is it bulletproof is it the best thing out there? Is it catching all people who may be at risk? But, but at least it’s the best we have at this point. But it seems if people aren’t even doing that at this point. So how could we really say that it’s not doing what it claims to be doing? If people aren’t there aren’t really doing it. So I think it, it really gained some headway on, on the media platform of saying, hey guys, let’s do a little bit better out there. I like that good. Take a quick break want to thank our sponsors are east medical staffing for keeping the show on the air. They find jobs, whether you’re gonna do so Adelphia or Long Island or anywhere you want to do a beach a lake. He wanna go mountains. He want to ski you can do that. That’s the cool part of variability in our in our profession is people need PT all over. So go do what you want where you want to do it. And Arias get you set up a U, R, E US, medical dot com. Not only just having the positions. But as well as being with a walkie through all the pain points. What do I do if I’m licensed in New York? But I want to go work in California for a couple of months they’ve got people on board to help you walk you through that. So you’re not on your own housing. How do you find where to live and is the person that use hiring you? They pay for that. They’ve got someone to walk you through that as well. The thing that could knit freaked me out the most was taxes. If you live in New York, but you’re temporarily working in Colorado. What do you do again? Arias has someone for that as well. So check them out, if you want to do a short term placement or look into relocate long-term, a U, R, E US medical dot com. Where, where would you guys go if you could go anywhere in the fifty states, if you do exactly what you wanna do what state, haven’t you been to that? You would give shot for thirteen weeks.

20:09 – 25:05

What bait haven’t I been to? Well, I was thinking more of that. I have been to Florida gator, we go down to Pensacola Beach, Florida every odd year for a week, and that is one of my favorite places in the United States. But opera played the haven’t been to having not ally. They had not been there, I would probably pick some somewhere in the mountain bikers aggo could Pacific northwest. Well at school party where the fifty states check him out. You are US medical dot com. Extent stay tuned. The we’ll be right back to the P T on cast. If you look at for education passed your physical therapy degree, look no further than Brooks. H L, Brooks rehabilitation institute of higher learning you could find out more Brooks, I h l dot org continuing education along with residencies and fellowships residencies in Orthopaedics, geriatrics, women’s health, neurologic PT, pediatrics, sports, and fellowship opportunity as well. So look into it if you’re looking to expand your knowledge base Brooks, IHL dot org to the typecast with Jimmy MacKay question. How was the how are the views or how was the reaction you guys mentioned, some kind of shock value on on social media saying, hey, come almost a rallying cry. But we, we need to do better. Let’s do better. Was there any reaction from the orthopedic surgeons since they’re the kind of the first touch point in the patient, and then they pass them off to us betcha they expect us to be doing best practices? What was their reaction to the results? I haven’t seen much reaction to the there’s a lot more talk about it and probably considerable Eric. And I of fly in within the realm when we did present it that at conference. We got a lot of really good feedback. We actually won best paper award at the prison conference the year, we did present this at that conference. I think there was there was a lot of kind of good Baillieu in, in the in the paper and the topics. And you know, we’re hoping that maybe it’s going to help drive Johnston change where beating side and change things around to so, so, so alternately. I guess the question to ask, is how do we do better? You know, we have these academies, now we specialize, we have best practices is there anything that you would that you, if you could make may wave. Magic wand that you put into play. How can we do better? I did a residency at the. I did a residency at the at the university of Delaware did for threatens there under the guidance of insider macadear who’s been acute advocate for the tests. You know, you need to test the folk and there’s been research out there that said, don’t, don’t need an kind of garner monitor to assess quad strikes you all you need is in the extension, machine that every clinic was throwing out a few years back and now the starting to get them out of the trash. So I think it comes down to, you know what take the time out. It’s worth your while for the information that you get just to do repetition, maximum testing if that’s all you have is you have a handheld item ometer, you use both types of testing, but I think it’s taking the time out and maybe sacrificing other parts of your of your treatment to really get the data that you need to make educated decisions. And that’s a valuable thing, right? Giving up some time. But if if, if what you’re presenting his is correct, which we, we would assume that would be since its best practices that time is well, spent, we’ll we’re going to say sorry to cut you off yet. I agree. I think engage in this conversation is actually helpful in getting some of the some of that social media. No on your your, your show. You’ve talked about kind of lag time between evidence to trickle down everyday practice. And I think that the social media conversations really helpful with and they can push us that people probably wouldn’t have picked up the paper or read it beforehand. And there’s there’s so much stuff about about ACL coming out. I mean I mean hundreds of papers every year to try and I get that. But I think trying to just these maybe maybe helped reinforce some of this, you know, the current standard that we think are the best to try to help, you know, get that out to general practitioners that don’t specialize an easy else, but probably Seeven majority of easy L patients because they make up the majority of the general practices that are out there, and maybe helping to adopt you know, the doctor and the guidelines that are that are being put forward. We’ll look at Alex, look the positive at least there are best practices, right? And we’re pushing we’re pushing up professor. Towards finding out what is best that’s great. That’s a great problem to have is. How do we know? How are we going to disseminate that and make sure it gets put into play? At least we got that first part least, we’re really, really paying attention to the first part. Now, if we as you just mentioned, continue to have those conversations, maybe hopefully it’ll help that second part with this emanation last thing. I wanted to ask Eric, you’ve got a unique situation in terms of, of working with students any strategies to encourage students and new clinicians to adopting best practices, and making the change in current practice patterns, to hopefully as they progress in their careers continue that and then teach other students to change the profession.

25:05 – 30:18

Yeah. You know, I had as a an instructor in professor at this point, I tend to utilize a lot of media and podcasts, some of your own actually and other types of logs and things like that after screen through them with my Hyun because I feel like it’s very powerful to hear it from the door at both. So more. Digestible for them than reading the text books. Hearing me talk about it up there. So I utilize that empowers them to get engaged in conversation with the people who are actually putting out literature, and the people who do have experience aside from hearing it from myself as a sage on the stage. I also my mantra to the students are you know they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that, that, that catalyst in the clinic, don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with he that change. Bring the new culture two who’ve been out there who, who may not know what, what is new in the research realm. So I, I really encountered them to be that catalyst that change of the profession, taking it from out of the academic side of things into clinical practice love it. Be the change. Right. It’s not gonna change unless you take what you exactly what it is take what you learn in school, and your clinical rotations and actually, start to do it love that last. Part of the show is the parting shot. It is the parting shot. The Portland shot is brought to you by rock tape more than just the tape company. Rock tape is a movement company, tools and education for medical professionals, if you look at it help, your patients, go stronger longer. Checkout rock tape dot com. You guys have an opportunity to leave one one sentiment with the audience before you go who wants to go first with their partying shop Erica, you kick it off that. All right. So, I guess my parting dot would probably be addictive. Festive, we could do with younger. Patients is its neck with them understand that they’re not an eight the pair, their person who had an affair, and in dealing with kids and dealing with adults. You know you need to manage each person’s differently by using the evidence as your guide, but understanding that you need to tell about intimate independence to the person. And if you could just connect with that person, you’re, you’re, you’re gonna make that person better, regardless of, of. What you do as long as you’re you’re, you’re letting Evan guide you love at Elliot. You’re up and parting shot when he got I think just making sure you continue to grow as a clinician, you know, I think seeing a lot of as the ovation in unfortunately thing, a lot of them hail or have re injury or or secondary injury has has driven me to want to get better. You know. And I think just kind of continuing to grow as condition, and, and, and use those, those events or in that let learning to, to better yourself for the next person around is, is an important thing love that before we go. I’m just you. You’re prescribing podcast episodes, as homework or is outside learning to students love to hear that. I am. I and actually I get made fun of by my other faculty members because of it. But obviously, I listen to a lot of them my forehand. I don’t just give it to them, but I feel like it’s a lot more digestible for them. They can do it while they’re driving into school. They could do it while they’re working out. So. They can work it into their, their everyday life. And it also brings them. They stumble upon other things within that podcast. And it’s more student directed learning after that because they’re like, oh, I listen to this on certain podcast. And then I saw another episode that I was in it really interests me. So it starts to get them on that self directed learning which which is so important for when they do graduate is, how do they, you know, now the information coming to them, they have to go out and seek it? So it teaches them that new skill. You know, selfishly a love to hear that because I host a couple of different podcasts. But I like it because as the as the guy with a degree in communications you’re talking or you’re trying to facilitate a conversation, the way your audience listens. And you’re listening the way your audience talks, and that’s a way to facilitate great conversation instead of what you mentioned earlier being the sage on the stage. That’s a presentation. Right. Some people do learn really well from presentation myself, I’m a conversation guy, obviously. So, you know, selfishly hey, love love to hear that. You’re prescribing assigning podcast episodes, maybe one or two for my show to students, but just love the fact that you’re open to and Anna do want to highlight you mentioned it twice that you do screen through that. Anybody with a microphone create a podcast super easy. But I love the fact that you’re screening it and highlighting. Hey, pay attention to this, and they do after that, if they trip across an episode that hasn’t been screened they need to take that upon themselves because there’s a lot of information in less than great information out there to. Absolutely. I think that’s the most important thing. Is that you’re, you’re, you’re really screening through it to make sure because there’s a lot of stuff out there, that, that maybe you doesn’t really job with the intentions of, of what you want them to get to learn and last point, I’ll make love that too, because once they graduate, they don’t have a professor down the hall or they aren’t running into someone each and every week.

30:19 – 32:32

We’re having that information brought to them, they need to start to seek it out. And think, you know, handing over day of a blog to read or. Podcast, listen to or video channel follow. That’s a great digestible way as we mentioned before, of getting information. Once you start working forty hours a week when you graduate gentlemen, want to say thanks very much for your time. Don’t think it will be the last one. We have you guys on the show, but etc. Service episode with everybody. On the P T cast is a product of p t pint cast LLC it is hosted and produced by p t podcasts. EEO Jim McKay, and CBO sky, Donovan from Marymount university, we talk PT, drink, beer, and record it this has been another poor from the PT pint cast the PD podcasts in ten for educational purposes. Only no clinical decision making should be based solely on one source while Perez, taken to ensure accuracy, factual errors can be present. More on the show at PT podcasts dot com. We’re home on the internet t-, pine cast dot com created by build PT. Build PT provides marketing services, specifically for private practice, PT’s website, development and hosted inviting content marketing solutions PT clinics across the country. See with good PT can do for you. Today dot com. The PT pint cast proudly supports the Travis mills foundation on April tenth twenty twelve United States army staff sergeant Travis mills of the eighty second airborne was critically injured on his third tour of duty in Afghanistan by while on patrol losing portions of both legs, and both arms. He is one of only five quadruple amputees from the wars in Iraq, and Afghanistan to survive his injuries, thanks to his amazing strength, courage, and incredible will to live the heroic actions of the men in his unit. The prayers of thousands and all the healthcare providers at the Walter Reed Army medical center. Travis remains on the road to recovery. He founded the Travis mills foundation, a nonprofit organization formed to benefit and assist. Combat injured. Teran’s. Travis lives by his motto never give up. Never quit to support the Travis mills foundation. Or to find out more visit Travis mills dot org.

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ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg We talk with Eric & Elliot Greenburg (no relation) about ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes.<br /> <br /> Topics hit:<br /> <br /> High rates of ACL injury and repeat injury among youth/adolescent athletes.<br /> <br /> Recent publications of ours that identifying variability of rehabilitation methods in determination of progression of activity following ACL reconstruction among physical therapists and orthopedic surgeons<br /> <br /> Controversy regarding what criteria "should" be used to help determine rehab progression, including return to sports among this population. Translating evidence into practice, which is not occurring according to our survey results. <br /> <br /> How can we optimize rehabilitation in a world of managed care, escalating copays and high deductible insurance plans. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 32:32
F*CK INSURANCE! A book by Danny Matta https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/03/19/fck-insurance-a-book-by-danny-matta/ Tue, 19 Mar 2019 10:00:07 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5373 Transcript Before we get started. If you're in the state of North Carolina, we're headed to North Carolina State student conclave all these dudes getting together Elon university. If you're out there, make sure to say, hi, always great to have this guy on the show. Danny comes on the program. Dude wrote a book we get into what it's called. It's an explicit title. Very naughty. We may get to play with the belief out button. A few times in this episode. And just so you know, we mentioned at during the episode how to win it or give it away copies of his book plus a chance to get a one on one phone call. If you're thinking about jumping into biz PT opened a cash practice much like Danny and the people he works with. So stay tuned info to win that book in the consultation. Call all in the episode first round is brought to you by Owens recovery. Science a single source for PT's looking for certification in personalized blood flow restriction rehabilitation training, Johnny and his team. They're on the forefront. Doing the research testing releasing the papers about this stuff there. The goldstein. Wondered check them out online at Owens recovery. Science dot com. Broadcasting physical therapists around the world is this is the PT past. May I introduce to introduce you. Here's your host physical therapist Jimmy MacKay back on the show, host of the podcast and founder of athletes potential in Atlanta and Decatur Georgia. Adel comeback show, ma'am. Yes. Jimmy. Thank you so much for having me on again it easily my favorite podcast to be on good job of like interviewing people and just so like team listen to south you, and it's also cool. I don't know if I have a record in anything else. But when I told my I'm gonna tell my wife about this. And I she's gonna find me more tractive. Honestly, that's what I bring table. You bring that. Mabel up here. More attractive, but we gotta add something else to your resume. I mean, we should also let people know you do business coaching specifically within the world of physical therapy. But now, author I'll be honest, Pat myself on the back when I read a book, and you went out, and you wrote a book. Yeah. For somebody that also I have probably about fifty books that I'm halfway through have way through media. And I told my wife I was like, but if you add up the fifty percent of all of them, I'm through twenty five. Good. That's pretty good. Yeah. It's pretty solid. I just quick to kind of move on to something else. So the fact that actually sat down and for eight months put together my thought process on what I've learned in business. So for in particular in the cash practice realm is an interesting to me that actually you know, was able to finish it. But also, it's it's something that I think that will be there and my kids can pick it up and not granted the titles of extreme. But they're no they're no strangers to f word in the house, by the way, they they can use it in context, and they're five and seven I mean, they can read and they can see like, oh, man. Mom and dad like, wow, they did this thing. And you know, they started this business. And I kinda talk about how I got started. I have kind of like an interesting story about how we left the military and went into business that we knew nothing about and some of the mistakes we made along the way which is a lot and hopefully people can learn from that. And then we really dive into stages of a cash practice, which I think are important in. No because I look at like martial arts. You know, you don't just go one day and say, okay, I'm just going to get a black belt. You may think that, but you know, you go and you. For a while. And then you get a blue belt, and you get a purple belt. And then you have these stages along the way this show that you're improving your learning new things, and you should celebrate those. So for me, I thought it was important to define the stage of cash practice, then to go through the two main kind of linchpins that ...

ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg | 2 hrs ago

0:00 – 05:14

Hi, I’m Alexa. You can now hear PT podcast. Using me just say, hey Alexa, launched PT, pint cast, or you could be nice and try saying, please for lunch, what is being polite? Dead these days to your episodes, just say, hey Alexa, launch PT pint cast, maybe throw in a please. At the end my monitor the -tudents are they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that Cadillac in the clinic. Don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with e that change. Bring the new culture two out there who, who may not know what is new in the research realm. So I really in power them to be that catalyst that change of the freshen taking your from the academic side of things into clinical practice. Get a chance to talk to the greenberg’s. Eric in Elliot Greenberg. No relation. They had a couple of publications about ACL rehab and best practices. We. Best practices, but are those best practices being put into practice? So did there. So they took a look at it from an orthopedic surgeon perspective, physical therapist, perspective, and really, ultimately wanted to see why or why not those best practices were being actually utilized. So we took a talk with those two guys at the same time in this episode take a listen. I think it’s got insights beyond just ACL rehab, right? Re really insights into where’s the fall off in best practice to actual practice. So we’re going to get into that with these guys episode brought to you by Owens recovery, science, a single source for PT’s looking for certification in personalized blood flow, restriction rehabilitation training and the equipment, you need to apply in your clinical practice Zach Ephron on social media, just see. And he’s going through ACL rehab, and using har-. So that’s, that’s kind of cool to see in the mainstream, and he did a little shout to his great physical therapist athletic trainers going through rehab. So check it out, Owens recovery science dot com. If you’d like to get certified. And grab that equipment, we do want to let you know, we have another podcast that’s been launched. N. P T E, study cast, helping students study for the board exams. So check it out wherever podcast or heard. I tunes Google play Spotify. N P, T E, study cast, it is brought to you by our friends at Arias medical staffing without them. We wouldn’t be able to bring it to you. We also have free downloadable study guides for each of the episodes short to the point episodes between three and nine minutes on average about the one hundred fifty most asked about path on the N P. So check that out. N P T study cast, now available ever podcast, hurt the best conversations happen at happy hour, welcome to hours forum award. This is the P T podcasts, here’s your host, physical therapist, Jimmy MacKay the best conversations happen at happy hour. Welcome two hours your next episode of PT podcast starch right now bring it into to grow. Converge do not get confused. They are not related Elliott and Eric Greenberg. Welcome to the show guys. I’d give negative. Thanks. I have an excellent art. So we’ll start with Elliott Elliott. What’s, what’s your background, which are the audience know about you about what, what you do in your daily life daily life? I’ve kind of limit role. I work at children’s Philadelphia about three-quarters clinician, and about one quarter researcher here special interest in knee, and shoulder injuries particular ACL’s, because what I see a lot of glad heavy Elliott and Eric. What’s your superhero back story here, backdoor, the right now? I’m on Long Island and I may. In Europe, at the New York technology where I even the curriculum, it’d be program, but also treat the NYC athlete. And my current interest include working with obviously the population with lower injuries and running related injury. Excellent. So how’d you guys meet anyway? I mean I know you know Elliott, you’re, you’re at shop Philly. Eric, you’re in New York. But have you guys cross paths was was it the same conference and picked up the others name tag because you both have the same last name or what? Yeah, it’s kind of a long story, but. I we unknowingly you know, kinda sorta cross paths, a long time in our in our in our lives together. But we, we did end up. We worked together at shop for a little while. And that’s really how he really got. No each other and work together, and kinda, formerly Egypt. So both of you guys have special interests in lower shrimp, the injuries Elliott working with pediatric and adolescent, sportsmed. Eric doing the same with some college athletes, and being a practicing as well. How did you guys decide to get together and do some research, and then we’ll get into what it was and where the audience can find it. Burqa started on the research paths together while we were together at shop. We did come out with a more retrospective analysis looking at the pediatric strengthen front-row, turn in the pediatric athlete, and then it kind of bird into a little more while, and I remember very closely when Elliott our standing next to each other at CSM, how long it was it remember that in California, I think, when whenever the Anaheim yeah, yeah.

05:15 – 10:04

Book that we has had this idea like, you know, we’re coming out with all these recognitions, but we really don’t know what it is that peaky are actually doing out there in terms of whites, specifically, a C L rehab returned to play return to sport return to life. Yeah. So when we were working together at shop, we do a lot of these functional and strength testing on patients that we weren’t really seeing. And when we were talking to them while they while they were coming in. You were getting again, gambit whole gambit as far as what they were doing regarding every in along with what kind of critique. Syrian that they’re, they’re practicing teachers were using this got us to thinking about, you know, yes, there are recommendations and guidelines out there, but is there that much variability out there in nickel practice? Gotcha. So you’re seeing what all the research was, and that’s what you’re doing at CSM, but you’re saying what’s actually being done, what where’s, where’s the translation? What’s the hand off from research and best practices to what’s actually being done with athletes? Yeah, I think yeah. And I think it also kind of reverse too, because we had that kinda unique experience at shop. Where are surging kind of require their patients to come the are there teams are to make sure they are functional testing program, where they the L part of that is, it’s great because we get interacted patient that we’re not treating on a day-to-day basis, we’re seeing at three months post op or six months and saying, all right. Tell me what you’re doing. And we hear from the patient’s perspective, are they are they following of, like, what we would consider to be best practice guidelines what have they done? Maybe prior to come. In and the patient, assessing aunts. And then, and then we give to CSM we hear what all this really great research is saying, man, we should be doing. We should be doing more. We shouldn’t do, and it’s like, but, you know, the, the patients that we have coming in from outside, our walls, or maybe not even doing happened that too. So it’s like, you know, it really spurred that idea what, what happened was the general practitioner that seeing, you know, maybe mostly maybe low back pain, or older patients when they get kind of SEAL that walkner door, you know, that they may not be a specialist in these the what is what does that person doing to make decisions about returns person, the play I like how it was formulated, organically, guys standing there together at, at CSM and saying, hey, what about this? Why don’t we take a look at the cool part was you guys went and follow through, and you wind up doing it. So, so talk about what happened next after that moment, when you actually follow through, we kind of formulated the idea, and we brought together, what we’ve dealt with a really good team, people with orthopedic surgeons that we work with here at job, and in PT’s, and we kinda got the, the survey. Of what we wanted to the question that we wanted to ask formulated together. And then we thought, hey, great idea, not only look at what therapists are doing. But on the other side, we look at the PD surgeon, they’re doing as well. So he came up with this idea of maybe the three sixty degrees, scope of people that are involved in, in these rehab decision, seeing what if kind of the Philip how to be in the orthopedic surgeons are kind of the overall directors, they’re the ones that are delivering the protocols for their patients. And, you know, saying this is what should be done. You know, we should see what they think about package patterns TT’s, or the one we’re in the trenches were the ones that actually were applying testing. But we feel should be best. You know what is what the P T say we wanted to kind of see what are both sides would say. And then maybe the compare contrast and draw conclusions from that. Unlike the more like a time line and being able to see again, what’s, what’s best practice. That’s great. But what’s actually being done on both ends in terms of the orthopedic surgeons and then the follow through with the, the physical therapists after? The surgery. So, so how’d you guys approach it and, and what you guys fine. Let’s get into the nitty gritty yet for one of the biggest things that we found was that there was a large variability, not physical therapist, but also with the orthopedic surgeon, and I think it really probably under floors, or underestimates, the ability out there, because the sample that we took from was the sports section with exception in private practice section, or what formerly known as those sections, I should say with their new name changes. But it’s a pretty, if you think about it a homogeneous sample of people, you would think that would be in the know of the current landscape of the literature, who would probably under floors, or under made the, the true, very villi out there similarly that we, we found even more variety in the orthopedic population, certain population, and that was the sample of pediatric orthopedic surgeon from the research and sports medicine group prison. Group, once again, a very homogeneous sample that tends to be a little bit more up to date with their with their current recommendation. So we, we were, we were quite quick deprived prize, the degree of Billy that we found, so, so I just want to stop you there to make sure I understand what you’re saying, and make sure the audience gets it too.

10:04 – 15:09

So you’re saying this groups free homogeneous you figured it, would they be more well informed because these are the people who go out of their way to not only be members but to be section or academy members and seek out the research, so they should have been sticking to or at least be closer to the best practice guidelines that have been put forth so far. But you saw variability, which you’re saying really really, really highlights how much variability was out there that you couldn’t even reach at xactly yet. Okay. I just didn’t wanna make sure I, I want to make sure I understood that. So it’s okay that is that is pretty telling what were some of the results you want to get into some of the some of the highlights. And some of the things that you guys found that maybe surprise you or didn’t surprise you. If you think about the decision. Making profits or what you’re the tools. You’re using from, from time based parameters to some type of strength criteria to some type of stumps performance measure to maybe some type of patient outcome measure or psychological attachment or contract dry. I mean, the variation existed across all of those, but even some of the more kind of would you consider maybe more concrete things like time we’re not even agreeing on time when the progress patience right now and you think that there’s probably the better most amount of research looking to support like those simple those, those type of concrete things. But we can’t even agree. And then when you start drilling down into the details about well, are reassessing strength and a lot of everybody agreed like. Yeah. Strength is important. But then we asked, how are you assessing strength that then variability just started from there? Right. And some people there was a large proportion of the sample PT’s that, you know, just relied on manual muscle testing to progress their patients and kind of what the literature showing is that, you know, we’re not going to be able to. Identify these higher levels of gases. Pete that may exist for these patients, when they’re strong but they’re just not strong enough using now montage, tonight’s lesion. But then when people are using either more objective measures, like handle their no mama tree. Or there’s availability rice the testing the standard that which they’re holding them to the variability just continues to progress where some people required seventy five percent. Maybe limbs imaging index and some people were maybe above one hundred percent. It’s there’s just, you know, the organizer surprised they as we drill down. You know, the win the details of what we’re doing and everyday practice, we can agree on broad strokes. We can agree that strengthening important, the man when you start like measuring strength like how you’re actually applying and doing that. That’s really different from everybody. Do you see in the framework is there? But how you actually apply and actually measure things like time or strength, which everyone pretty much agrees on being important factors to take into consideration when you start. Looking even smaller there. That’s where you see even more the very variability come into play. Yeah. Yeah. Eric, what do you want more like the devil? That was in the house a little bit like he talked to finishing tonight and nobody’s gonna argue that strength that meet strength. This is not going to be important. But I think once you start to, to hammer down on to power, they testing or something the strength of, of, of their patients. Are you really comparing apples to apples when when you start to go across different clinics, clinician and patients? And I think it really does create a little bit confusion, not just in the PT population in the clinic population. But Auckland patients to talk with one another, when they’re like, oh, yeah. I think cleared how they took your or yeah, they, they hooked me up to this machine four times. And, and I have to get at least ninety cent and the other person’s like oh, I’ve never done that before. And they’re back on the field plan already. I think it really does create a little bit of confusion within the society as well as are we really treating the same patients across different clinicians in clinic. And practitioners in the same profession. You know, right. That’s and that’s a great example of when you get to patients together, and they say, oh, we have the same injury, we must have done the same type of rehab, or at least hit these big big benchmarks. And when they’re different that’s confusing. And again, I get it, you know, patients are different from patient to patient. But if this is what best practices are, how come there’s so much variability? What were you able to hone in and either measure and ask, or at least if not speculate? Why is it? Why, why do we take it upon ourselves to, to have so much variability within the PT arm of the survey that we thought he’d be able to get one of those details? We, we tried to look at commision doctor that maybe influenced some of their him their decision that the us. So we had we kind of broke people down into, like either, high volume or low volume practitioners, where we said, anybody that treated more than ten miles per year. We accounted for them at high volume. Actitities and those less than that were low volume. We looked at certified specialists versus not certified specialists. And we don’t think years of clinical experience, and you know, if we if we use, we don’t know what that program is or, you know, like like you said, a few times we have our current, you know, Beth standard that we have our practice standard.

15:09 – 20:08

But we know if those are ideal hopefully change as we continue to learn more. But if we lived up to characteristics of the clinicians relative to the decision, they were making it seem like certified specialists were more likely to follow either which beat, of course, board certified specialists more likely to follow those kind of current practice guideline, and also those clinicians that were that were into our high volume clinicians seem to kind of follow more those best practice standards. So jor Beth is kind of what we’ve only result is that meeting. Those conditions are maybe more tied into the current literature or maybe by into the current literature more maybe see the investment in their practice going out. Of the way there, that’s a self selected group, which we started talking about the top of the show. These are people who say when your SAS, or when you’re seeing high volume, I’m I better, I better be doing the best because I’m practices wise because I’m seeing so many of these types of patients, these specific type of patients each and every year variability in terms of testing, I could imagine sometimes would have to do with ability of Quebec. Right. Each practice setting is going to be different. Yeah, definitely. And I think Becky him about a up in some of our speculation that people that had can be high volume a, you know, probably see the investment in an economic Donna, Mamata, or even like a handheld on a monitor roof with someone who may maybe in a facility where they’re not being as many of those types of patients may not be willing to invest in something because there’s no cost benefit for them or return on their investment in the long term. And obviously, there are other financial issues that you come across. Basis issues potentially. So I think there’s a lot of confounding issues that could arrive that can reason why someone is not using this type of instrumentation where can work in the audience, find this and, and download and kind of consumer themselves want to make sure they get access to it. Yes. The PTA survey published in jail at BT in October issue. Twenty eighteen and me surge in order big surgeon arm of the study was just published last month on in the orthopedic journalist sports medicine, Zingo them, and you can download that, that’s a full tech there, you can download full text there. No problem. What, what was the what was some of the attitudes of people who participated in this after the, the results will reveal work were they shocked were they surprised to were they, you know, pledging to, to change their practice because they saw such variability or anything come out of that, you know, I don’t think it was that surprising. I think I think disturbing survey kinda showed what everybody coming, Verdy thought. Victor knew existed that there’s variation out there and everyone’s like, wow, I, I knew it was variable. But I didn’t think it was very -able. You know what I think that was kind of, like just reinforced them the some of the thoughts, we did get a couple of emails from people like saying, hey, this is this is really nice really enjoyed remiss kinda good study, but I don’t know air and different Binyamin that no you know what it was interesting. I think you’ve gotta lar- a lot of publicity on social media platforms almost like the like a shock value of you need to do better. You know, by no means do I think you are. Is it is it bulletproof is it the best thing out there? Is it catching all people who may be at risk? But, but at least it’s the best we have at this point. But it seems if people aren’t even doing that at this point. So how could we really say that it’s not doing what it claims to be doing? If people aren’t there aren’t really doing it. So I think it, it really gained some headway on, on the media platform of saying, hey guys, let’s do a little bit better out there. I like that good. Take a quick break want to thank our sponsors are east medical staffing for keeping the show on the air. They find jobs, whether you’re gonna do so Adelphia or Long Island or anywhere you want to do a beach a lake. He wanna go mountains. He want to ski you can do that. That’s the cool part of variability in our in our profession is people need PT all over. So go do what you want where you want to do it. And Arias get you set up a U, R, E US, medical dot com. Not only just having the positions. But as well as being with a walkie through all the pain points. What do I do if I’m licensed in New York? But I want to go work in California for a couple of months they’ve got people on board to help you walk you through that. So you’re not on your own housing. How do you find where to live and is the person that use hiring you? They pay for that. They’ve got someone to walk you through that as well. The thing that could knit freaked me out the most was taxes. If you live in New York, but you’re temporarily working in Colorado. What do you do again? Arias has someone for that as well. So check them out, if you want to do a short term placement or look into relocate long-term, a U, R, E US medical dot com. Where, where would you guys go if you could go anywhere in the fifty states, if you do exactly what you wanna do what state, haven’t you been to that? You would give shot for thirteen weeks.

20:09 – 25:05

What bait haven’t I been to? Well, I was thinking more of that. I have been to Florida gator, we go down to Pensacola Beach, Florida every odd year for a week, and that is one of my favorite places in the United States. But opera played the haven’t been to having not ally. They had not been there, I would probably pick some somewhere in the mountain bikers aggo could Pacific northwest. Well at school party where the fifty states check him out. You are US medical dot com. Extent stay tuned. The we’ll be right back to the P T on cast. If you look at for education passed your physical therapy degree, look no further than Brooks. H L, Brooks rehabilitation institute of higher learning you could find out more Brooks, I h l dot org continuing education along with residencies and fellowships residencies in Orthopaedics, geriatrics, women’s health, neurologic PT, pediatrics, sports, and fellowship opportunity as well. So look into it if you’re looking to expand your knowledge base Brooks, IHL dot org to the typecast with Jimmy MacKay question. How was the how are the views or how was the reaction you guys mentioned, some kind of shock value on on social media saying, hey, come almost a rallying cry. But we, we need to do better. Let’s do better. Was there any reaction from the orthopedic surgeons since they’re the kind of the first touch point in the patient, and then they pass them off to us betcha they expect us to be doing best practices? What was their reaction to the results? I haven’t seen much reaction to the there’s a lot more talk about it and probably considerable Eric. And I of fly in within the realm when we did present it that at conference. We got a lot of really good feedback. We actually won best paper award at the prison conference the year, we did present this at that conference. I think there was there was a lot of kind of good Baillieu in, in the in the paper and the topics. And you know, we’re hoping that maybe it’s going to help drive Johnston change where beating side and change things around to so, so, so alternately. I guess the question to ask, is how do we do better? You know, we have these academies, now we specialize, we have best practices is there anything that you would that you, if you could make may wave. Magic wand that you put into play. How can we do better? I did a residency at the. I did a residency at the at the university of Delaware did for threatens there under the guidance of insider macadear who’s been acute advocate for the tests. You know, you need to test the folk and there’s been research out there that said, don’t, don’t need an kind of garner monitor to assess quad strikes you all you need is in the extension, machine that every clinic was throwing out a few years back and now the starting to get them out of the trash. So I think it comes down to, you know what take the time out. It’s worth your while for the information that you get just to do repetition, maximum testing if that’s all you have is you have a handheld item ometer, you use both types of testing, but I think it’s taking the time out and maybe sacrificing other parts of your of your treatment to really get the data that you need to make educated decisions. And that’s a valuable thing, right? Giving up some time. But if if, if what you’re presenting his is correct, which we, we would assume that would be since its best practices that time is well, spent, we’ll we’re going to say sorry to cut you off yet. I agree. I think engage in this conversation is actually helpful in getting some of the some of that social media. No on your your, your show. You’ve talked about kind of lag time between evidence to trickle down everyday practice. And I think that the social media conversations really helpful with and they can push us that people probably wouldn’t have picked up the paper or read it beforehand. And there’s there’s so much stuff about about ACL coming out. I mean I mean hundreds of papers every year to try and I get that. But I think trying to just these maybe maybe helped reinforce some of this, you know, the current standard that we think are the best to try to help, you know, get that out to general practitioners that don’t specialize an easy else, but probably Seeven majority of easy L patients because they make up the majority of the general practices that are out there, and maybe helping to adopt you know, the doctor and the guidelines that are that are being put forward. We’ll look at Alex, look the positive at least there are best practices, right? And we’re pushing we’re pushing up professor. Towards finding out what is best that’s great. That’s a great problem to have is. How do we know? How are we going to disseminate that and make sure it gets put into play? At least we got that first part least, we’re really, really paying attention to the first part. Now, if we as you just mentioned, continue to have those conversations, maybe hopefully it’ll help that second part with this emanation last thing. I wanted to ask Eric, you’ve got a unique situation in terms of, of working with students any strategies to encourage students and new clinicians to adopting best practices, and making the change in current practice patterns, to hopefully as they progress in their careers continue that and then teach other students to change the profession.

25:05 – 30:18

Yeah. You know, I had as a an instructor in professor at this point, I tend to utilize a lot of media and podcasts, some of your own actually and other types of logs and things like that after screen through them with my Hyun because I feel like it’s very powerful to hear it from the door at both. So more. Digestible for them than reading the text books. Hearing me talk about it up there. So I utilize that empowers them to get engaged in conversation with the people who are actually putting out literature, and the people who do have experience aside from hearing it from myself as a sage on the stage. I also my mantra to the students are you know they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that, that, that catalyst in the clinic, don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with he that change. Bring the new culture two who’ve been out there who, who may not know what, what is new in the research realm. So I, I really encountered them to be that catalyst that change of the profession, taking it from out of the academic side of things into clinical practice love it. Be the change. Right. It’s not gonna change unless you take what you exactly what it is take what you learn in school, and your clinical rotations and actually, start to do it love that last. Part of the show is the parting shot. It is the parting shot. The Portland shot is brought to you by rock tape more than just the tape company. Rock tape is a movement company, tools and education for medical professionals, if you look at it help, your patients, go stronger longer. Checkout rock tape dot com. You guys have an opportunity to leave one one sentiment with the audience before you go who wants to go first with their partying shop Erica, you kick it off that. All right. So, I guess my parting dot would probably be addictive. Festive, we could do with younger. Patients is its neck with them understand that they’re not an eight the pair, their person who had an affair, and in dealing with kids and dealing with adults. You know you need to manage each person’s differently by using the evidence as your guide, but understanding that you need to tell about intimate independence to the person. And if you could just connect with that person, you’re, you’re, you’re gonna make that person better, regardless of, of. What you do as long as you’re you’re, you’re letting Evan guide you love at Elliot. You’re up and parting shot when he got I think just making sure you continue to grow as a clinician, you know, I think seeing a lot of as the ovation in unfortunately thing, a lot of them hail or have re injury or or secondary injury has has driven me to want to get better. You know. And I think just kind of continuing to grow as condition, and, and, and use those, those events or in that let learning to, to better yourself for the next person around is, is an important thing love that before we go. I’m just you. You’re prescribing podcast episodes, as homework or is outside learning to students love to hear that. I am. I and actually I get made fun of by my other faculty members because of it. But obviously, I listen to a lot of them my forehand. I don’t just give it to them, but I feel like it’s a lot more digestible for them. They can do it while they’re driving into school. They could do it while they’re working out. So. They can work it into their, their everyday life. And it also brings them. They stumble upon other things within that podcast. And it’s more student directed learning after that because they’re like, oh, I listen to this on certain podcast. And then I saw another episode that I was in it really interests me. So it starts to get them on that self directed learning which which is so important for when they do graduate is, how do they, you know, now the information coming to them, they have to go out and seek it? So it teaches them that new skill. You know, selfishly a love to hear that because I host a couple of different podcasts. But I like it because as the as the guy with a degree in communications you’re talking or you’re trying to facilitate a conversation, the way your audience listens. And you’re listening the way your audience talks, and that’s a way to facilitate great conversation instead of what you mentioned earlier being the sage on the stage. That’s a presentation. Right. Some people do learn really well from presentation myself, I’m a conversation guy, obviously. So, you know, selfishly hey, love love to hear that. You’re prescribing assigning podcast episodes, maybe one or two for my show to students, but just love the fact that you’re open to and Anna do want to highlight you mentioned it twice that you do screen through that. Anybody with a microphone create a podcast super easy. But I love the fact that you’re screening it and highlighting. Hey, pay attention to this, and they do after that, if they trip across an episode that hasn’t been screened they need to take that upon themselves because there’s a lot of information in less than great information out there to. Absolutely. I think that’s the most important thing. Is that you’re, you’re, you’re really screening through it to make sure because there’s a lot of stuff out there, that, that maybe you doesn’t really job with the intentions of, of what you want them to get to learn and last point, I’ll make love that too, because once they graduate, they don’t have a professor down the hall or they aren’t running into someone each and every week.

30:19 – 32:32

We’re having that information brought to them, they need to start to seek it out. And think, you know, handing over day of a blog to read or. Podcast, listen to or video channel follow. That’s a great digestible way as we mentioned before, of getting information. Once you start working forty hours a week when you graduate gentlemen, want to say thanks very much for your time. Don’t think it will be the last one. We have you guys on the show, but etc. Service episode with everybody. On the P T cast is a product of p t pint cast LLC it is hosted and produced by p t podcasts. EEO Jim McKay, and CBO sky, Donovan from Marymount university, we talk PT, drink, beer, and record it this has been another poor from the PT pint cast the PD podcasts in ten for educational purposes. Only no clinical decision making should be based solely on one source while Perez, taken to ensure accuracy, factual errors can be present. More on the show at PT podcasts dot com. We’re home on the internet t-, pine cast dot com created by build PT. Build PT provides marketing services, specifically for private practice, PT’s website, development and hosted inviting content marketing solutions PT clinics across the country. See with good PT can do for you. Today dot com. The PT pint cast proudly supports the Travis mills foundation on April tenth twenty twelve United States army staff sergeant Travis mills of the eighty second airborne was critically injured on his third tour of duty in Afghanistan by while on patrol losing portions of both legs, and both arms. He is one of only five quadruple amputees from the wars in Iraq, and Afghanistan to survive his injuries, thanks to his amazing strength, courage, and incredible will to live the heroic actions of the men in his unit. The prayers of thousands and all the healthcare providers at the Walter Reed Army medical center. Travis remains on the road to recovery. He founded the Travis mills foundation, a nonprofit organization formed to benefit and assist. Combat injured. Teran’s. Travis lives by his motto never give up. Never quit to support the Travis mills foundation. Or to find out more visit Travis mills dot org.

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ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg We talk with Eric & Elliot Greenburg (no relation) about ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes.<br /> <br /> Topics hit:<br /> <br /> High rates of ACL injury and repeat injury among youth/adolescent athletes.<br /> <br /> Recent publications of ours that identifying variability of rehabilitation methods in determination of progression of activity following ACL reconstruction among physical therapists and orthopedic surgeons<br /> <br /> Controversy regarding what criteria "should" be used to help determine rehab progression, including return to sports among this population. Translating evidence into practice, which is not occurring according to our survey results. <br /> <br /> How can we optimize rehabilitation in a world of managed care, escalating copays and high deductible insurance plans. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 32:32
Do you want to know the truth? With Erik Meira https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/03/14/do-you-want-to-know-the-truth-with-erik-meira/ Thu, 14 Mar 2019 19:26:38 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5375 Transcript Do you wanna know the truth or do you want to have been right? And the best way to do. That is to continuously ask yourself what other explanations, you could find for anything that you believe how else could you see the world or see a particular thing that that you're witnessing. You know, whether it's in the clinic, and you're watching the the results of an intervention. How are all the ways you can explain those results and be as crazy as you want? I mean, the whole idea there is, you know, it's okay to be thinking and just to be throwing ideas out because a lot of times, you'll some across something that all of a sudden that actually is more likely, and that would change the way I would use this intervention. Keep things thinking. No stranger to show as guest today is Eric Mera. Eric was one of our very first guest. When we started this crazy show back in two thousand fifteen. He's also got his own show called PT inquest. We talk about that what goes into us programming than the pitfalls of that. And some different ways to to look at things that you probably look at a lot. That's I think what Eric's best at is highlighting those things and letting you see things differently. He he's great at that show's brought to you by Owens recovery. Science can't say enough about Johnny Owens and his team. They're just a great organization if you're looking to get certified and personalized blood flow restriction rehabilitation training. Plus, they they have the equipment you need to apply that plus what they also have for free is the research. They're the guys doing the research on this. They're leading the field all around the world. So check out what they have going on at Owens recovery. Science dot com. Broadcasting to physical therapists around the world is this is the PT pine cast. May I introduce me to introduce you to here's your host, physical therapist, Jimmy MacKay. Best conversations happen at happy hour. Welcome two hours. No stranger to the program. Back on the show is Eric Mera. Eric thanks for coming back, man. Hey, thanks for having me back. I always enjoy chatting with you Jimmy and just for the audience's knowledge because we're we did this yesterday and failed computer messed up and didn't record the conversation full. So I was like man we had such a great conversation. That was a great driver on. Let's do it again. So for the audience take two, it's okay. I don't I don't remember many conversations. I have anyway. So yeah, we wanted to want to bring you on. If anybody doesn't know Eric in his work. He's got his own podcast called P T inquest. You can find that wherever podcasts are sold. And by Seoul. We mean giving away for free, which is itchy and you're on Spotify. We found out. That's right. Yeah. When we try to record this the first time, you're asking me about and I was like, I don't think I'm on Spotify. But yeah, I've actually been on Spotify. For awhile apparent when people find that you have podcast for me to like. Okay. Cool. Your dork. What's your show about that was kind of like ask? When people ask you about PT inquest. What are you? What do you tell? Oh, ours is a very specific show. I do it with j w Matheson, it's a I like to describe it as a online journal club. So we get an article we the the two of us up over Skype, and we just talk about the article what it says what it doesn't say. You know, Jay w I h have over twenty years of experience as cynical therapists. And we've always been pretty tight with the with research in general and studying research, and so just having that that background of seeing a lot of papers for a couple of decades. Now, we can really give a lot of insight into into what emerging research is trying to accomplish. And how it how it kind of is interpreted in the context of previous research while you're like the guy from the matrix in the beginning when Neil I wakes up. He sees the screen, and it's all ones and zeroes.

ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg | 2 hrs ago

0:00 – 05:14

Hi, I’m Alexa. You can now hear PT podcast. Using me just say, hey Alexa, launched PT, pint cast, or you could be nice and try saying, please for lunch, what is being polite? Dead these days to your episodes, just say, hey Alexa, launch PT pint cast, maybe throw in a please. At the end my monitor the -tudents are they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that Cadillac in the clinic. Don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with e that change. Bring the new culture two out there who, who may not know what is new in the research realm. So I really in power them to be that catalyst that change of the freshen taking your from the academic side of things into clinical practice. Get a chance to talk to the greenberg’s. Eric in Elliot Greenberg. No relation. They had a couple of publications about ACL rehab and best practices. We. Best practices, but are those best practices being put into practice? So did there. So they took a look at it from an orthopedic surgeon perspective, physical therapist, perspective, and really, ultimately wanted to see why or why not those best practices were being actually utilized. So we took a talk with those two guys at the same time in this episode take a listen. I think it’s got insights beyond just ACL rehab, right? Re really insights into where’s the fall off in best practice to actual practice. So we’re going to get into that with these guys episode brought to you by Owens recovery, science, a single source for PT’s looking for certification in personalized blood flow, restriction rehabilitation training and the equipment, you need to apply in your clinical practice Zach Ephron on social media, just see. And he’s going through ACL rehab, and using har-. So that’s, that’s kind of cool to see in the mainstream, and he did a little shout to his great physical therapist athletic trainers going through rehab. So check it out, Owens recovery science dot com. If you’d like to get certified. And grab that equipment, we do want to let you know, we have another podcast that’s been launched. N. P T E, study cast, helping students study for the board exams. So check it out wherever podcast or heard. I tunes Google play Spotify. N P, T E, study cast, it is brought to you by our friends at Arias medical staffing without them. We wouldn’t be able to bring it to you. We also have free downloadable study guides for each of the episodes short to the point episodes between three and nine minutes on average about the one hundred fifty most asked about path on the N P. So check that out. N P T study cast, now available ever podcast, hurt the best conversations happen at happy hour, welcome to hours forum award. This is the P T podcasts, here’s your host, physical therapist, Jimmy MacKay the best conversations happen at happy hour. Welcome two hours your next episode of PT podcast starch right now bring it into to grow. Converge do not get confused. They are not related Elliott and Eric Greenberg. Welcome to the show guys. I’d give negative. Thanks. I have an excellent art. So we’ll start with Elliott Elliott. What’s, what’s your background, which are the audience know about you about what, what you do in your daily life daily life? I’ve kind of limit role. I work at children’s Philadelphia about three-quarters clinician, and about one quarter researcher here special interest in knee, and shoulder injuries particular ACL’s, because what I see a lot of glad heavy Elliott and Eric. What’s your superhero back story here, backdoor, the right now? I’m on Long Island and I may. In Europe, at the New York technology where I even the curriculum, it’d be program, but also treat the NYC athlete. And my current interest include working with obviously the population with lower injuries and running related injury. Excellent. So how’d you guys meet anyway? I mean I know you know Elliott, you’re, you’re at shop Philly. Eric, you’re in New York. But have you guys cross paths was was it the same conference and picked up the others name tag because you both have the same last name or what? Yeah, it’s kind of a long story, but. I we unknowingly you know, kinda sorta cross paths, a long time in our in our in our lives together. But we, we did end up. We worked together at shop for a little while. And that’s really how he really got. No each other and work together, and kinda, formerly Egypt. So both of you guys have special interests in lower shrimp, the injuries Elliott working with pediatric and adolescent, sportsmed. Eric doing the same with some college athletes, and being a practicing as well. How did you guys decide to get together and do some research, and then we’ll get into what it was and where the audience can find it. Burqa started on the research paths together while we were together at shop. We did come out with a more retrospective analysis looking at the pediatric strengthen front-row, turn in the pediatric athlete, and then it kind of bird into a little more while, and I remember very closely when Elliott our standing next to each other at CSM, how long it was it remember that in California, I think, when whenever the Anaheim yeah, yeah.

05:15 – 10:04

Book that we has had this idea like, you know, we’re coming out with all these recognitions, but we really don’t know what it is that peaky are actually doing out there in terms of whites, specifically, a C L rehab returned to play return to sport return to life. Yeah. So when we were working together at shop, we do a lot of these functional and strength testing on patients that we weren’t really seeing. And when we were talking to them while they while they were coming in. You were getting again, gambit whole gambit as far as what they were doing regarding every in along with what kind of critique. Syrian that they’re, they’re practicing teachers were using this got us to thinking about, you know, yes, there are recommendations and guidelines out there, but is there that much variability out there in nickel practice? Gotcha. So you’re seeing what all the research was, and that’s what you’re doing at CSM, but you’re saying what’s actually being done, what where’s, where’s the translation? What’s the hand off from research and best practices to what’s actually being done with athletes? Yeah, I think yeah. And I think it also kind of reverse too, because we had that kinda unique experience at shop. Where are surging kind of require their patients to come the are there teams are to make sure they are functional testing program, where they the L part of that is, it’s great because we get interacted patient that we’re not treating on a day-to-day basis, we’re seeing at three months post op or six months and saying, all right. Tell me what you’re doing. And we hear from the patient’s perspective, are they are they following of, like, what we would consider to be best practice guidelines what have they done? Maybe prior to come. In and the patient, assessing aunts. And then, and then we give to CSM we hear what all this really great research is saying, man, we should be doing. We should be doing more. We shouldn’t do, and it’s like, but, you know, the, the patients that we have coming in from outside, our walls, or maybe not even doing happened that too. So it’s like, you know, it really spurred that idea what, what happened was the general practitioner that seeing, you know, maybe mostly maybe low back pain, or older patients when they get kind of SEAL that walkner door, you know, that they may not be a specialist in these the what is what does that person doing to make decisions about returns person, the play I like how it was formulated, organically, guys standing there together at, at CSM and saying, hey, what about this? Why don’t we take a look at the cool part was you guys went and follow through, and you wind up doing it. So, so talk about what happened next after that moment, when you actually follow through, we kind of formulated the idea, and we brought together, what we’ve dealt with a really good team, people with orthopedic surgeons that we work with here at job, and in PT’s, and we kinda got the, the survey. Of what we wanted to the question that we wanted to ask formulated together. And then we thought, hey, great idea, not only look at what therapists are doing. But on the other side, we look at the PD surgeon, they’re doing as well. So he came up with this idea of maybe the three sixty degrees, scope of people that are involved in, in these rehab decision, seeing what if kind of the Philip how to be in the orthopedic surgeons are kind of the overall directors, they’re the ones that are delivering the protocols for their patients. And, you know, saying this is what should be done. You know, we should see what they think about package patterns TT’s, or the one we’re in the trenches were the ones that actually were applying testing. But we feel should be best. You know what is what the P T say we wanted to kind of see what are both sides would say. And then maybe the compare contrast and draw conclusions from that. Unlike the more like a time line and being able to see again, what’s, what’s best practice. That’s great. But what’s actually being done on both ends in terms of the orthopedic surgeons and then the follow through with the, the physical therapists after? The surgery. So, so how’d you guys approach it and, and what you guys fine. Let’s get into the nitty gritty yet for one of the biggest things that we found was that there was a large variability, not physical therapist, but also with the orthopedic surgeon, and I think it really probably under floors, or underestimates, the ability out there, because the sample that we took from was the sports section with exception in private practice section, or what formerly known as those sections, I should say with their new name changes. But it’s a pretty, if you think about it a homogeneous sample of people, you would think that would be in the know of the current landscape of the literature, who would probably under floors, or under made the, the true, very villi out there similarly that we, we found even more variety in the orthopedic population, certain population, and that was the sample of pediatric orthopedic surgeon from the research and sports medicine group prison. Group, once again, a very homogeneous sample that tends to be a little bit more up to date with their with their current recommendation. So we, we were, we were quite quick deprived prize, the degree of Billy that we found, so, so I just want to stop you there to make sure I understand what you’re saying, and make sure the audience gets it too.

10:04 – 15:09

So you’re saying this groups free homogeneous you figured it, would they be more well informed because these are the people who go out of their way to not only be members but to be section or academy members and seek out the research, so they should have been sticking to or at least be closer to the best practice guidelines that have been put forth so far. But you saw variability, which you’re saying really really, really highlights how much variability was out there that you couldn’t even reach at xactly yet. Okay. I just didn’t wanna make sure I, I want to make sure I understood that. So it’s okay that is that is pretty telling what were some of the results you want to get into some of the some of the highlights. And some of the things that you guys found that maybe surprise you or didn’t surprise you. If you think about the decision. Making profits or what you’re the tools. You’re using from, from time based parameters to some type of strength criteria to some type of stumps performance measure to maybe some type of patient outcome measure or psychological attachment or contract dry. I mean, the variation existed across all of those, but even some of the more kind of would you consider maybe more concrete things like time we’re not even agreeing on time when the progress patience right now and you think that there’s probably the better most amount of research looking to support like those simple those, those type of concrete things. But we can’t even agree. And then when you start drilling down into the details about well, are reassessing strength and a lot of everybody agreed like. Yeah. Strength is important. But then we asked, how are you assessing strength that then variability just started from there? Right. And some people there was a large proportion of the sample PT’s that, you know, just relied on manual muscle testing to progress their patients and kind of what the literature showing is that, you know, we’re not going to be able to. Identify these higher levels of gases. Pete that may exist for these patients, when they’re strong but they’re just not strong enough using now montage, tonight’s lesion. But then when people are using either more objective measures, like handle their no mama tree. Or there’s availability rice the testing the standard that which they’re holding them to the variability just continues to progress where some people required seventy five percent. Maybe limbs imaging index and some people were maybe above one hundred percent. It’s there’s just, you know, the organizer surprised they as we drill down. You know, the win the details of what we’re doing and everyday practice, we can agree on broad strokes. We can agree that strengthening important, the man when you start like measuring strength like how you’re actually applying and doing that. That’s really different from everybody. Do you see in the framework is there? But how you actually apply and actually measure things like time or strength, which everyone pretty much agrees on being important factors to take into consideration when you start. Looking even smaller there. That’s where you see even more the very variability come into play. Yeah. Yeah. Eric, what do you want more like the devil? That was in the house a little bit like he talked to finishing tonight and nobody’s gonna argue that strength that meet strength. This is not going to be important. But I think once you start to, to hammer down on to power, they testing or something the strength of, of, of their patients. Are you really comparing apples to apples when when you start to go across different clinics, clinician and patients? And I think it really does create a little bit confusion, not just in the PT population in the clinic population. But Auckland patients to talk with one another, when they’re like, oh, yeah. I think cleared how they took your or yeah, they, they hooked me up to this machine four times. And, and I have to get at least ninety cent and the other person’s like oh, I’ve never done that before. And they’re back on the field plan already. I think it really does create a little bit of confusion within the society as well as are we really treating the same patients across different clinicians in clinic. And practitioners in the same profession. You know, right. That’s and that’s a great example of when you get to patients together, and they say, oh, we have the same injury, we must have done the same type of rehab, or at least hit these big big benchmarks. And when they’re different that’s confusing. And again, I get it, you know, patients are different from patient to patient. But if this is what best practices are, how come there’s so much variability? What were you able to hone in and either measure and ask, or at least if not speculate? Why is it? Why, why do we take it upon ourselves to, to have so much variability within the PT arm of the survey that we thought he’d be able to get one of those details? We, we tried to look at commision doctor that maybe influenced some of their him their decision that the us. So we had we kind of broke people down into, like either, high volume or low volume practitioners, where we said, anybody that treated more than ten miles per year. We accounted for them at high volume. Actitities and those less than that were low volume. We looked at certified specialists versus not certified specialists. And we don’t think years of clinical experience, and you know, if we if we use, we don’t know what that program is or, you know, like like you said, a few times we have our current, you know, Beth standard that we have our practice standard.

15:09 – 20:08

But we know if those are ideal hopefully change as we continue to learn more. But if we lived up to characteristics of the clinicians relative to the decision, they were making it seem like certified specialists were more likely to follow either which beat, of course, board certified specialists more likely to follow those kind of current practice guideline, and also those clinicians that were that were into our high volume clinicians seem to kind of follow more those best practice standards. So jor Beth is kind of what we’ve only result is that meeting. Those conditions are maybe more tied into the current literature or maybe by into the current literature more maybe see the investment in their practice going out. Of the way there, that’s a self selected group, which we started talking about the top of the show. These are people who say when your SAS, or when you’re seeing high volume, I’m I better, I better be doing the best because I’m practices wise because I’m seeing so many of these types of patients, these specific type of patients each and every year variability in terms of testing, I could imagine sometimes would have to do with ability of Quebec. Right. Each practice setting is going to be different. Yeah, definitely. And I think Becky him about a up in some of our speculation that people that had can be high volume a, you know, probably see the investment in an economic Donna, Mamata, or even like a handheld on a monitor roof with someone who may maybe in a facility where they’re not being as many of those types of patients may not be willing to invest in something because there’s no cost benefit for them or return on their investment in the long term. And obviously, there are other financial issues that you come across. Basis issues potentially. So I think there’s a lot of confounding issues that could arrive that can reason why someone is not using this type of instrumentation where can work in the audience, find this and, and download and kind of consumer themselves want to make sure they get access to it. Yes. The PTA survey published in jail at BT in October issue. Twenty eighteen and me surge in order big surgeon arm of the study was just published last month on in the orthopedic journalist sports medicine, Zingo them, and you can download that, that’s a full tech there, you can download full text there. No problem. What, what was the what was some of the attitudes of people who participated in this after the, the results will reveal work were they shocked were they surprised to were they, you know, pledging to, to change their practice because they saw such variability or anything come out of that, you know, I don’t think it was that surprising. I think I think disturbing survey kinda showed what everybody coming, Verdy thought. Victor knew existed that there’s variation out there and everyone’s like, wow, I, I knew it was variable. But I didn’t think it was very -able. You know what I think that was kind of, like just reinforced them the some of the thoughts, we did get a couple of emails from people like saying, hey, this is this is really nice really enjoyed remiss kinda good study, but I don’t know air and different Binyamin that no you know what it was interesting. I think you’ve gotta lar- a lot of publicity on social media platforms almost like the like a shock value of you need to do better. You know, by no means do I think you are. Is it is it bulletproof is it the best thing out there? Is it catching all people who may be at risk? But, but at least it’s the best we have at this point. But it seems if people aren’t even doing that at this point. So how could we really say that it’s not doing what it claims to be doing? If people aren’t there aren’t really doing it. So I think it, it really gained some headway on, on the media platform of saying, hey guys, let’s do a little bit better out there. I like that good. Take a quick break want to thank our sponsors are east medical staffing for keeping the show on the air. They find jobs, whether you’re gonna do so Adelphia or Long Island or anywhere you want to do a beach a lake. He wanna go mountains. He want to ski you can do that. That’s the cool part of variability in our in our profession is people need PT all over. So go do what you want where you want to do it. And Arias get you set up a U, R, E US, medical dot com. Not only just having the positions. But as well as being with a walkie through all the pain points. What do I do if I’m licensed in New York? But I want to go work in California for a couple of months they’ve got people on board to help you walk you through that. So you’re not on your own housing. How do you find where to live and is the person that use hiring you? They pay for that. They’ve got someone to walk you through that as well. The thing that could knit freaked me out the most was taxes. If you live in New York, but you’re temporarily working in Colorado. What do you do again? Arias has someone for that as well. So check them out, if you want to do a short term placement or look into relocate long-term, a U, R, E US medical dot com. Where, where would you guys go if you could go anywhere in the fifty states, if you do exactly what you wanna do what state, haven’t you been to that? You would give shot for thirteen weeks.

20:09 – 25:05

What bait haven’t I been to? Well, I was thinking more of that. I have been to Florida gator, we go down to Pensacola Beach, Florida every odd year for a week, and that is one of my favorite places in the United States. But opera played the haven’t been to having not ally. They had not been there, I would probably pick some somewhere in the mountain bikers aggo could Pacific northwest. Well at school party where the fifty states check him out. You are US medical dot com. Extent stay tuned. The we’ll be right back to the P T on cast. If you look at for education passed your physical therapy degree, look no further than Brooks. H L, Brooks rehabilitation institute of higher learning you could find out more Brooks, I h l dot org continuing education along with residencies and fellowships residencies in Orthopaedics, geriatrics, women’s health, neurologic PT, pediatrics, sports, and fellowship opportunity as well. So look into it if you’re looking to expand your knowledge base Brooks, IHL dot org to the typecast with Jimmy MacKay question. How was the how are the views or how was the reaction you guys mentioned, some kind of shock value on on social media saying, hey, come almost a rallying cry. But we, we need to do better. Let’s do better. Was there any reaction from the orthopedic surgeons since they’re the kind of the first touch point in the patient, and then they pass them off to us betcha they expect us to be doing best practices? What was their reaction to the results? I haven’t seen much reaction to the there’s a lot more talk about it and probably considerable Eric. And I of fly in within the realm when we did present it that at conference. We got a lot of really good feedback. We actually won best paper award at the prison conference the year, we did present this at that conference. I think there was there was a lot of kind of good Baillieu in, in the in the paper and the topics. And you know, we’re hoping that maybe it’s going to help drive Johnston change where beating side and change things around to so, so, so alternately. I guess the question to ask, is how do we do better? You know, we have these academies, now we specialize, we have best practices is there anything that you would that you, if you could make may wave. Magic wand that you put into play. How can we do better? I did a residency at the. I did a residency at the at the university of Delaware did for threatens there under the guidance of insider macadear who’s been acute advocate for the tests. You know, you need to test the folk and there’s been research out there that said, don’t, don’t need an kind of garner monitor to assess quad strikes you all you need is in the extension, machine that every clinic was throwing out a few years back and now the starting to get them out of the trash. So I think it comes down to, you know what take the time out. It’s worth your while for the information that you get just to do repetition, maximum testing if that’s all you have is you have a handheld item ometer, you use both types of testing, but I think it’s taking the time out and maybe sacrificing other parts of your of your treatment to really get the data that you need to make educated decisions. And that’s a valuable thing, right? Giving up some time. But if if, if what you’re presenting his is correct, which we, we would assume that would be since its best practices that time is well, spent, we’ll we’re going to say sorry to cut you off yet. I agree. I think engage in this conversation is actually helpful in getting some of the some of that social media. No on your your, your show. You’ve talked about kind of lag time between evidence to trickle down everyday practice. And I think that the social media conversations really helpful with and they can push us that people probably wouldn’t have picked up the paper or read it beforehand. And there’s there’s so much stuff about about ACL coming out. I mean I mean hundreds of papers every year to try and I get that. But I think trying to just these maybe maybe helped reinforce some of this, you know, the current standard that we think are the best to try to help, you know, get that out to general practitioners that don’t specialize an easy else, but probably Seeven majority of easy L patients because they make up the majority of the general practices that are out there, and maybe helping to adopt you know, the doctor and the guidelines that are that are being put forward. We’ll look at Alex, look the positive at least there are best practices, right? And we’re pushing we’re pushing up professor. Towards finding out what is best that’s great. That’s a great problem to have is. How do we know? How are we going to disseminate that and make sure it gets put into play? At least we got that first part least, we’re really, really paying attention to the first part. Now, if we as you just mentioned, continue to have those conversations, maybe hopefully it’ll help that second part with this emanation last thing. I wanted to ask Eric, you’ve got a unique situation in terms of, of working with students any strategies to encourage students and new clinicians to adopting best practices, and making the change in current practice patterns, to hopefully as they progress in their careers continue that and then teach other students to change the profession.

25:05 – 30:18

Yeah. You know, I had as a an instructor in professor at this point, I tend to utilize a lot of media and podcasts, some of your own actually and other types of logs and things like that after screen through them with my Hyun because I feel like it’s very powerful to hear it from the door at both. So more. Digestible for them than reading the text books. Hearing me talk about it up there. So I utilize that empowers them to get engaged in conversation with the people who are actually putting out literature, and the people who do have experience aside from hearing it from myself as a sage on the stage. I also my mantra to the students are you know they need to be the change in practice. They need to be that, that, that catalyst in the clinic, don’t go into finicky the things that the clinic is doing if they’re things that you don’t necessarily jive with he that change. Bring the new culture two who’ve been out there who, who may not know what, what is new in the research realm. So I, I really encountered them to be that catalyst that change of the profession, taking it from out of the academic side of things into clinical practice love it. Be the change. Right. It’s not gonna change unless you take what you exactly what it is take what you learn in school, and your clinical rotations and actually, start to do it love that last. Part of the show is the parting shot. It is the parting shot. The Portland shot is brought to you by rock tape more than just the tape company. Rock tape is a movement company, tools and education for medical professionals, if you look at it help, your patients, go stronger longer. Checkout rock tape dot com. You guys have an opportunity to leave one one sentiment with the audience before you go who wants to go first with their partying shop Erica, you kick it off that. All right. So, I guess my parting dot would probably be addictive. Festive, we could do with younger. Patients is its neck with them understand that they’re not an eight the pair, their person who had an affair, and in dealing with kids and dealing with adults. You know you need to manage each person’s differently by using the evidence as your guide, but understanding that you need to tell about intimate independence to the person. And if you could just connect with that person, you’re, you’re, you’re gonna make that person better, regardless of, of. What you do as long as you’re you’re, you’re letting Evan guide you love at Elliot. You’re up and parting shot when he got I think just making sure you continue to grow as a clinician, you know, I think seeing a lot of as the ovation in unfortunately thing, a lot of them hail or have re injury or or secondary injury has has driven me to want to get better. You know. And I think just kind of continuing to grow as condition, and, and, and use those, those events or in that let learning to, to better yourself for the next person around is, is an important thing love that before we go. I’m just you. You’re prescribing podcast episodes, as homework or is outside learning to students love to hear that. I am. I and actually I get made fun of by my other faculty members because of it. But obviously, I listen to a lot of them my forehand. I don’t just give it to them, but I feel like it’s a lot more digestible for them. They can do it while they’re driving into school. They could do it while they’re working out. So. They can work it into their, their everyday life. And it also brings them. They stumble upon other things within that podcast. And it’s more student directed learning after that because they’re like, oh, I listen to this on certain podcast. And then I saw another episode that I was in it really interests me. So it starts to get them on that self directed learning which which is so important for when they do graduate is, how do they, you know, now the information coming to them, they have to go out and seek it? So it teaches them that new skill. You know, selfishly a love to hear that because I host a couple of different podcasts. But I like it because as the as the guy with a degree in communications you’re talking or you’re trying to facilitate a conversation, the way your audience listens. And you’re listening the way your audience talks, and that’s a way to facilitate great conversation instead of what you mentioned earlier being the sage on the stage. That’s a presentation. Right. Some people do learn really well from presentation myself, I’m a conversation guy, obviously. So, you know, selfishly hey, love love to hear that. You’re prescribing assigning podcast episodes, maybe one or two for my show to students, but just love the fact that you’re open to and Anna do want to highlight you mentioned it twice that you do screen through that. Anybody with a microphone create a podcast super easy. But I love the fact that you’re screening it and highlighting. Hey, pay attention to this, and they do after that, if they trip across an episode that hasn’t been screened they need to take that upon themselves because there’s a lot of information in less than great information out there to. Absolutely. I think that’s the most important thing. Is that you’re, you’re, you’re really screening through it to make sure because there’s a lot of stuff out there, that, that maybe you doesn’t really job with the intentions of, of what you want them to get to learn and last point, I’ll make love that too, because once they graduate, they don’t have a professor down the hall or they aren’t running into someone each and every week.

30:19 – 32:32

We’re having that information brought to them, they need to start to seek it out. And think, you know, handing over day of a blog to read or. Podcast, listen to or video channel follow. That’s a great digestible way as we mentioned before, of getting information. Once you start working forty hours a week when you graduate gentlemen, want to say thanks very much for your time. Don’t think it will be the last one. We have you guys on the show, but etc. Service episode with everybody. On the P T cast is a product of p t pint cast LLC it is hosted and produced by p t podcasts. EEO Jim McKay, and CBO sky, Donovan from Marymount university, we talk PT, drink, beer, and record it this has been another poor from the PT pint cast the PD podcasts in ten for educational purposes. Only no clinical decision making should be based solely on one source while Perez, taken to ensure accuracy, factual errors can be present. More on the show at PT podcasts dot com. We’re home on the internet t-, pine cast dot com created by build PT. Build PT provides marketing services, specifically for private practice, PT’s website, development and hosted inviting content marketing solutions PT clinics across the country. See with good PT can do for you. Today dot com. The PT pint cast proudly supports the Travis mills foundation on April tenth twenty twelve United States army staff sergeant Travis mills of the eighty second airborne was critically injured on his third tour of duty in Afghanistan by while on patrol losing portions of both legs, and both arms. He is one of only five quadruple amputees from the wars in Iraq, and Afghanistan to survive his injuries, thanks to his amazing strength, courage, and incredible will to live the heroic actions of the men in his unit. The prayers of thousands and all the healthcare providers at the Walter Reed Army medical center. Travis remains on the road to recovery. He founded the Travis mills foundation, a nonprofit organization formed to benefit and assist. Combat injured. Teran’s. Travis lives by his motto never give up. Never quit to support the Travis mills foundation. Or to find out more visit Travis mills dot org.

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ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes with Eric & Elliot Greenburg We talk with Eric & Elliot Greenburg (no relation) about ACL injury & repeat injury in youth athletes.<br /> <br /> Topics hit:<br /> <br /> High rates of ACL injury and repeat injury among youth/adolescent athletes.<br /> <br /> Recent publications of ours that identifying variability of rehabilitation methods in determination of progression of activity following ACL reconstruction among physical therapists and orthopedic surgeons<br /> <br /> Controversy regarding what criteria "should" be used to help determine rehab progression, including return to sports among this population. Translating evidence into practice, which is not occurring according to our survey results. <br /> <br /> How can we optimize rehabilitation in a world of managed care, escalating copays and high deductible insurance plans. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 32:32
The Great Now What?! With Maggie Whittum: Stroke Survivor https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/03/11/the-great-now-what-with-maggie-whittum-stroke-survivor/ Mon, 11 Mar 2019 23:08:59 +0000 https://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5371 The Great Now What?! With Maggie Whittum: Stroke Survivor Maggie Whittum is re-emerging into life as an artist, after having suffered a massive stroke in December 2014 at age 33. She performs with Phamaly Theatre Company in Denver, which exclusively casts actors with disabilities. Previous theatre directing and producing credits include All in the Timing, The Zoo Story, Into the Woods and The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee. She has directed and performed in Scotland, Colorado, South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Beijing and throughout Canada. She also assistant directed under Tony award-winner Rebecca Taichman at McCarter Theatre in Princeton, NJ, where she was named the Charles Evans Fellow (2012). Commercial acting credits include MapQuest, Samsung and Starz/Encore. Maggie is a graduate of Colorado College. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 17:24 Ethical Practice, Classroom to Clinic & Finding your own Career Path LIVE from Quinnipiac https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/03/04/ethical-practice-classroom-to-clinic-finding-your-own-career-path-live-from-quinnipiac-ethical-practice-classroom-clinic-finding-career-path-live-quinnipiac/ Mon, 04 Mar 2019 10:00:26 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5156 Excited to be invited to Quinnipiac university to talk with faculty, Chair Katherine Harris, Professors Duane Scotti and Jay Meyerson and second year student Courtney Kent. We talked ethical practice, how to bring knowledge from class room to clinic and how to make your own career path. Then we went and hand a bunch of beers. Excited to be invited to Quinnipiac university to talk with faculty, Chair Katherine Harris, Professors Duane Scotti and Jay Meyerson and second year student Courtney Kent. We talked ethical practice, how to bring knowledge from class room to clinic and how to make your own career path.

Then we went and hand a bunch of beers.

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Ethical Practice, Classroom to Clinic & Finding your own Career Path LIVE from Quinnipiac We wen Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 56:03
Coast to Coast #RideForParalysis w Janne Kouri https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/02/27/362-coast-to-coast-rideforparalysis-w-janne-kouri/ Wed, 27 Feb 2019 10:00:37 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5217 We last caught up with Janne on episode 270 (link below). This time... he's going to do something even bigger than opening facilities across the country (and now around the world!) for those 6 million Americans living with paralysis. Wait until you hear what he's doing now! Follow his journey and help him reach his fundraising goal here: https://www.nextstepfitness.org/ On Twitter here: @NextStepLA https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/07/03/207-janne-kouri-whats-next-step-after-spinal-cord-injury/ We last caught up with Janne on episode 270 (link below). This time… he’s going to do something even bigger than opening facilities across the country (and now around the world!) for those 6 million Americans living with paralysis.

Wait until you hear what he’s doing now!

Follow his journey and help him reach his fundraising goal here: https://www.nextstepfitness.org/

On Twitter here: @NextStepLA

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/07/03/207-janne-kouri-whats-next-step-after-spinal-cord-injury/
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Coast to Coast #RideForParalysis w Janne Kouri We last caught up with Janne on episode 270 (link below). This time... he's going to do something even bigger than opening facilities across the country (and now around the world!) for those 6 million Americans living with paralysis.



Wait until you hear what he's doing now!



Follow his journey and help him reach his fundraising goal here: https://www.nextstepfitness.org/



On Twitter here: @NextStepLA




https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/07/03/207-janne-kouri-whats-next-step-after-spinal-cord-injury/

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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 19:35
A PT + A Contractor, making spaces accessible for all. https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/02/25/361-pt-contractor-making-spaces-accessible/ Mon, 25 Feb 2019 10:00:26 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5145 Katherine Franklin didn't have to look far for a partner to help people create accessible homes and businesses, she paired up with her husband Stevo. Katherine is a Certified Aging-in-Place Specialist through the National Association of Home Builders. One of Katie's greatest joys is helping her patients regain their independence after life's curve balls. Stevo brings a wealth of insight as a general contractor in the areas of new home construction, renovations, additions, and commercial design. Their company, La Fe Consulting, works in the San Antonio area right now. Katherine Franklin didn’t have to look far for a partner to help people create accessible homes and businesses, she paired up with her husband Stevo. Katherine is a Certified Aging-in-Place Specialist through the National Association of Home Builders. One of Katie’s greatest joys is helping her patients regain their independence after life’s curve balls. Stevo brings a wealth of insight as a general contractor in the areas of new home construction, renovations, additions, and commercial design. Their company, La Fe Consulting, works in the San Antonio area right now.

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A PT + A Contractor, making spaces accessible for all. Katherine Franklin didn't have to look far for a partner to help people create accessible homes and businesses, she paired up with her husband Stevo. Katherine is a Certified Aging-in-Place Specialist through the National Association of Home Builders. One of Katie's greatest joys is helping her patients regain their independence after life's curve balls. Stevo brings a wealth of insight as a general contractor in the areas of new home construction, renovations, additions, and commercial design. Their company, La Fe Consulting, works in the San Antonio area right now.  Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 24:36
A PT, OT and Exercise Scientist walk into a case study LIVE from Sacred Heart https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/02/18/360-pt-ot-exercise-scientist-walk-case-study-live-sacred-heart/ Mon, 18 Feb 2019 10:00:18 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5142 What would happen if a PT and OT and an Exercise Scientist all broke down the came case report?  Well wonder no more!  We went live at Sacred Heart's Physical Therapy program with PT Paul Ullucci, OT Sharon McCloskey, and Exercise Scientists Chris Tabor to break down two case report from all three professional angles. Then we went out and had beers. Special thanks to Chris Petrosino   What would happen if a PT and OT and an Exercise Scientist all broke down the came case report?  Well wonder no more!  We went live at Sacred Heart’s Physical Therapy program with PT Paul Ullucci, OT Sharon McCloskey, and Exercise Scientists Chris Tabor to break down two case report from all three professional angles. Then we went out and had beers.

Special thanks to Chris Petrosino

 

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A PT, OT and Exercise Scientist walk into a case study LIVE from Sacred Heart What would happen if a PT and OT and an Exercise Scientist all broke down the came case report?  Well wonder no more!  We went live at Sacred Heart's Physical Therapy program with PT Paul Ullucci, OT Sharon McCloskey, and Exercise Scientists Chris Tabor to break down two case report from all three professional angles. Then we went out and had beers.<br /> <br /> Special thanks to Chris Petrosino <br /> <br /> Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 48:20
UFC Physical Therapist Heather Linden https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/02/13/359-ufc-physical-therapist-heather-linden/ Wed, 13 Feb 2019 10:00:02 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5139 We talked with Heather Linden the Physical Therapist for the Ultimate Fighting Championship. We talked about how her role was created and what it entails with these ultimate combat athletes. Jimmy needed to ask her what it's like to watch two of her patients hurt each other in the octagon and then be friends right after the bout is over. We talked with Heather Linden the Physical Therapist for the Ultimate Fighting Championship. We talked about how her role was created and what it entails with these ultimate combat athletes. Jimmy needed to ask her what it’s like to watch two of her patients hurt each other in the octagon and then be friends right after the bout is over.

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UFC Physical Therapist Heather Linden We talked with Heather Linden who's a Physical Therapist for the Ultimate Fighting Championship. We talked about how her role was created and what it entails with these ultimate combat athletes. Jimmy needed to ask her what it's like to watch two of her patients hurt each other in the octagon and then be friends right after the bout is over. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 33:15
The YELP for mobility – Access.Earth App with Matt McCann https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/02/06/yelp-mobility-access-earth-app-matt-mccann/ Wed, 06 Feb 2019 10:18:23 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5135 We talked with Matt McCann who developed Access.Earth, an app that lets users help map the world of mobility.  Users rate businesses, restaurants, hotels, anywhere someone with a mobility issue might go. But now this app let's them know ahead of time what they can expect. Is there a ramp? Stairs they can't navigate? Doors not wide enough? Access.Earth is going to chart the unknown. We talked with Matt McCann who developed Access.Earth, an app that lets users help map the world of mobility.  Users rate businesses, restaurants, hotels, anywhere someone with a mobility issue might go. But now this app let’s them know ahead of time what they can expect. Is there a ramp? Stairs they can’t navigate? Doors not wide enough? Access.Earth is going to chart the unknown.

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The YELP for mobility - Access.Earth App with Matt McCann We talked with Matt McCann who developed Access.Earth, an app that lets users help map the world of mobility.  Users rate businesses, restaurants, hotels, anywhere someone with a mobility issue might go. But now this app let's them know ahead of time what they can expect. Is there a ramp? Stairs they can't navigate? Doors not wide enough? Access.Earth is going to chart the unknown. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 15:44
#VitalsAreVital Heart Month with Cardio Pulmonary PT Ellen Hillegass https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/01/29/358-vitalsarevital-heart-month-cardio-pulmonary-pt-ellen-hillegass/ Tue, 29 Jan 2019 10:00:34 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5116 We kick off heart month with Ellen Hillegass a specialist in Cardio Pulmonary Physical Therapy. Ellen gives you the why and the what to do with your patients that you might be overlooking regarding their cardiac function.   Ellen Hillegass, EdD, PT, CCS, FAACVPR, FAPTA,is an experienced educator and clinician, and a dynamic teacher. She is an adjunct associate professor in the DPT program at Mercer University, Western Carolina University, and Touro University. Dr. Hillegass serves as president of Cardiopulmonary Specialists and is an instructor of continuing education programs across the country. She draws upon her expertise as a board-certified cardiovascular and pulmonary clinical specialist to create a clinically relevant classroom experience for her students. Dr. Hillegass is a Fellow of the APTA and has been active in the Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Section for many years as VP and Payment and Policy Chair. She has also been active and is a Fellow of the American Association of Cardiac and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR). She is editor of Essentials in Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy, an entry-level text with the third edition published in 2010, and working on the fourth edition for 2014. She is the author of a clinical notes book titled PT Clinical NOTes. Ellen holds a Masters of medical science in cardiopulmonary physiology from Emory University and a doctorate in exercise physiology from the University of Georgia. She received entry-level training in physical therapy from the University of Pennsylvania.   We kick off heart month with Ellen Hillegass a specialist in Cardio Pulmonary Physical Therapy. Ellen gives you the why and the what to do with your patients that you might be overlooking regarding their cardiac function.

 

Ellen Hillegass, EdD, PT, CCS, FAACVPR, FAPTA,is an experienced educator and clinician, and a dynamic teacher. She is an adjunct associate professor in the DPT program at Mercer University, Western Carolina University, and Touro University. Dr. Hillegass serves as president of Cardiopulmonary Specialists and is an instructor of continuing education programs across the country. She draws upon her expertise as a board-certified cardiovascular and pulmonary clinical specialist to create a clinically relevant classroom experience for her students. Dr. Hillegass is a Fellow of the APTA and has been active in the Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Section for many years as VP and Payment and Policy Chair. She has also been active and is a Fellow of the American Association of Cardiac and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR). She is editor of Essentials in Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy, an entry-level text with the third edition published in 2010, and working on the fourth edition for 2014. She is the author of a clinical notes book titled PT Clinical NOTes. Ellen holds a Masters of medical science in cardiopulmonary physiology from Emory University and a doctorate in exercise physiology from the University of Georgia. She received entry-level training in physical therapy from the University of Pennsylvania.

 

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#VitalsAreVital Heart Month with Cardio Pulmonary PT Ellen Hillegass We kick off heart month with Ellen Hillegass a specialist in Cardio Pulmonary Physical Therapy. Ellen gives you the why and the what to do with your patients that you might be overlooking regarding their cardiac function.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Ellen Hillegass, EdD, PT, CCS, FAACVPR, FAPTA,is an experienced educator and clinician, and a dynamic teacher. She is an adjunct associate professor in the DPT program at Mercer University, Western Carolina University, and Touro University. Dr. Hillegass serves as president of Cardiopulmonary Specialists and is an instructor of continuing education programs across the country. She draws upon her expertise as a board-certified cardiovascular and pulmonary clinical specialist to create a clinically relevant classroom experience for her students. Dr. Hillegass is a Fellow of the APTA and has been active in the Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Section for many years as VP and Payment and Policy Chair. She has also been active and is a Fellow of the American Association of Cardiac and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR). She is editor of Essentials in Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy, an entry-level text with the third edition published in 2010, and working on the fourth edition for 2014. She is the author of a clinical notes book titled PT Clinical NOTes. Ellen holds a Masters of medical science in cardiopulmonary physiology from Emory University and a doctorate in exercise physiology from the University of Georgia. She received entry-level training in physical therapy from the University of Pennsylvania.<br /> <br /> Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 22:10
Which way’s the wind blowing? PT + Climate Change?! https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/01/22/355-ways-wind-blowing-pt-climate-change/ Tue, 22 Jan 2019 10:05:56 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5060 Rose Pignataro presented at the APTA's NEXT conference in 2018 on where Physical Therapy can effect climate change... we didn't understand how, so instead of reading about it, we just went and made her explain it to us. She brought some friends to help too. When it was over it made sense to us. From her presentation @ NEXT: "It can be argued that climate change is currently the biggest threat to global health. As physical therapists and physical therapist assistants, it is important for us to recognize the repercussions of global warming on the incidence and severity of disease and disability as a component of health promotion, wellness, and rehabilitative outcomes. Although it is not currently common practice, PTs and PTAs have numerous opportunities to play a crucial role in environmental sustainability. This session will explore the value of our professional knowledge and skill in health assessment and advocacy; plans of care relative to environmental exposure; and the influence of our physical surroundings on health behavior choices such as physical activity, proper nutrition, and stress management. Factors to consider include the impact of anthropogenic causes of climate change, ultimately affecting air and water quality; availability of healthy food, exposure to extreme weather hazards; and the influence of temperature on bacteria, fungi, and other infectious agents. The speakers will discuss an environmental framework that stresses the interdependence between personal and ecological well-being. This is consistent with the expectation that PTs and PTAs pursue interventions that treat communities as well as individuals, investing in population-level changes that advance public health." Rose Pignataro presented at the APTA’s NEXT conference in 2018 on where Physical Therapy can effect climate change… we didn’t understand how, so instead of reading about it, we just went and made her explain it to us. She brought some friends to help too.

When it was over it made sense to us.

From her presentation @ NEXT:

“It can be argued that climate change is currently the biggest threat to global health. As physical therapists and physical therapist assistants, it is important for us to recognize the repercussions of global warming on the incidence and severity of disease and disability as a component of health promotion, wellness, and rehabilitative outcomes. Although it is not currently common practice, PTs and PTAs have numerous opportunities to play a crucial role in environmental sustainability. This session will explore the value of our professional knowledge and skill in health assessment and advocacy; plans of care relative to environmental exposure; and the influence of our physical surroundings on health behavior choices such as physical activity, proper nutrition, and stress management. Factors to consider include the impact of anthropogenic causes of climate change, ultimately affecting air and water quality; availability of healthy food, exposure to extreme weather hazards; and the influence of temperature on bacteria, fungi, and other infectious agents. The speakers will discuss an environmental framework that stresses the interdependence between personal and ecological well-being. This is consistent with the expectation that PTs and PTAs pursue interventions that treat communities as well as individuals, investing in population-level changes that advance public health.”

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Which way's the wind blowing? PT + Climate Change?! Rose Pignataro presented at the APTA's NEXT conference in 2018 on where Physical Therapy can effect climate change... we didn't understand how, so instead of reading about it, we just went and made her explain it to us. She brought some friends to help too.<br /> <br /> When it was over it made sense to us.<br /> <br /> From her presentation @ NEXT:<br /> <br /> "It can be argued that climate change is currently the biggest threat to global health. As physical therapists and physical therapist assistants, it is important for us to recognize the repercussions of global warming on the incidence and severity of disease and disability as a component of health promotion, wellness, and rehabilitative outcomes. Although it is not currently common practice, PTs and PTAs have numerous opportunities to play a crucial role in environmental sustainability. This session will explore the value of our professional knowledge and skill in health assessment and advocacy; plans of care relative to environmental exposure; and the influence of our physical surroundings on health behavior choices such as physical activity, proper nutrition, and stress management. Factors to consider include the impact of anthropogenic causes of climate change, ultimately affecting air and water quality; availability of healthy food, exposure to extreme weather hazards; and the influence of temperature on bacteria, fungi, and other infectious agents. The speakers will discuss an environmental framework that stresses the interdependence between personal and ecological well-being. This is consistent with the expectation that PTs and PTAs pursue interventions that treat communities as well as individuals, investing in population-level changes that advance public health." Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 35:22
Oncology PT expert Dr. Leslie Waltke from “The Recovery Room” & Beyond https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/01/15/354-oncology-pt-expert-dr-leslie-waltke-recovery-room-beyond/ Tue, 15 Jan 2019 10:05:51 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5058 Dr. Leslie Waltke on the show again who brings a ton of knowledge in the are of Oncology Physical Therapy and the care of patients post-cancer treatment. Cancer survivorship issues are now in the spotlight of research and cancer care. The number of cancer patients and survivors are growing at an astonishing pace. This has only highlighted the still present “cancer rehabilitation gap”: Oncology doctors and nurses don’t know enough about rehabilitation, and rehabilitation therapists don’t know enough about oncology. The result? The very patients that come to us for help, bear the brunt of our unawareness. They suffer more pain, more fatigue, more weakness and more loss than is necessary. With the intent of pushing the quiet cancer rehabilitation evolution into a not so quiet revolution, the Waltke Cancer Rehabilitation was founded in 2016. By adding international collaboration and harnessing the power of social media and online education, the WCRA is driven to pull the worlds of rehabilitation and oncology together. People affected by cancer deserve the finest evidence-based treatment available. Together we have the power to provide it to them. I look forward to the opportunity of working with you to make the world better for people with cancer! Dr. Leslie Waltke on the show again who brings a ton of knowledge in the are of Oncology Physical Therapy and the care of patients post-cancer treatment.

Cancer survivorship issues are now in the spotlight of research and cancer care. The number of cancer patients and survivors are growing at an astonishing pace. This has only highlighted the still present “cancer rehabilitation gap”: Oncology doctors and nurses don’t know enough about rehabilitation, and rehabilitation therapists don’t know enough about oncology. The result? The very patients that come to us for help, bear the brunt of our unawareness. They suffer more pain, more fatigue, more weakness and more loss than is necessary.

With the intent of pushing the quiet cancer rehabilitation evolution into a not so quiet revolution, the Waltke Cancer Rehabilitation was founded in 2016. By adding international collaboration and harnessing the power of social media and online education, the WCRA is driven to pull the worlds of rehabilitation and oncology together.

People affected by cancer deserve the finest evidence-based treatment available. Together we have the power to provide it to them. I look forward to the opportunity of working with you to make the world better for people with cancer!

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Oncology PT expert Dr. Leslie Waltke from "The Recovery Room" & Beyond Dr. Leslie Waltke on the show again who brings a ton of knowledge in the care of patients post-cancer treatment.<br /> <br /> Cancer survivorship issues are now in the spotlight of research and cancer care. The number of cancer patients and survivors are growing at an astonishing pace. This has only highlighted the still present “cancer rehabilitation gap”: Oncology doctors and nurses don’t know enough about rehabilitation, and rehabilitation therapists don’t know enough about oncology. The result? The very patients that come to us for help, bear the brunt of our unawareness. They suffer more pain, more fatigue, more weakness and more loss than is necessary.<br /> <br /> With the intent of pushing the quiet cancer rehabilitation evolution into a not so quiet revolution, the Waltke Cancer Rehabilitation was founded in 2016. By adding international collaboration and harnessing the power of social media and online education, the WCRA is driven to pull the worlds of rehabilitation and oncology together.<br /> <br /> People affected by cancer deserve the finest evidence-based treatment available. Together we have the power to provide it to them. I look forward to the opportunity of working with you to make the world better for people with cancer! Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 32:48
Treating runners of all levels with Chris Johnson’s “Running on Resistance” https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/01/08/352-treating-runners-levels-chris-johnsons-running-resistance/ Tue, 08 Jan 2019 10:15:21 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5052 Treating runners of all levels with Chris Johnson's "Running on Resistance" Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 35:45 The manip that prevents death with Chad Cook https://www.ptpintcast.com/2019/01/02/351-manip-prevents-death-chad-cook/ Wed, 02 Jan 2019 10:00:54 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5048 Chad cook is a professor at Duke University in the Department of Physical Therapy. He's got a session at CSM this year in Washington DC called, "The Dark Side of PubMed: Predatory Journals." Along with Lori Michener, Federico Pozzi and Julie Tilson they will cover the rise and power of predatory journals. He also told the #EPIC story of the creation, submission and publication of a paper on a manip that brought a patient back from the dead, after 5-years. Catch that talk @ CSM, details here: Title: "The Dark Side of PubMed: Predatory Journals." Section: Section on Research Co-Section: Academy of PT Education Session Code: RE-1A-0411 Date: Thursday, January 24, 2019 Time: 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM Location: Walter E. Washington Convention Center Room: 159AB Chad cook is a professor at Duke University in the Department of Physical Therapy.

He’s got a session at CSM this year in Washington DC called, “The Dark Side of PubMed: Predatory Journals.”

Along with Lori Michener, Federico Pozzi and Julie Tilson they will cover the rise and power of predatory journals. He also told the #EPIC story of the creation, submission and publication of a paper on a manip that brought a patient back from the dead, after 5-years.

Catch that talk @ CSM, details here:

Title: “The Dark Side of PubMed: Predatory Journals.”
Section: Section on Research
Co-Section: Academy of PT Education
Session Code: RE-1A-0411
Date: Thursday, January 24, 2019
Time: 8:00 AM – 10:00 AM
Location: Walter E. Washington Convention Center
Room: 159AB

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The manip that prevents death with Chad Cook Chad cook is a professor at Duke University in the Department of Physical Therapy.<br /> <br /> He's got a session at CSM this year in Washington DC called, "The Dark Side of PubMed: Predatory Journals."<br /> <br /> Along with Lori Michener, Federico Pozzi and Julie Tilson they will cover the rise and power of predatory journals. He also told the #EPIC story of the creation, submission and publication of a paper on a manip that brought a patient back from the dead, after 5-years.<br /> <br /> Catch that talk @ CSM, details here:<br /> <br /> Title: "The Dark Side of PubMed: Predatory Journals."<br /> Section: Section on Research<br /> Co-Section: Academy of PT Education<br /> Session Code: RE-1A-0411<br /> Date: Thursday, January 24, 2019<br /> Time: 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM <br /> Location: Walter E. Washington Convention Center<br /> Room: 159AB Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 20:20
WTF does MIPS mean to ME? With the APTA’s Heather Smith https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/12/22/351-wtf-mips-mean-heather-smith/ Sat, 22 Dec 2018 15:36:08 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5054 From the APTA's Heather Smith, we break down WTF MIPS is and what it means to YOU. From ATPA.org - "MIPS is the first large-scale value-based payment model that will impact PTs—beginning January 1, 2019, some PTs in private practice are required to participate; others are able to do so by choice. The 3 types of participation are described below. For PTs who are eligible but not required to participate, participation will be a business decision in which they must weigh the benefits of earning incentives with the risk for penalties. APTA has created resources to help PTs navigate this program." Find out more here: http://www.apta.org/MIPS/ From the APTA’s Heather Smith, we break down WTF MIPS is and what it means to YOU.

From ATPA.org – “MIPS is the first large-scale value-based payment model that will impact PTs—beginning January 1, 2019, some PTs in private practice are required to participate; others are able to do so by choice. The 3 types of participation are described below. For PTs who are eligible but not required to participate, participation will be a business decision in which they must weigh the benefits of earning incentives with the risk for penalties. APTA has created resources to help PTs navigate this program.”

Find out more here: http://www.apta.org/MIPS/

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WTF does MIPS mean to ME? With the APTA's Heather Smith From the APTA's Heather Smith, we break down WTF MIPS is and what it means to YOU.<br /> <br /> From ATPA.org - "MIPS is the first large-scale value-based payment model that will impact PTs—beginning January 1, 2019, some PTs in private practice are required to participate; others are able to do so by choice. The 3 types of participation are described below. For PTs who are eligible but not required to participate, participation will be a business decision in which they must weigh the benefits of earning incentives with the risk for penalties. APTA has created resources to help PTs navigate this program."<br /> <br /> Find out more here: http://www.apta.org/MIPS/ Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 17:23
Top 12 of 2018 – Getting the most from working with Tactical Athletes as a PT https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/12/21/top-12-2018-getting-working-tactical-athletes-pt/ Fri, 21 Dec 2018 10:00:07 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5045 Top 12 of 2018 - Getting the most from working with Tactical Athletes as a PT Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 34:26 Top 12 of 2018 – Genomics & Physical Therapy with Mary Elizabeth Parker https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/12/20/top-12-2018-genomics-physical-therapy-mary-elizabeth-parker/ Thu, 20 Dec 2018 10:00:54 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5041 Top 12 of 2018 - Genomics & Physical Therapy with Mary Elizabeth Parker Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 15:15 Top 12 of 2018 – @ThePrehabGuys & @TheMovementMaestro https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/12/19/top-12-2018-theprehabguys-themovementmaestro/ Wed, 19 Dec 2018 10:00:08 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5039 From CSM 2018 in New Orleans, a pair of interviews rolled into 1 episode with @ThePrehabGuys & @TheMovementMaestro From CSM 2018 in New Orleans, a pair of interviews rolled into 1 episode with @ThePrehabGuys & @TheMovementMaestro

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Top 12 of 2018 - @ThePrehabGuys & @TheMovementMaestro From CSM 2018 in New Orleans, a pair of interviews rolled into 1 episode with @ThePrehabGuys & @TheMovementMaestro Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 29:22
Top 12 of 2018 – Kelly Starrett of Mobility WOD https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/12/18/top-12-2018-kelly-starrett-mobility-wod/ Tue, 18 Dec 2018 10:00:26 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5037 Kelly Starrett of Mobility talked with us early in 2018 looking forward to trends in PT and fitness. Kelly Starrett of Mobility talked with us early in 2018 looking forward to trends in PT and fitness.

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Top 12 of 2018 - Kelly Starrett of Mobility WOD Kelly Starrett of Mobility talked with us early in 2018 looking forward to trends in PT and fitness. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 1:04:06
Top 12 of 2018 – Faculty Residency Program w Kyle Covington & CrossFit Twitter War w Julie Wiebe https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/12/17/top-12-2018-faculty-residency-program-w-kyle-covington-crossfit-twitter-war-w-julie-wiebe/ Mon, 17 Dec 2018 10:00:09 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5034 This is 1 episode with two very different conversations. First up is Duke Universities Kyle Covington talking about their innovative faculty residency program. Yes, going to school to become a professor in a PT program, it's a thing! Kyle talks about the why's and how's of the program giving prospective students an idea of what the program is like just in case they might want to apply. Next up is Julie Wiebe who talked about an interaction with @Crossfit on twitter. She was trying to build a bridge between the fitness organization and the PT profession. The interaction started when she reached out to let them know that "PeeRing" or Urine leakage while working out, shouldn't be celebrated. She wanted them to know it was an opportunity for a pelvic floor expert to help those who might leak with exercise. This is 1 episode with two very different conversations.

First up is Duke Universities Kyle Covington talking about their innovative faculty residency program. Yes, going to school to become a professor in a PT program, it’s a thing!

Kyle talks about the why’s and how’s of the program giving prospective students an idea of what the program is like just in case they might want to apply.

Next up is Julie Wiebe who talked about an interaction with @Crossfit on twitter. She was trying to build a bridge between the fitness organization and the PT profession. The interaction started when she reached out to let them know that “PeeRing” or Urine leakage while working out, shouldn’t be celebrated. She wanted them to know it was an opportunity for a pelvic floor expert to help those who might leak with exercise.

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Top 12 of 2018 - Faculty Residency Program w Kyle Covington & CrossFit Twitter War w Julie Wiebe This is 1 episode with two very different conversations.<br /> <br /> First up is Duke Universities Kyle Covington talking about their innovative faculty residency program. Yes, going to school to become a professor in a PT program, it's a thing!<br /> <br /> Kyle talks about the why's and how's of the program giving prospective students an idea of what the program is like just in case they might want to apply.<br /> <br /> Next up is Julie Wiebe who talked about an interaction with @Crossfit on twitter. She was trying to build a bridge between the fitness organization and the PT profession. The interaction started when she reached out to let them know that "PeeRing" or Urine leakage while working out, shouldn't be celebrated. She wanted them to know it was an opportunity for a pelvic floor expert to help those who might leak with exercise. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 31:37
Top 12 of 2018 – PT Entrepreneur Podcast host Danny Matta https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/12/14/top-12-2018-pt-entrepreneur-podcast-host-danny-matta/ Fri, 14 Dec 2018 13:24:57 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5032 Danny Matta is no stranger to the show. We first met when he was the host of the Doc & Jock podcast. Danny is a former military PT who took a chance at leaving that arena and branching out on his own. The owner of multiple cash clinics in the Atlanta area, Danny now shares his insights and strategies on how to make a life out of treating people as a PT, but on your terms. If you're running or even REMOTELY thinking of running a cash-based clinic, you need to binge on Danny's expertise. Danny Matta is no stranger to the show. We first met when he was the host of the Doc & Jock podcast. Danny is a former military PT who took a chance at leaving that arena and branching out on his own. The owner of multiple cash clinics in the Atlanta area, Danny now shares his insights and strategies on how to make a life out of treating people as a PT, but on your terms.

If you’re running or even REMOTELY thinking of running a cash-based clinic, you need to binge on Danny’s expertise.

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Top 12 of 2018 - PT Entrepreneur Podcast host Danny Matta Danny Matta is no stranger to the show. We first met when he was the host of the Doc & Jock podcast. Danny is a former military PT who took a chance at leaving that arena and branching out on his own. The owner of multiple cash clinics in the Atlanta area, Danny now shares his insights and strategies on how to make a life out of treating people as a PT, but on your terms.<br /> <br /> If you're running or even REMOTELY thinking of running a cash-based clinic, you need to binge on Danny's expertise. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 32:35
Top 12 of 2018 – Chad Cook from Duke Univ on Research https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/12/13/top-12-2018-chad-cook-duke-univ-research/ Thu, 13 Dec 2018 10:00:55 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5029 Top 12 of 2018 - Chad Cook from Duke Univ on Research Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 23:14 Top 12 of 2018 – Adam Meakins https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/12/12/top-12-2018-adam-meakins/ Wed, 12 Dec 2018 17:59:50 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5027 We got to have Adam Meakins back on the show to talk about a shoulder course he was touring the US with alongside Erik Meira. We got into some bits about his course and why he doesn't like manual therapy (he does touch human though don't be confused). Adam always brings some great fun, and that's why he wound up again on our top 12 of 2018 shows ranked by # of downloads. We got to have Adam Meakins back on the show to talk about a shoulder course he was touring the US with alongside Erik Meira.

We got into some bits about his course and why he doesn’t like manual therapy (he does touch human though don’t be confused).

Adam always brings some great fun, and that’s why he wound up again on our top 12 of 2018 shows ranked by # of downloads.

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Top 12 of 2018 - Adam Meakins
We got into some bits about his course and why he doesn't like manual therapy (he does touch human though don't be confused).

Adam always brings some great fun, and that's why he wound up again on our top 12 of 2018 shows ranked by # of downloads.]]>
Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 34:33
Top 12 of 2018 – Teddy Willsey – ACL Research Breakdown https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/12/11/top-12-2018-teddy-willsey-acl-research-breakdown/ Tue, 11 Dec 2018 14:03:53 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5025 Top 12 of 2018 - Teddy Willsey - ACL Research Breakdown Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 31:26 Top 12 of 2018 – Salary Negotiations 101 w Sunny from Aureus https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/12/10/top-12-2018-salary-negotiations-101-w-sunny-aureus/ Mon, 10 Dec 2018 15:02:12 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5022 Sunny from Aureus Medical Group gives us the 101 on Salary Negotiations. We don't get a lot of this information in school and it can mostly be an awkward experience to negotiate for money. But, the more prepared you can be, the better and Sunny gets you there. Sunny from Aureus Medical Group gives us the 101 on Salary Negotiations.

We don’t get a lot of this information in school and it can mostly be an awkward experience to negotiate for money. But, the more prepared you can be, the better and Sunny gets you there.

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Top 12 of 2018 - Salary Negotiations 101 w Sunny from Aureus
We don't get a lot of this information in school and it can mostly be an awkward experience to negotiate for money. But, the more prepared you can be, the better and Sunny gets you there.]]>
Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 21:42
Courage under fire. From Air Force CCT to PT school with Zac Rhyner https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/12/06/350-courage-fire-air-force-cct-pt-school-zac-rhyner/ Thu, 06 Dec 2018 15:30:49 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5017 Zac Rhyner was an Air Force CCT when his unit was attacked, Zac put himself in the line of fire. And wound up saving multiple lives. During a 6.5 hour battle, he wound up organizing air strikes close to his location to save his life and the lives of his teammates. He was presented with the Air Force Cross, Bronze Star, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Purple Heart w/ 2 OLC, Joint Service Commendation Medal, Air Force Commendation Medal w/ valor and is now a Pat Tillman Foundation “Tillman Scholar”. We talk about his rehabilitation and physical therapy and how he's doing now. And we look to the future as he applies to PT schools to join the profession. Zac Rhyner was an Air Force CCT when his unit was attacked, Zac put himself in the line of fire. And wound up saving multiple lives. During a 6.5 hour battle, he wound up organizing air strikes close to his location to save his life and the lives of his teammates.

He was presented with the Air Force Cross, Bronze Star, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Purple Heart w/ 2 OLC, Joint Service Commendation Medal, Air Force Commendation Medal w/ valor and is now a Pat Tillman Foundation “Tillman Scholar”.

We talk about his rehabilitation and physical therapy and how he’s doing now.

And we look to the future as he applies to PT schools to join the profession.

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Courage under fire. From Air Force CCT to PT school with Zac Rhyner Zac Rhyner was an Air Force CCT when his unit was attacked, Zac put himself in the line of fire. And wound up saving multiple lives. During a 6.5 hour battle, he wound up organizing air strikes close to his location to save his life and the lives of his teammates.<br /> <br /> He was presented with the Air Force Cross, Bronze Star, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Purple Heart w/ 2 OLC, Joint Service Commendation Medal, Air Force Commendation Medal w/ valor and is now a Pat Tillman Foundation “Tillman Scholar”.<br /> <br /> We talk about his rehabilitation and physical therapy and how he's doing now.<br /> <br /> And we look to the future as he applies to PT schools to join the profession. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 33:09
Need evidence in your life? PEDro is here! Anne Moseley talks about the free database for Physical Therapists https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/11/29/349-need-evidence-life-pedro-anne-moseley-talks-free-database-physical-therapists/ Thu, 29 Nov 2018 17:07:44 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=5001 Need evidence in your life? PEDro is here! Anne Moseley talks about the free database for Physical Therapists Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 21:32 Pediatric casting master Amanda Hall @TheMadCaster https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/11/27/348-pediatric-casting-master-amanda-hall-themadcaster/ Tue, 27 Nov 2018 11:00:07 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4998 Pediatric casting master Amanda Hall @TheMadCaster Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 35:30 Making the jump to private practice ownership w Stacy Menz of Starfish Therapies https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/11/20/347-making-jump-private-practice-ownership-w-stacy-menz-starfish-therapies/ Tue, 20 Nov 2018 11:00:08 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4996 Making the jump to private practice ownership w Stacy Menz of Starfish Therapies Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 25:10 New BJSM strength training research breakdown with Teddy Willsey https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/11/16/346-new-bjsm-strength-training-research-breakdown-teddy-willsey/ Fri, 16 Nov 2018 16:36:47 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4994 New BJSM strength training research breakdown with Teddy Willsey Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 23:45 University of Lynchburg LIVE Part 2 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/11/06/345-university-lynchburg-live-part-2/ Tue, 06 Nov 2018 17:39:17 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4986 University of Lynchburg LIVE Part 2 Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 37:24 University of Lynchburg LIVE – Part 1 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/11/06/344-university-lynchburg-live-part-1/ Tue, 06 Nov 2018 17:36:22 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4984 University of Lynchburg LIVE - Part 1 Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 47:35 NYPTA SSIG Conference LIVE Part 2 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/10/22/343-nypta-ssig-conference-live-part-2/ Mon, 22 Oct 2018 14:39:36 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4952 NYPTA SSIG Conference LIVE Part 2 Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 30:27 NYPTA SSIG Conference LIVE Part 1 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/10/22/342-nypta-ssig-conference-live-part-1/ Mon, 22 Oct 2018 13:00:12 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4950 NYPTA SSIG Conference LIVE Part 1 Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 37:16 Salary Negotiation 101 w Sunny Snook of Aureus https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/10/18/339-salary-negotiation-101-w-sunny-snook-aureus/ Thu, 18 Oct 2018 13:00:39 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4933 Salary Negotiation 101 w Sunny Snook of Aureus Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 21:42 Jay Dicharry PT and Professional Movie Extra https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/10/16/338-jay-dicharry-pt-professional-movie-extra/ Tue, 16 Oct 2018 13:00:43 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4909 Jay Dicharry PT and Professional Movie Extra Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 35:35 Marymount University LIVE! Part 2 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/10/12/339-marymount-university-live-part-2/ Fri, 12 Oct 2018 13:10:15 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4946 Marymount University LIVE! Part 2 Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 35:28 Marymount University LIVE! Part 1 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/10/12/338-marymount-university-live-part-1/ Fri, 12 Oct 2018 13:00:58 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4944 Marymount University LIVE! Part 1 Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 53:01 esports PT with Cait McGee https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/10/11/337-e-sports-video-gaming-pt-cait-mcgee/ Thu, 11 Oct 2018 12:00:00 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4907 esports PT with Cait McGee Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 28:22 Kelly Roseberry from the Travis Mills Foundation https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/10/09/335-kelly-roseberry-travis-mills-foundation/ Tue, 09 Oct 2018 13:00:44 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4899 Kelly McGaughey PT, DPT is the Program Director for the Travis Mills Foundation. She joined the Foundation after spending several years as a full time Physical Therapist and Center Coordinator of Clinical Education at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. She relocated to Maine in the summer of 2017. The Travis Mills Foundation supports post 9/11 recalibrated veterans and their families through long-term programs that help these heroic men and women overcome physical obstacles, strengthen their families, and provide well-deserved rest and relaxation. We support these veterans through our nationally recognized retreat located in the Belgrade Lakes Region of Maine. Veteran families who have been injured in active duty or as a result of their service to our nation receive an all-inclusive, all-expenses paid, barrier-free vacation in Maine where they participate in adaptive activities, bond with other veteran families, and enjoy much-needed rest and relaxation in Maine’s outdoors. In 2017 we hosted 84 veteran families that participated in adaptive sports and activities. Website: https://travismillsfoundation.org/ Kelly McGaughey PT, DPT is the Program Director for the Travis Mills Foundation. She joined the Foundation after spending several years as a full time Physical Therapist and Center Coordinator of Clinical Education at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. She relocated to Maine in the summer of 2017.

The Travis Mills Foundation supports post 9/11 recalibrated veterans and their families through long-term programs that help these heroic men and women overcome physical obstacles, strengthen their families, and provide well-deserved rest and relaxation.

We support these veterans through our nationally recognized retreat located in the Belgrade Lakes Region of Maine. Veteran families who have been injured in active duty or as a result of their service to our nation receive an all-inclusive, all-expenses paid, barrier-free vacation in Maine where they participate in adaptive activities, bond with other veteran families, and enjoy much-needed rest and relaxation in Maine’s outdoors.

In 2017 we hosted 84 veteran families that participated in adaptive sports and activities.

Website: https://travismillsfoundation.org/

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Kelly Roseberry from the Travis Mills Foundation Kelly McGaughey PT, DPT is the Program Director for the Travis Mills Foundation. She joined the Foundation after spending several years as a full time Physical Therapist and Center Coordinator of Clinical Education at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. She relocated to Maine in the summer of 2017.



The Travis Mills Foundation supports post 9/11 recalibrated veterans and their families through long-term programs that help these heroic men and women overcome physical obstacles, strengthen their families, and provide well-deserved rest and relaxation.



We support these veterans through our nationally recognized retreat located in the Belgrade Lakes Region of Maine. Veteran families who have been injured in active duty or as a result of their service to our nation receive an all-inclusive, all-expenses paid, barrier-free vacation in Maine where they participate in adaptive activities, bond with other veteran families, and enjoy much-needed rest and relaxation in Maine’s outdoors.



In 2017 we hosted 84 veteran families that participated in adaptive sports and activities.



Website: https://travismillsfoundation.org/
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 24:27
University of Maryland Eastern Shore LIVE Part 2 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/10/05/337-university-maryland-eastern-shore-live-part-2/ Fri, 05 Oct 2018 13:27:14 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4937 We went LIVE to the University of Maryland Eastern Shore for a live show with faculty, alumni and students. Part 2 features Kevin Levi-Goerlich and Sam Phillips Sam Phillips Sam was born and raised in Chesapeake, Virginia. I played soccer for the majority of my life and collegiately at Longwood University, where I majored in Exercise Science. After graduating from Longwood I worked as a Sports Performance Specialist, with Bon Secours InMotion, for 1 year. I am currently a 3rd year DPT student at UMES and am interested in outpatient orthopedics and pediatric physical therapy. Kevin Levi-Goerlich Kevin graduated from the University of Maryland College Park with a Degree in Kinesiology. While there, he raced competitively for the club triathlon team, including qualifying for and finishing the Ironman World Championship in Kona, Hawaii. He attended and graduated the University of Maryland Eastern Shore where he earned his DPT. While in PT school, his research focused on the use of real-time ultrasound and articular cartilage thickness in the knee. He is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist and a USA Triathlon Level I coach working with athletes of all levels; from youth as young as 7 y/o to elite juniors, and age group athletes. Notable coaching results include the USA Triathlon Junior Elite National title (2018) and a top 15 at the ITU Junior Elite World Championships (2018). We went LIVE to the University of Maryland Eastern Shore for a live show with faculty, alumni and students. Part 2 features Kevin Levi-Goerlich and Sam Phillips

Sam Phillips

Sam was born and raised in Chesapeake, Virginia. I played soccer for the majority of my life and collegiately at Longwood University, where I majored in Exercise Science. After graduating from Longwood I worked as a Sports Performance Specialist, with Bon Secours InMotion, for 1 year. I am currently a 3rd year DPT student at UMES and am interested in outpatient orthopedics and pediatric physical therapy.

Kevin Levi-Goerlich

Kevin graduated from the University of Maryland College Park with a Degree in Kinesiology. While there, he raced competitively for the club triathlon team, including qualifying for and finishing the Ironman World Championship in Kona, Hawaii. He attended and graduated the University of Maryland Eastern Shore where he earned his DPT. While in PT school, his research focused on the use of real-time ultrasound and articular cartilage thickness in the knee. He is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist and a USA Triathlon Level I coach working with athletes of all levels; from youth as young as 7 y/o to elite juniors, and age group athletes. Notable coaching results include the USA Triathlon Junior Elite National title (2018) and a top 15 at the ITU Junior Elite World Championships (2018).

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University of Maryland Eastern Shore LIVE Part 2
Sam Phillips

Sam was born and raised in Chesapeake, Virginia. I played soccer for the majority of my life and collegiately at Longwood University, where I majored in Exercise Science. After graduating from Longwood I worked as a Sports Performance Specialist, with Bon Secours InMotion, for 1 year. I am currently a 3rd year DPT student at UMES and am interested in outpatient orthopedics and pediatric physical therapy.

Kevin Levi-Goerlich
Kevin graduated from the University of Maryland College Park with a Degree in Kinesiology. While there, he raced competitively for the club triathlon team, including qualifying for and finishing the Ironman World Championship in Kona, Hawaii. He attended and graduated the University of Maryland Eastern Shore where he earned his DPT. While in PT school, his research focused on the use of real-time ultrasound and articular cartilage thickness in the knee. He is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist and a USA Triathlon Level I coach working with athletes of all levels; from youth as young as 7 y/o to elite juniors, and age group athletes. Notable coaching results include the USA Triathlon Junior Elite National title (2018) and a top 15 at the ITU Junior Elite World Championships (2018).]]>
Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 40:58
University of Maryland Eastern Shore LIVE Part 1 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/10/05/university-of-maryland-eastern-shore-live-show-part-1-kate-james-sarah-oleksak-and-michael-rabel/ Fri, 05 Oct 2018 13:07:47 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4935 We went LIVE to the University of Maryland Eastern Shore for a live show with faculty, alumni and students. Part 1 features Kate James, Sarah Oleksak, and Michael Rabel Kate James Kate James is a Physical Therapist and Assistant Professor at UMES. Prior to joining the faculty full time in 2016, she worked primarily in the outpatient setting. Her current research interests are working to better understand the relationships between physical characteristics and golf performance in older female golfers and using sRPE to predict injury in runners. She also runs a small, mobile cash-based PT practice, Driven Physiotherapy. Sarah Oleksak Sarah Oleksak a practicing physical therapist of ten years, with over eight of those years, focused in a multidisciplinary pediatric outpatient clinic. She is a Pediatric Certified Specialist with extensive experience treating patients who have a variety of orthopedic and neuromuscular diagnoses from birth to age 18 years. Beyond her primary employment, Dr. Oleksak is active in the community in a variety of ways and strives to represent the benefits of physical therapy for the youngest of patients. She serves on the Program Advisory Committee for the local physical therapist assistant program and she has also provided guest lectures on pediatric patient management for these students. Dr. Oleksak is a Clinic Instructor for physical therapy students completing clinical practicums or full clinical affiliations in the pediatric setting. Recently, she contributed to a soon-to-be-released position statement for the American Academy of Pediatrics on the use of infant carrying devices, alongside world-renowned physicians and researchers. In addition, in 2014, Dr. Oleksak founded and currently serves as the executive director of an international 501c3 non-profit organization that provides ergonomic infant carrying devices to children with disabilities. She is a Certified Babywearing Educator and she is currently developing a pilot study on the use of these infant carrying devices for children with torticollis and plagiocephaly. Michael Rabel Michael Rabel is the Department Chair and Program Director for the Doctor of Physical Therapy program at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore.  He possesses a Master’s degree in Physical Therapy and a Doctor of Science degree with a concentration in biomechanics and manual interventions.  He was a Clinical Program Leader and Outpatient Coordinator at HealthSouth Chesapeake Rehabilitation Hospital and the Director of the Rehabilitation Services at McCready Health on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.  He became board certified in Orthopedics in 2004 and re-certified in 2014.  He has taken many continuing education courses in order to become certified in vocational rehabilitation, ergonomic assessments, and manual therapeutic interventions (primarily through Michigan State University). He has been a member of the APTA House of Delegates for the Maryland Chapter and continues to serve as a clinical and administrative consultant. https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/07/31/216-jason-craig-creator-morphopedics-com/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/10/30/241-sarah-king-attacks-parkinsons-disease/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/12/21/top-8-2018-sharon-dunn-emma-stokes-csm/ We went LIVE to the University of Maryland Eastern Shore for a live show with faculty, alumni and students. Part 1 features Kate James, Sarah Oleksak, and Michael Rabel

Kate James

Kate James is a Physical Therapist and Assistant Professor at UMES. Prior to joining the faculty full time in 2016, she worked primarily in the outpatient setting. Her current research interests are working to better understand the relationships between physical characteristics and golf performance in older female golfers and using sRPE to predict injury in runners. She also runs a small, mobile cash-based PT practice, Driven Physiotherapy.

Sarah Oleksak

Sarah Oleksak a practicing physical therapist of ten years, with over eight of those years, focused in a multidisciplinary pediatric outpatient clinic. She is a Pediatric Certified Specialist with extensive experience treating patients who have a variety of orthopedic and neuromuscular diagnoses from birth to age 18 years.

Beyond her primary employment, Dr. Oleksak is active in the community in a variety of ways and strives to represent the benefits of physical therapy for the youngest of patients. She serves on the Program Advisory Committee for the local physical therapist assistant program and she has also provided guest lectures on pediatric patient management for these students. Dr. Oleksak is a Clinic Instructor for physical therapy students completing clinical practicums or full clinical affiliations in the pediatric setting. Recently, she contributed to a soon-to-be-released position statement for the American Academy of Pediatrics on the use of infant carrying devices, alongside world-renowned physicians and researchers. In addition, in 2014, Dr. Oleksak founded and currently serves as the executive director of an international 501c3 non-profit organization that provides ergonomic infant carrying devices to children with disabilities. She is a Certified Babywearing Educator and she is currently developing a pilot study on the use of these infant carrying devices for children with torticollis and plagiocephaly.

Michael Rabel

Michael Rabel is the Department Chair and Program Director for the Doctor of Physical Therapy program at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore.  He possesses a Master’s degree in Physical Therapy and a Doctor of Science degree with a concentration in biomechanics and manual interventions.  He was a Clinical Program Leader and Outpatient Coordinator at HealthSouth Chesapeake Rehabilitation Hospital and the Director of the Rehabilitation Services at McCready Health on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.  He became board certified in Orthopedics in 2004 and re-certified in 2014.  He has taken many continuing education courses in order to become certified in vocational rehabilitation, ergonomic assessments, and manual therapeutic interventions (primarily through Michigan State University). He has been a member of the APTA House of Delegates for the Maryland Chapter and continues to serve as a clinical and administrative consultant.
https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/07/31/216-jason-craig-creator-morphopedics-com/
https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/10/30/241-sarah-king-attacks-parkinsons-disease/
https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/12/21/top-8-2018-sharon-dunn-emma-stokes-csm/
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University of Maryland Eastern Shore LIVE Part 1 We went LIVE to the University of Maryland Eastern Shore for a live show with faculty, alumni and students. Part 1 features Kate James, Sarah Oleksak, and Michael Rabel<br /> <br /> Kate James<br /> Kate James is a Physical Therapist and Assistant Professor at UMES. Prior to joining the faculty full time in 2016, she worked primarily in the outpatient setting. Her current research interests are working to better understand the relationships between physical characteristics and golf performance in older female golfers and using sRPE to predict injury in runners. She also runs a small, mobile cash-based PT practice, Driven Physiotherapy.<br /> Sarah Oleksak<br /> <br /> Sarah Oleksak a practicing physical therapist of ten years, with over eight of those years, focused in a multidisciplinary pediatric outpatient clinic. She is a Pediatric Certified Specialist with extensive experience treating patients who have a variety of orthopedic and neuromuscular diagnoses from birth to age 18 years.<br /> <br /> Beyond her primary employment, Dr. Oleksak is active in the community in a variety of ways and strives to represent the benefits of physical therapy for the youngest of patients. She serves on the Program Advisory Committee for the local physical therapist assistant program and she has also provided guest lectures on pediatric patient management for these students. Dr. Oleksak is a Clinic Instructor for physical therapy students completing clinical practicums or full clinical affiliations in the pediatric setting. Recently, she contributed to a soon-to-be-released position statement for the American Academy of Pediatrics on the use of infant carrying devices, alongside world-renowned physicians and researchers. In addition, in 2014, Dr. Oleksak founded and currently serves as the executive director of an international 501c3 non-profit organization that provides ergonomic infant carrying devices to children with disabilities. She is a Certified Babywearing Educator and she is currently developing a pilot study on the use of these infant carrying devices for children with torticollis and plagiocephaly.<br /> <br /> <br /> Michael Rabel<br /> Michael Rabel is the Department Chair and Program Director for the Doctor of Physical Therapy program at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore.  He possesses a Master’s degree in Physical Therapy and a Doctor of Science degree with a concentration in biomechanics and manual interventions.  He was a Clinical Program Leader and Outpatient Coordinator at HealthSouth Chesapeake Rehabilitation Hospital and the Director of the Rehabilitation Services at McCready Health on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.  He became board certified in Orthopedics in 2004 and re-certified in 2014.  He has taken many continuing education courses in order to become certified in vocational rehabilitation, ergonomic assessments, and manual therapeutic interventions (primarily through Michigan State University). He has been a member of the APTA House of Delegates for the Maryland Chapter and continues to serve as a clinical and administrative consultant.<br /> <br /> Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 55:07
335 – Teddy Willsey ACL Research Article https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/10/04/335-teddy-willsey-acl-research-article/ Thu, 04 Oct 2018 14:20:49 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4942 335 - Teddy Willsey ACL Research Article Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 31:26 Clare Ardern Editor in Chief of JOSPT https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/10/02/334-clare-ardern-editor-chief-jospt/ Tue, 02 Oct 2018 14:16:50 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4892 Dr. Clare Ardern is an Australian-trained physiotherapist and senior researcher in sports medicine. Her research has focused on (i) return to sport after injury (rates, determinants of success, improving the clinical approach) and (ii) how high-caliber meta-research (including systematic reviews, network meta-analyses, and clinical practice guidelines) can help clinicians make quality decisions. Dr. Ardern is Editor-in-Chief elect for Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy. Follow Dr. Ardern on Twitter @clare_ardern and @JOSPT Dr. Clare Ardern is an Australian-trained physiotherapist and senior researcher in sports medicine.

Her research has focused on (i) return to sport after injury (rates, determinants of success, improving the clinical approach) and (ii) how high-caliber meta-research (including systematic reviews, network meta-analyses, and clinical practice guidelines) can help clinicians make quality decisions. Dr. Ardern is Editor-in-Chief elect for Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy. Follow Dr. Ardern on Twitter @clare_ardern and @JOSPT

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Clare Ardern Editor in Chief of JOSPT Dr. Clare Ardern is an Australian-trained physiotherapist and senior researcher in sports medicine.



Her research has focused on (i) return to sport after injury (rates, determinants of success, improving the clinical approach) and (ii) how high-caliber meta-research (including systematic reviews, network meta-analyses, and clinical practice guidelines) can help clinicians make quality decisions. Dr. Ardern is Editor-in-Chief elect for Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy. Follow Dr. Ardern on Twitter @clare_ardern and @JOSPT
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 32:33
Chad Cook from Duke University on Research Bootcamp https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/09/25/333-chad-cook-duke-university-research-bootcamp/ Tue, 25 Sep 2018 14:02:12 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4890 Excited to have Chad Cook on the show talking about his new Medbridge course Research Bootcamp. We talked all things research including how he and two other PTs submitted a FAKE RESEARCH PAPER which stated that the BROUGH SOMEONE BACK FROM THE DEAD WITH A SPINAL MANIPULATION. Spoiler Alert: It was accepted (into a predatory journal) Excited to have Chad Cook on the show talking about his new Medbridge course Research Bootcamp. We talked all things research including how he and two other PTs submitted a FAKE RESEARCH PAPER which stated that the BROUGH SOMEONE BACK FROM THE DEAD WITH A SPINAL MANIPULATION.

Spoiler Alert: It was accepted (into a predatory journal)

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Chad Cook from Duke University on Research Bootcamp
Spoiler Alert: It was accepted (into a predatory journal)]]>
Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 23:14
Sheri Walters US Paralympic & USA Woman’s Ice Hockey PT https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/09/21/331-sheri-walters-us-paralympic-usa-womans-ice-hockey-pt/ Fri, 21 Sep 2018 09:00:06 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4709 Sheri Walters US Paralympic & USA Woman's Ice Hockey PT Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 18:08 Efosa Guobadia of PT Day of Service https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/09/20/331-efosa-guobadia-pt-day-service/ Thu, 20 Sep 2018 14:15:55 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4870 Efosa L. Guobadia, Doctor of Physical Therapy, is the Founder of the informational website PT Haven, Co-Founder and Co-Director of PT Day of Service, Co-Founder, President, and CEO of Move Together, a 501(c)3 high-impact for-purpose organization dedicated to improving access to quality rehab medicine around the corner and around the world. He received his BS in Kinesiology from the University of Massachusetts in 2007 and his Doctorate of Physical Therapy from the University of Scranton in 2010. Efosa L. Guobadia, Doctor of Physical Therapy, is the Founder of the informational website PT Haven, Co-Founder and Co-Director of PT Day of Service, Co-Founder, President, and CEO of Move Together, a 501(c)3 high-impact for-purpose organization dedicated to improving access to quality rehab medicine around the corner and around the world. He received his BS in Kinesiology from the University of Massachusetts in 2007 and his Doctorate of Physical Therapy from the University of Scranton in 2010.

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Efosa Guobadia of PT Day of Service Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 33:32
Sam Blanchard Arsenal Women’s Football Physio https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/09/18/330-sam-blanchard-arsenal-womens-football-physio/ Tue, 18 Sep 2018 09:00:02 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4705 Sam Blanchard Arsenal Women's Football Physio Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 43:00 THE Ohio State University LIVE Part 2 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/09/12/329-ohio-state-university-live-part-2/ Wed, 12 Sep 2018 13:10:02 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4865 THE Ohio State University LIVE Part 2 Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 43:46 THE Ohio State University LIVE Part 1 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/09/12/328-ohio-state-university-live-part-1/ Wed, 12 Sep 2018 12:02:20 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4863 THE Ohio State University LIVE Part 1 Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 42:13 Ira Gorman, Joe Heick, and Rupal Patel LIVE @ NEXT https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/09/11/327-ira-gorman-joe-heick-rupal-patel-live-next/ Tue, 11 Sep 2018 09:00:40 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4701 Ira Gorman, Joe Heick, and Rupal Patel LIVE @ NEXT Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 18:05 Linsey Corbin Ironman Wisconsin Champ! THROWBACK! https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/09/10/linsey-corbin-ironman-wisconsin-champ-throwback/ Mon, 10 Sep 2018 13:26:39 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4867 Wanted to congratulate pro triathlete Linsey Corbin on winning Ironman Wisconsin 2018 yesterday with a time of 9:12.39 ! An AMAZING accomplishment, one of her many wins as an athlete. We throw it back to last may when we were lucky enough to have Linsey on the show talking about how a pro triathlete stays in competition form.   Wanted to congratulate pro triathlete Linsey Corbin on winning Ironman Wisconsin 2018 yesterday with a time of 9:12.39 !

An AMAZING accomplishment, one of her many wins as an athlete.

We throw it back to last may when we were lucky enough to have Linsey on the show talking about how a pro triathlete stays in competition form.

 

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Linsey Corbin Ironman Wisconsin Champ! THROWBACK!
An AMAZING accomplishment, one of her many wins as an athlete.

We throw it back to last may when we were lucky enough to have Linsey on the show talking about how a pro triathlete stays in competition form.

 ]]>
Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 34:55
Johnny Owens on BFR, Pint Glasses & Ending Cancer https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/09/05/326-johnny-owens-bfr-pint-glasses-kicking-cancers/ Wed, 05 Sep 2018 22:47:09 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4850 Want to grab a PT Pintcast PT Pintglass that you heard about in the show? Remember all proceeds go to the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation Here's that link:  http://bit.ly/2MFpbZR Want to grab a PT Pintcast PT Pintglass that you heard about in the show?

Remember all proceeds go to the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation

Here’s that link:  http://bit.ly/2MFpbZR

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Johnny Owens on BFR, Pint Glasses & Ending Cancer
Remember all proceeds go to the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation

Here's that link:  http://bit.ly/2MFpbZR]]>
Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 16:07
Kathy Mairella & Maria Aguila from APTANJ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/09/04/325-kathy-mairella-maria-aguila-aptanj/ Tue, 04 Sep 2018 09:00:27 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4703 Kathy Mairella & Maria Aguila from APTANJ Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 27:14 Adam Meakins of @NAF Physio Podcast https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/08/28/324-adam-meakins-naf-physio-podcast/ Tue, 28 Aug 2018 16:00:29 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4815 Adam Meakins of @NAF Physio Podcast Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 34:33 Dr. Steven Cramer MD Neurology Professor https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/08/28/327-dr-steven-cramer-md-neurology-professor/ Tue, 28 Aug 2018 09:00:57 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4707 Dr. Steven Cramer MD Neurology Professor Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 22:04 Northwestern University LIVE Part 2/2 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/08/21/322-northwestern-university-live-part-2-2/ Tue, 21 Aug 2018 10:00:49 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4698 Northwestern University LIVE Part 2/2 Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 34:38 Northwestern University LIVE Part 1/2 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/08/17/321-northwestern-university-live/ Fri, 17 Aug 2018 19:27:58 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4696 Northwestern University LIVE Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 40:51 Danny Matta PT Entrepreneur Podcast https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/08/02/320-danny-matta-pt-entrepreneur-podcast/ Thu, 02 Aug 2018 15:23:18 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4659 Danny Matta PT Entrepreneur Podcast Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 32:35 Mary Elizabeth Parker Genomics & Physical Therapy https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/07/31/319-mary-elizabeth-parker-genomics-physical-therapy/ Tue, 31 Jul 2018 17:55:50 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4657 We talked to Mary Elizabeth Parker about the role of Genomics and Physical Therapy while at the NEXT conference in 2018 in Orlando. We talked to Mary Elizabeth Parker about the role of Genomics and Physical Therapy while at the NEXT conference in 2018 in Orlando.

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Mary Elizabeth Parker Genomics and Physical Therapy We talked to Mary Elizabeth Parker about the role of Genomics and Physical Therapy while at the NEXT conference in 2018 in Orlando. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 15:15
PT Licensure Compact with Aureus Medical Staffing https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/07/24/318-pt-licensure-compact-w-louis-teal-aureus-medical-staffing/ Tue, 24 Jul 2018 17:05:54 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4654 The PT Licensure Compact is an agreement between states to recognize physical therapy licenses in other states involved in the compact.  The agreement has been growing for since 2012 and we check in with Louis Teal of Aureus Medical Staffing to see where the compact stands currently. For more information head to http://ptcompact.org/  The PT Licensure Compact is an agreement between states to recognize physical therapy licenses in other states involved in the compact.  The agreement has been growing for since 2012 and we check in with Louis Teal of Aureus Medical Staffing to see where the compact stands currently.

For more information head to http://ptcompact.org/ 

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PT Licensure Compact with Aureus Medical Staffing
For more information head to http://ptcompact.org/ ]]>
Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 11:06
MGH Institute of Health Professions Part 2 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/07/19/317-mgh-institute-health-professions-part-2/ Thu, 19 Jul 2018 09:00:53 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4650 MGH Institute of Health Professions Part 2 Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 37:34 MGH Institute of Health Professions Part 1 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/07/17/316-mgh-institute-health-professions-part-1/ Tue, 17 Jul 2018 12:17:57 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4647 Thanks to the faculty, staff & students @ MGH Institute of Health Professions for having us host a discussion on interprofessional collaboration.   Thanks to the faculty, staff & students @ MGH Institute of Health Professions for having us host a discussion on interprofessional collaboration.

 

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MGH Institute of Health Professions Part 1
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 36:38
Aureus Medical Staffing $1,000 Scholarship Winner Michael Cromartie, SPT w to Secili DeStefano & Joe Black https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/07/11/aureus-medical-staffing-1000-scholarship-winner-michael-cromartie-spt-w-to-secili-destefano-joe-black/ Wed, 11 Jul 2018 09:00:21 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4640 Aureus Medical Staffing offered a $1,000 scholarship to a current Physical Therapy or Physical Therapist Assistant to attend the 2018 NEXT conference in Orlando.  Micahel Cromartie, a student at the University of Miami DPT program was the winner this year. He received two entries into the conference from the American Physical Therapy Association. A $1,000 Visa Gift Card for travel, hotel and food expenses from Aureus. He was also included in classes from RockTape and Owens Recovery Science. Aureus Medical Staffing offered a $1,000 scholarship to a current Physical Therapy or Physical Therapist Assistant to attend the 2018 NEXT conference in Orlando.  Micahel Cromartie, a student at the University of Miami DPT program was the winner this year.

He received two entries into the conference from the American Physical Therapy Association. A $1,000 Visa Gift Card for travel, hotel and food expenses from Aureus.

He was also included in classes from RockTape and Owens Recovery Science.

]]>
Aureus Medical Staffing $1,000 Scholarship Winner Michael Cromartie, SPT w to Secili DeStefano & Joe Black
He received two entries into the conference from the American Physical Therapy Association. A $1,000 Visa Gift Card for travel, hotel and food expenses from Aureus.

He was also included in classes from RockTape and Owens Recovery Science.]]>
Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 19:24
Meg Lowry creator of Clock Yourself https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/07/09/meg-lowry-creator-of-clock-yourself/ Mon, 09 Jul 2018 09:00:15 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4635 Meg Lowry, creator of Clock Yourself, attained her Bachelor of Physiotherapy in 2007 from the University of QLD, and her Master of Health Services Management from Griffith University in 2015. She has worked at Ipswich General Hospital, RBWH, Mater Mothers Hospital, Redlands Public Hospital and Metro South Aged Care Assessment Team. She has a breadth of experience in the sub-disciplines of acute cardiology, respiratory, gerontology, women’s health, outpatient and post-acute rehabilitation. The Clock Yourself methodology was designed by Brisbane physiotherapist Meg Lowry of Next Step Physio. Meg’s career goal is to tackle the undesirable conditions that we commonly associate with aging; dementia, falls, osteoporosis (and associated fractures), incontinence and prolapse. Clock Yourself is Meg’s flagship software application, and it represents her professional contribution to both the Dementia Prevention and Falls Prevention domains. Meg is excited to present this methodology to the research community with the hope it will be independently investigated. Meg has also produced Balance Yourself, and is now working on other novel clinical innovations that may change our course of aging. Follow Meg Lowry on LinkedIn or  @MegLowryPT on Twitter and like Next Step Physio on Facebook to ensure you don’t miss out on announcements when future preventative health innovations are released. @MegLowryPT @Clock_Yourself https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=k1KBt96FFyc   https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/07/25/whats-appening-nerve-whiz-nervous-system-app/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/04/23/296-duke-university-faculty-residents/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/06/11/308-university-south-carolina-live-part-1/     Meg Lowry, creator of Clock Yourself, attained her Bachelor of Physiotherapy in 2007 from the University of QLD, and her Master of Health Services Management from Griffith University in 2015.

She has worked at Ipswich General Hospital, RBWH, Mater Mothers Hospital, Redlands Public Hospital and Metro South Aged Care Assessment Team.

She has a breadth of experience in the sub-disciplines of acute cardiology, respiratory, gerontology, women’s health, outpatient and post-acute rehabilitation.

The Clock Yourself methodology was designed by Brisbane physiotherapist Meg Lowry of Next Step Physio.

Meg’s career goal is to tackle the undesirable conditions that we commonly associate with aging; dementia, falls, osteoporosis (and associated fractures), incontinence and prolapse.

Clock Yourself is Meg’s flagship software application, and it represents her professional contribution to both the Dementia Prevention and Falls Prevention domains. Meg is excited to present this methodology to the research community with the hope it will be independently investigated.

Meg has also produced Balance Yourself, and is now working on other novel clinical innovations that may change our course of aging.

Follow Meg Lowry on LinkedIn or  @MegLowryPT on Twitter and like Next Step Physio on Facebook to ensure you don’t miss out on announcements when future preventative health innovations are released.

@MegLowryPT

@Clock_Yourself

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=k1KBt96FFyc

 

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/07/25/whats-appening-nerve-whiz-nervous-system-app/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/04/23/296-duke-university-faculty-residents/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/06/11/308-university-south-carolina-live-part-1/

 

 

]]>
Meg Lowry creator of Clock Yourself
She has worked at Ipswich General Hospital, RBWH, Mater Mothers Hospital, Redlands Public Hospital and Metro South Aged Care Assessment Team.

She has a breadth of experience in the sub-disciplines of acute cardiology, respiratory, gerontology, women’s health, outpatient and post-acute rehabilitation.

The Clock Yourself methodology was designed by Brisbane physiotherapist Meg Lowry of Next Step Physio.

Meg’s career goal is to tackle the undesirable conditions that we commonly associate with aging; dementia, falls, osteoporosis (and associated fractures), incontinence and prolapse.

Clock Yourself is Meg’s flagship software application, and it represents her professional contribution to both the Dementia Prevention and Falls Prevention domains. Meg is excited to present this methodology to the research community with the hope it will be independently investigated.

Meg has also produced Balance Yourself, and is now working on other novel clinical innovations that may change our course of aging.

Follow Meg Lowry on LinkedIn or  @MegLowryPT on Twitter and like Next Step Physio on Facebook to ensure you don’t miss out on announcements when future preventative health innovations are released.

@MegLowryPT

@Clock_Yourself

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=k1KBt96FFyc

 

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/07/25/whats-appening-nerve-whiz-nervous-system-app/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/04/23/296-duke-university-faculty-residents/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/06/11/308-university-south-carolina-live-part-1/

 

 ]]>
Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 27:10
Spinal Tap News – July 2018 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/07/06/313-spinal-tap-news-july-2018/ Fri, 06 Jul 2018 09:00:34 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4622 Spinal Tap News - June 2018 Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 11:45 Medical University of South Carolina LIVE Part 2 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/07/05/312-medical-university-south-carolina-live-part-2/ Thu, 05 Jul 2018 09:00:44 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4628 Medical University of South Carolina LIVE Part 2 Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 37:00 Medical University of South Carolina LIVE Part 1 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/07/02/311-medical-university-south-carolina-live-part-1/ Mon, 02 Jul 2018 09:00:42 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4620 Check out this episode from the Medical University of South Carolina where Jimmy was invited to be the keynote speaker at the White Coat Ceremony. We talked to Dr. Lisa Saladin the Vice President of the APTA and asked about her three-year term. We also talked to Dr. Sara Kraft the Director of Neurologic Residency Program at MUSC about how she got involved in her position and the struggles it came with. Lastly, Dr. Mark Bowden Director of DPT at MUSC talks about his journey in the profession. Find out what our guests think that make MUSC unique. The episode finishes with Aureus Medical answering questions about travel PT. Parting shots: Dr. Lisa Saladin: Get engaged in the APTA, build lifelong friendships, get into leadership. Dr. Sara Kraft: Keep challenging yourself. The more challenges you face the further you are going to get. Do not shy away from a challenge because that is how you grow. Dr. Mark Bowden: Don’t lose the passion that brought you here. Check out sites mentioned in our episode: http://www.ptoutcomes.com/home.aspx foxrehab.org https://ptpodcast.com/podcasts/pt-inquest/ Lisa Saladin: http://academicdepartments.musc.edu/frd/about/saladin.html Sara Kraft: http://academicdepartments.musc.edu/chp/directory/faculty/kraft.htm Mark Bowden: http://academicdepartments.musc.edu/chp/directory/faculty/bowdenm.htm Check out this episode from the Medical University of South Carolina where Jimmy was invited
to be the keynote speaker at the White Coat Ceremony. We talked to Dr. Lisa Saladin the Vice
President of the APTA and asked about her three-year term. We also talked to Dr. Sara Kraft the
Director of Neurologic Residency Program at MUSC about how she got involved in her position
and the struggles it came with. Lastly, Dr. Mark Bowden Director of DPT at MUSC talks about
his journey in the profession. Find out what our guests think that make MUSC unique. The episode
finishes with Aureus Medical answering questions about travel PT.

Parting shots:

Dr. Lisa Saladin: Get engaged in the APTA, build lifelong friendships, get into leadership.

Dr. Sara Kraft: Keep challenging yourself. The more challenges you face the further you are
going to get. Do not shy away from a challenge because that is how you grow.

Dr. Mark Bowden: Don’t lose the passion that brought you here.
Check out sites mentioned in our episode:

http://www.ptoutcomes.com/home.aspx

foxrehab.org

https://ptpodcast.com/podcasts/pt-inquest/

Lisa Saladin: http://academicdepartments.musc.edu/frd/about/saladin.html

Sara Kraft: http://academicdepartments.musc.edu/chp/directory/faculty/kraft.htm

Mark Bowden: http://academicdepartments.musc.edu/chp/directory/faculty/bowdenm.htm

]]>
Medical University of South Carolina LIVE Part 1 to be the keynote speaker at the White Coat Ceremony. We talked to Dr. Lisa Saladin the Vice
President of the APTA and asked about her three-year term. We also talked to Dr. Sara Kraft the
Director of Neurologic Residency Program at MUSC about how she got involved in her position
and the struggles it came with. Lastly, Dr. Mark Bowden Director of DPT at MUSC talks about
his journey in the profession. Find out what our guests think that make MUSC unique. The episode
finishes with Aureus Medical answering questions about travel PT.

Parting shots:

Dr. Lisa Saladin: Get engaged in the APTA, build lifelong friendships, get into leadership.

Dr. Sara Kraft: Keep challenging yourself. The more challenges you face the further you are
going to get. Do not shy away from a challenge because that is how you grow.

Dr. Mark Bowden: Don’t lose the passion that brought you here.
Check out sites mentioned in our episode:

http://www.ptoutcomes.com/home.aspx

foxrehab.org

https://ptpodcast.com/podcasts/pt-inquest/

Lisa Saladin: http://academicdepartments.musc.edu/frd/about/saladin.html

Sara Kraft: http://academicdepartments.musc.edu/chp/directory/faculty/kraft.htm

Mark Bowden: http://academicdepartments.musc.edu/chp/directory/faculty/bowdenm.htm]]>
Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 40:10
White Coat Ceremony Keynote Speech @ MUSC DPT https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/06/25/310-keynote-speech-musc-dpt/ Mon, 25 Jun 2018 13:30:44 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4615 Pintcast host Jimmy McKay was asked to give the Keynote speech at the white coat ceremony at the Medical University of South Carolina. He drew upon three stories that helped shape his life and career with the MUSC Class of 2020. The stories were about Fear, Perspective and Finding your Why Pintcast host Jimmy McKay was asked to give the Keynote speech at the white coat ceremony at the Medical University of South Carolina.

He drew upon three stories that helped shape his life and career with the MUSC Class of 2020.

The stories were about Fear, Perspective and Finding your Why

]]>
White Coat Ceremony Keynote Speech @ MUSC DPT
He drew upon three stories that helped shape his life and career with the MUSC Class of 2020.

The stories were about Fear, Perspective and Finding your Why]]>
Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 17:46
University of South Carolina LIVE Part 2 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/06/13/309-university-south-carolina-live-part-2/ Wed, 13 Jun 2018 09:00:46 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4597 The University of South Carolina Physical Therapy live with Robyn Culbertson, Kaci Handlery, and Reed Handlery. Robyn Culbertson Robyn Culbertson is a 3rd year DPT student at the University of South Carolina. After a 15-year career in magazine writing, editing and graphic design, she came to PT school in order to better fill the needs of her triathlon coaching clients and was surprised to find herself drawn to geriatrics. She's the current APTA Student Assembly liaison to PTNow and she volunteers with NeXT at the YMCA and Yoga for Everyone, two community-based classes that strive to make fitness accessible to people of all abilities. We talked about Coming to PT after careers in journalism, triathlons, Geriatrics & volunteerism and being involved with APTA on a national level. Reed Handlery Reed of House Handlery, first of his name, was born in California but raised in the plains of Illinois. Growing up Reed played everything from hacky-sack to rugby, though he wasn't great at either one. He married his high school sweetheart in 2012, the same year they moved to South Carolina for Kaci to begin PT school. With gentle prodding from Kaci, Reed switched career paths from strength and conditioning to PT and began at USC a year behind Kaci. After taking a year off to practice, Reed is currently in the first year of pursuing his PhD in rehabilitation sciences, again at USC. Reed was on a mediocre reality TV show and is currently training for a 24 hour obstacle race. -The role of PT in primary prevention and wellness -Volunteering and giving a hoot -PTs with PhDs, why? -Teaching in a DPT program Kaci Handlery Kaci Handlery. My husband and I come as an action-packed, PT package deal! We love to mountain bike, bungee jump (highest bungee jump from a bridge in the world!), run obstacle course races, and hike with our two dogs. Personally, I earned my bachelors degree at Indiana State University as a scholarship track and field athlete and earned my Doctor of Physical Therapy degree from the University of South Carolina. Now, over two years later I have served as a research physical therapist, acute care physical therapist, and most recently as an adjunct faculty member within USC's physical therapy program. Acute Care Physical Therapy Trauma, Trauma ICU therapy Emergency Department therapy Adjunct faculty - love to teach Research physical therapist at the University of South Carolina. https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/08/21/if-you-cant-breathe-you-cant-function-with-mary-massery/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/02/28/279-kyle-covington-julie-wiebe-apta-csm-2018/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/03/14/283-rich-westrick-tactical-athlete-sig/     The University of South Carolina Physical Therapy live with Robyn Culbertson, Kaci Handlery, and Reed Handlery.

Robyn Culbertson

Robyn Culbertson is a 3rd year DPT student at the University of South Carolina. After a 15-year career in magazine writing, editing and graphic design, she came to PT school in order to better fill the needs of her triathlon coaching clients and was surprised to find herself drawn to geriatrics. She’s the current APTA Student Assembly liaison to PTNow and she volunteers with NeXT at the YMCA and Yoga for Everyone, two community-based classes that strive to make fitness accessible to people of all abilities.

We talked about Coming to PT after careers in journalism, triathlons, Geriatrics & volunteerism and being involved with APTA on a national level.

Reed Handlery

Reed of House Handlery, first of his name, was born in California but raised in the plains of Illinois. Growing up Reed played everything from hacky-sack to rugby, though he wasn’t great at either one. He married his high school sweetheart in 2012, the same year they moved to South Carolina for Kaci to begin PT school. With gentle prodding from Kaci, Reed switched career paths from strength and conditioning to PT and began at USC a year behind Kaci. After taking a year off to practice, Reed is currently in the first year of pursuing his PhD in rehabilitation sciences, again at USC. Reed was on a mediocre reality TV show and is currently training for a 24 hour obstacle race. -The role of PT in primary prevention and wellness -Volunteering and giving a hoot -PTs with PhDs, why? -Teaching in a DPT program

Kaci Handlery

Kaci Handlery. My husband and I come as an action-packed, PT package deal! We love to mountain bike, bungee jump (highest bungee jump from a bridge in the world!), run obstacle course races, and hike with our two dogs. Personally, I earned my bachelors degree at Indiana State University as a scholarship track and field athlete and earned my Doctor of Physical Therapy degree from the University of South Carolina. Now, over two years later I have served as a research physical therapist, acute care physical therapist, and most recently as an adjunct faculty member within USC’s physical therapy program. Acute Care Physical Therapy Trauma, Trauma ICU therapy Emergency Department therapy Adjunct faculty – love to teach Research physical therapist at the University of South Carolina.

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/08/21/if-you-cant-breathe-you-cant-function-with-mary-massery/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/02/28/279-kyle-covington-julie-wiebe-apta-csm-2018/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/03/14/283-rich-westrick-tactical-athlete-sig/

 

 

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University of South Carolina LIVE Part 2 Robyn Culbertson
Robyn Culbertson is a 3rd year DPT student at the University of South Carolina. After a 15-year career in magazine writing, editing and graphic design, she came to PT school in order to better fill the needs of her triathlon coaching clients and was surprised to find herself drawn to geriatrics. She's the current APTA Student Assembly liaison to PTNow and she volunteers with NeXT at the YMCA and Yoga for Everyone, two community-based classes that strive to make fitness accessible to people of all abilities.

We talked about Coming to PT after careers in journalism, triathlons, Geriatrics & volunteerism and being involved with APTA on a national level.
Reed Handlery
Reed of House Handlery, first of his name, was born in California but raised in the plains of Illinois. Growing up Reed played everything from hacky-sack to rugby, though he wasn't great at either one. He married his high school sweetheart in 2012, the same year they moved to South Carolina for Kaci to begin PT school. With gentle prodding from Kaci, Reed switched career paths from strength and conditioning to PT and began at USC a year behind Kaci. After taking a year off to practice, Reed is currently in the first year of pursuing his PhD in rehabilitation sciences, again at USC. Reed was on a mediocre reality TV show and is currently training for a 24 hour obstacle race. -The role of PT in primary prevention and wellness -Volunteering and giving a hoot -PTs with PhDs, why? -Teaching in a DPT program
Kaci Handlery
Kaci Handlery. My husband and I come as an action-packed, PT package deal! We love to mountain bike, bungee jump (highest bungee jump from a bridge in the world!), run obstacle course races, and hike with our two dogs. Personally, I earned my bachelors degree at Indiana State University as a scholarship track and field athlete and earned my Doctor of Physical Therapy degree from the University of South Carolina. Now, over two years later I have served as a research physical therapist, acute care physical therapist, and most recently as an adjunct faculty member within USC's physical therapy program. Acute Care Physical Therapy Trauma, Trauma ICU therapy Emergency Department therapy Adjunct faculty - love to teach Research physical therapist at the University of South Carolina.

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/08/21/if-you-cant-breathe-you-cant-function-with-mary-massery/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/02/28/279-kyle-covington-julie-wiebe-apta-csm-2018/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/03/14/283-rich-westrick-tactical-athlete-sig/

 

 ]]>
Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 37:01
308 – University of South Carolina LIVE Part 1 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/06/11/308-university-south-carolina-live-part-1/ Mon, 11 Jun 2018 09:00:28 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4596 The University of South Carolina LIVE Part 1 with Alicia Flach, Josh Jeffery and Brandon Vaughn. Alicia Flach She Loves all things neuro and is a professor at the University of South Carolina. She is a board-certified neurologic specialist and multiple sclerosis specialist as well as a physical therapy faculty scholar at the Parkinson's Foundation. - everything is experience based plasticity (emphasis on neuroplasticity...although I admit other systems experience plasticity too!) Optimal physical therapy practice should aims to enhance experience-dependent plasticity - advocacy- for our profession, for our patients/clients, for our collective future. It can be a simple "action alert" email or as much as getting to know your state reps. we need to be at the table when PT and healthcare related decisions are happening, the decisions will move forward with or without us. I have to prioritize Recess Brewing Session IPA (Yellow Buss), distant second is cabernet.   Brandon Vaughn The co-owner of a private practice in Columbia, SC called Vertex PT Specialists and the co-host of the Better Faster Podcast. Business/Entrepreneurship/Quality care (i.e. one-on-one vs mill clinics) Loading patients appropriately (i.e. combining strength and conditioning with PT) Transitioned from 2.5 years of a one-man-show cash based clinic to a hybrid clinic that is limited in network. Josh Jeffery - Owner/Head Coach of Carolina Performance Training Coach at Carolina CrossFit Co-Founder of the Better Faster Podcast Education: -Doctor of Physical Therapy Student, The University of South Carolina, expected completion 2019 -Master of Science, Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, 2015 -Bachelor of Science, Business Administration, University of Dayton, 2012 Relevant Certifications: -Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) -USAW Sports Performance Coach -CrossFit Level 2 Trainer -ORS Personalized Blood Flow Restriction Rehabilitation Training -RockTape Rock blades Coaching History: -Carolina Performance Training, August 2015 – Present -Carolina CrossFit, November 2013 – Present - Football Strength & Conditioning Intern, The University of South Carolina, May 2014 – August 2014 -Olympic Sports Strength & Conditioning Intern, Th University of South Carolina, Jan. 2014 – May 2014 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/05/21/thomas-jefferson-university-live-part-1/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/11/02/244-gary-austin-physical-therapy-revolution/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/10/26/apta-national-student-conclave-portland-oregon-2017-student-qa/   The University of South Carolina LIVE Part 1 with Alicia Flach, Josh Jeffery and Brandon Vaughn.

Alicia Flach

She Loves all things neuro and is a professor at the University of South Carolina. She is a board-certified neurologic specialist and multiple sclerosis specialist as well as a physical therapy faculty scholar at the Parkinson’s Foundation. – everything is experience based plasticity (emphasis on neuroplasticity…although I admit other systems experience plasticity too!)

Optimal physical therapy practice should aims to enhance experience-dependent plasticity – advocacy- for our profession, for our patients/clients, for our collective future. It can be a simple “action alert” email or as much as getting to know your state reps. we need to be at the table when PT and healthcare related decisions are happening, the decisions will move forward with or without us. I have to prioritize Recess Brewing Session IPA (Yellow Buss), distant second is cabernet.

 

Brandon Vaughn

The co-owner of a private practice in Columbia, SC called Vertex PT Specialists and the co-host of the Better Faster Podcast. Business/Entrepreneurship/Quality care (i.e. one-on-one vs mill clinics) Loading patients appropriately (i.e. combining strength and conditioning with PT)

Transitioned from 2.5 years of a one-man-show cash based clinic to a hybrid clinic that is limited in network.

Josh Jeffery

– Owner/Head Coach of Carolina Performance Training Coach at Carolina CrossFit Co-Founder of the Better Faster Podcast

Education: -Doctor of Physical Therapy Student, The University of South Carolina, expected completion 2019

-Master of Science, Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, 2015

-Bachelor of Science, Business Administration, University of Dayton, 2012 Relevant Certifications: -Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS)

-USAW Sports Performance Coach -CrossFit Level 2 Trainer -ORS Personalized Blood Flow Restriction Rehabilitation Training -RockTape Rock blades

Coaching History: -Carolina Performance Training, August 2015 – Present -Carolina CrossFit, November 2013 – Present –

Football Strength & Conditioning Intern, The University of South Carolina, May 2014 – August 2014

-Olympic Sports Strength & Conditioning Intern, Th University of South Carolina, Jan. 2014 – May 2014

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/05/21/thomas-jefferson-university-live-part-1/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/11/02/244-gary-austin-physical-therapy-revolution/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/10/26/apta-national-student-conclave-portland-oregon-2017-student-qa/

 

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308 - University of South Carolina LIVE Part 1 Alicia Flach
She Loves all things neuro and is a professor at the University of South Carolina. She is a board-certified neurologic specialist and multiple sclerosis specialist as well as a physical therapy faculty scholar at the Parkinson's Foundation. - everything is experience based plasticity (emphasis on neuroplasticity...although I admit other systems experience plasticity too!)

Optimal physical therapy practice should aims to enhance experience-dependent plasticity - advocacy- for our profession, for our patients/clients, for our collective future. It can be a simple "action alert" email or as much as getting to know your state reps. we need to be at the table when PT and healthcare related decisions are happening, the decisions will move forward with or without us. I have to prioritize Recess Brewing Session IPA (Yellow Buss), distant second is cabernet.

 
Brandon Vaughn
The co-owner of a private practice in Columbia, SC called Vertex PT Specialists and the co-host of the Better Faster Podcast. Business/Entrepreneurship/Quality care (i.e. one-on-one vs mill clinics) Loading patients appropriately (i.e. combining strength and conditioning with PT)

Transitioned from 2.5 years of a one-man-show cash based clinic to a hybrid clinic that is limited in network.
Josh Jeffery
- Owner/Head Coach of Carolina Performance Training Coach at Carolina CrossFit Co-Founder of the Better Faster Podcast

Education: -Doctor of Physical Therapy Student, The University of South Carolina, expected completion 2019

-Master of Science, Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, 2015

-Bachelor of Science, Business Administration, University of Dayton, 2012 Relevant Certifications: -Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS)

-USAW Sports Performance Coach -CrossFit Level 2 Trainer -ORS Personalized Blood Flow Restriction Rehabilitation Training -RockTape Rock blades

Coaching History: -Carolina Performance Training, August 2015 – Present -Carolina CrossFit, November 2013 – Present -

Football Strength & Conditioning Intern, The University of South Carolina, May 2014 – August 2014

-Olympic Sports Strength & Conditioning Intern, Th University of South Carolina, Jan. 2014 – May 2014

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/05/21/thomas-jefferson-university-live-part-1/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/11/02/244-gary-austin-physical-therapy-revolution/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/10/26/apta-national-student-conclave-portland-oregon-2017-student-qa/

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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 35:29
307 – Nine rejection letters with Merritt Walker https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/06/06/nine-rejection-letters-with-merritt-walker/ Wed, 06 Jun 2018 09:00:03 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4593 Merritt Walker got nine rejection letters from Physical Therapy schools his first try. Merritt Walker had to take a hard look at himself and ask if this is really what he wanted to do with his life.  The answer was yes, and here's what he did about it.   Merritt Walker got nine rejection letters from Physical Therapy schools his first try. Merritt Walker had to take a hard look at himself and ask if this is really what he wanted to do with his life.  The answer was yes, and here’s what he did about it.

 

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307 - Nine rejection letters with Merritt Walker
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Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 23:05
306 – Student Loan Education with Heather Jarvis & Kevin Soehner https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/06/04/306-student-loan-education-heather-jarvis-kevin-soehner/ Mon, 04 Jun 2018 09:00:25 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4585 We talk to two experts in finance and student loans, Heather Jarvis from AskHeatherJarvis.com and Kevin Soehner from iGrad.com and enrich.org, to improve your financial literacy. Heather Jarvis - AskHeatherJarvis.com Heather graduated from Duke University School of Law cum laude owing $125,000 in student loans and facing 30-years’ worth of $1,200 monthly payments.  No one ever told Heather that she couldn’t afford to go to Duke, even though, um, she couldn’t.  Her mother was a modestly paid executive assistant and her father a mostly unemployed Shakespearean actor. Heather didn’t realize she couldn’t afford an expensive education until after she got one. At one time, people who earned fancy grades at fancy law schools got offered fancy jobs with fancy paychecks.  Having become all fancyfied, Heather had to decide: take the job she had been dreaming about all her life that only paid $25,000 per year (representing people facing criminal prosecution), or make a boatload of money. Duke Law’s generous loan repayment assistance program made it possible for Heather to eschew the money without defaulting on her student loans (Go Devils!).  She will always be grateful that Duke enabled her to continue ignoring her own financial security in pursuit of her irresistible urge to stand up for people in trouble. Heather has practiced public interest law for more than a dozen years.  Beginning in 2005, Heather focused her advocacy work on reducing the financial barriers to practicing public interest law. Heather has contributed to student debt relief policy for the House Education Committee and others in Congress, and has dedicated her professional efforts to advancing public service loan forgiveness which allows recent graduates to dedicate their careers to the greater good.  Heather leads efforts to establish and expand student debt relief programs and to inform borrowers, schools, and employers about how to benefit from available debt relief programs. Widely recognized by school professionals and media representatives as an expert source of information, Heather has trained thousands of students and professionals and is sought after for her sophisticated legal knowledge and accessible teaching style.   Kevin Soehner - iGrad.com Kevin coordinates interdepartmental communication and workflow while overseeing our back end operational units. Outside the office, Kevin can be found binging on Netflix and lamenting the latest Buffalo sports disappointment. About iGrad - In 2009, a group of financial aid professionals decided to tackle the alarming lack of financial capability among college students. Our sole mission is to empower this population to effectively manage their money, limit and repay their debts, and begin successful careers. Today, iGrad serves over 1.2 million students across 500 schools and organizations around the country. Our award-winning platform equips students with the tools needed to succeed in the real world of personal finance. https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/07/31/216-jason-craig-creator-morphopedics-com/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/09/04/mark-merolli-digital-health-physical-therapy/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/10/19/238-kara-gainer-apta-director-regulatory-affairs/     We talk to two experts in finance and student loans, Heather Jarvis from AskHeatherJarvis.com and Kevin Soehner from iGrad.com and enrich.org, to improve your financial literacy.

Heather Jarvis – AskHeatherJarvis.com

Heather graduated from Duke University School of Law cum laude owing $125,000 in student loans and facing 30-years’ worth of $1,200 monthly payments.  No one ever told Heather that she couldn’t afford to go to Duke, even though, um, she couldn’t.  Her mother was a modestly paid executive assistant and her father a mostly unemployed Shakespearean actor.

Heather didn’t realize she couldn’t afford an expensive education until after she got one.

At one time, people who earned fancy grades at fancy law schools got offered fancy jobs with fancy paychecks.  Having become all fancyfied, Heather had to decide: take the job she had been dreaming about all her life that only paid $25,000 per year (representing people facing criminal prosecution), or make a boatload of money.

Duke Law’s generous loan repayment assistance program made it possible for Heather to eschew the money without defaulting on her student loans (Go Devils!).  She will always be grateful that Duke enabled her to continue ignoring her own financial security in pursuit of her irresistible urge to stand up for people in trouble.

Heather has practiced public interest law for more than a dozen years.  Beginning in 2005, Heather focused her advocacy work on reducing the financial barriers to practicing public interest law.

Heather has contributed to student debt relief policy for the House Education Committee and others in Congress, and has dedicated her professional efforts to advancing public service loan forgiveness which allows recent graduates to dedicate their careers to the greater good.  Heather leads efforts to establish and expand student debt relief programs and to inform borrowers, schools, and employers about how to benefit from available debt relief programs.

Widely recognized by school professionals and media representatives as an expert source of information, Heather has trained thousands of students and professionals and is sought after for her sophisticated legal knowledge and accessible teaching style.

 

Kevin Soehner – iGrad.com

Kevin coordinates interdepartmental communication and workflow while overseeing our back end operational units. Outside the office, Kevin can be found binging on Netflix and lamenting the latest Buffalo sports disappointment.

About iGrad –

In 2009, a group of financial aid professionals decided to tackle the alarming lack of financial capability among college students. Our sole mission is to empower this population to effectively manage their money, limit and repay their debts, and begin successful careers.

Today, iGrad serves over 1.2 million students across 500 schools and organizations around the country. Our award-winning platform equips students with the tools needed to succeed in the real world of personal finance.

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/07/31/216-jason-craig-creator-morphopedics-com/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/09/04/mark-merolli-digital-health-physical-therapy/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/10/19/238-kara-gainer-apta-director-regulatory-affairs/

 

 

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306 - Student Loan Education with Heather Jarvis & Kevin Soehner Heather Jarvis - AskHeatherJarvis.com
Heather graduated from Duke University School of Law cum laude owing $125,000 in student loans and facing 30-years’ worth of $1,200 monthly payments.  No one ever told Heather that she couldn’t afford to go to Duke, even though, um, she couldn’t.  Her mother was a modestly paid executive assistant and her father a mostly unemployed Shakespearean actor.

Heather didn’t realize she couldn’t afford an expensive education until after she got one.

At one time, people who earned fancy grades at fancy law schools got offered fancy jobs with fancy paychecks.  Having become all fancyfied, Heather had to decide: take the job she had been dreaming about all her life that only paid $25,000 per year (representing people facing criminal prosecution), or make a boatload of money.

Duke Law’s generous loan repayment assistance program made it possible for Heather to eschew the money without defaulting on her student loans (Go Devils!).  She will always be grateful that Duke enabled her to continue ignoring her own financial security in pursuit of her irresistible urge to stand up for people in trouble.

Heather has practiced public interest law for more than a dozen years.  Beginning in 2005, Heather focused her advocacy work on reducing the financial barriers to practicing public interest law.

Heather has contributed to student debt relief policy for the House Education Committee and others in Congress, and has dedicated her professional efforts to advancing public service loan forgiveness which allows recent graduates to dedicate their careers to the greater good.  Heather leads efforts to establish and expand student debt relief programs and to inform borrowers, schools, and employers about how to benefit from available debt relief programs.

Widely recognized by school professionals and media representatives as an expert source of information, Heather has trained thousands of students and professionals and is sought after for her sophisticated legal knowledge and accessible teaching style.

 
Kevin Soehner - iGrad.com
Kevin coordinates interdepartmental communication and workflow while overseeing our back end operational units. Outside the office, Kevin can be found binging on Netflix and lamenting the latest Buffalo sports disappointment.

About iGrad -

In 2009, a group of financial aid professionals decided to tackle the alarming lack of financial capability among college students. Our sole mission is to empower this population to effectively manage their money, limit and repay their debts, and begin successful careers.

Today, iGrad serves over 1.2 million students across 500 schools and organizations around the country. Our award-winning platform equips students with the tools needed to succeed in the real world of personal finance.

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/07/31/216-jason-craig-creator-morphopedics-com/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/09/04/mark-merolli-digital-health-physical-therapy/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/10/19/238-kara-gainer-apta-director-regulatory-affairs/

 

 ]]>
Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 39:53
305 – Breaking News from Emma Stokes WCPT Global Rehabilitation Alliance https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/05/29/305-breaking-news-emma-stokes-wcpt-global-rehabilitation-alliance/ Tue, 29 May 2018 13:50:02 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4578 The WCPT President Emma Stokes signed our profession into a Global Rehabilitation Alliance late last week. What does that actually mean for the WCPT and you as a Physical Therapist?  We talk to Emma to find out, plus a deeper look at WCPT Congress 2019 & the newly announced location for WCPT 2021 in Dubai. Here is what the official statement of the WCPT says on the announcement. The WCPT President Emma Stokes signed our profession into a Global Rehabilitation Alliance late last week.

What does that actually mean for the WCPT and you as a Physical Therapist?  We talk to Emma to find out, plus a deeper look at WCPT Congress 2019 & the newly announced location for WCPT 2021 in Dubai.

Here is what the official statement of the WCPT says on the announcement.

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305 - Breaking News from Emma Stokes WCPT Global Rehabilitation Alliance The WCPT President Emma Stokes signed our profession into a Global Rehabilitation Alliance late last week.  <br /> <br /> What does that actually mean for the WCPT and you as a Physical Therapist?  We talk to Emma to find out, plus a deeper look at WCPT Congress 2019 & the newly announced location for WCPT 2021 in Dubai. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 12:59
304 – Patrick Berner plus Ryan & Amanda Maddrey LIVE from Greenville SC https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/05/28/304-patrick-berner-plus-ryan-amanda-maddrey-live-greenville-sc/ Mon, 28 May 2018 09:00:48 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4555 We went to Greenville South Carolina for a live show featuring Patrick Berner and The Maddrey's, Ryan and Amanda. Patrick is a PT and a registered dietician and helps us see deeper into the why of focusing on diet within our PT plans of care with patients. Link to Patrick's website where he combines PT with being an RD.  Ryan Maddrey is a PT and his wife Amanda is an OT. They went through college and graduate school together and showed us some parallels and lessons they learned from each other while going through PT & OT school at the same time. Ryan's twitter feed: @theMaddPT Amanda's (hopefully now active twitter feed) @amandakeytheot    We went to Greenville South Carolina for a live show featuring Patrick Berner and The Maddrey’s, Ryan and Amanda.

Patrick is a PT and a registered dietician and helps us see deeper into the why of focusing on diet within our PT plans of care with patients.

Link to Patrick’s website where he combines PT with being an RD. 

Ryan Maddrey is a PT and his wife Amanda is an OT. They went through college and graduate school together and showed us some parallels and lessons they learned from each other while going through PT & OT school at the same time.

Ryan’s twitter feed: @theMaddPT

Amanda’s (hopefully now active twitter feed) @amandakeytheot 

 

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304 - Patrick Berner plus Ryan & Amanda Maddrey LIVE from Greenville SC We went to Greenville South Carolina for a live show featuring Patrick Berner and The Maddrey's, Ryan and Amanda.<br /> <br /> Patrick is a PT and a registered dietician and helps us see deeper into the why of focusing on diet within our PT plans of care with patients. <br /> <br /> Link to Patrick's website where he combines PT with being an RD. <br /> <br /> Ryan Maddrey is a PT and his wife Amanda is an OT. They went through college and graduate school together and showed us some parallels and lessons they learned from each other while going through PT & OT school at the same time.<br /> <br /> Ryan's twitter feed: @theMaddPT<br /> <br /> Amanda's (hopefully now active twitter feed) @amandakeytheot <br /> <br /> Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 25:58
303 – Thomas Jefferson University LIVE Part 2 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/05/23/303-thomas-jefferson-university-live-part-2/ Wed, 23 May 2018 09:00:02 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4552 We went to Thomas Jefferson University in the city of brotherly love with students and professors from TJ, Temple, University of the Sciences, Widener and Drexel for a live show and then a few beers. David Logerstedt, Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy at University of the Sciences. Current candidate for President of the Sports Section. A researcher with over 30 publications on knee and shoulder injuries. Coordinator of the Musculoskeletal Track at USciences. He holds 2 Master’s degrees in physical therapy and exercises physiology and a doctoral degree in biomechanics. He is board certified clinical specialist in sports physical therapy. Rebecca Vernon Rebecca is an assistant professor at Temple University and continues clinical practice in the acute care and inpatient rehab settings at Temple University Hospital and Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. She earned her NCS through the ABPTS in 2015. If she is not teaching or planning health care service opportunities for her students, she is enjoying the outdoors (either road cycling or running). Sara Tomaszewski -Faculty in Drexel University's Dept of PT and Rehabilitation Sciences, where I teach in the DPT program and treat patients in all 3 of our faculty run practice locations in the city -Board certified in Orthopaedic PT -BA from Temple University and DPT from Duke University Lisa Hoglund an Associate Professor at Thomas Jefferson University. She is an ABPTS certified Orthopaedic Clinical Specialist and is Certified in Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy.a physical therapist who loves treating patients with knee and spine pain almost as much as she loves her alma mater, the University of Michigan. Dr. Hoglund’s research interests include investigation of conservative interventions for and factors related to painful conditions of the knee joints, with a focus on knee osteoarthritis and patellofemoral pain. Current research projects include studies investigating a supervised exercise program for persons with patellofemoral osteoarthritis and development of novel physical performance measures for persons with knee osteoarthritis. Dr. Hoglund’s clinical interests include conservative interventions for knee osteoarthritis, patellofemoral pain, and painful conditions of the low back and neck. https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/01/10/top-10-2018-stuart-mcgill/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/10/09/235-doug-kechijian-pararescuemen-resilient-pt/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/07/17/212-dennis-fell-barry-dale-neuroplastic-changes-orthopedic-patients/   We went to Thomas Jefferson University in the city of brotherly love with students and professors from TJ, Temple, University of the Sciences, Widener and Drexel for a live show and then a few beers.

David Logerstedt, Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy at University of the Sciences. Current candidate for President of the Sports Section. A researcher with over 30 publications on knee and shoulder injuries. Coordinator of the Musculoskeletal Track at USciences. He holds 2 Master’s degrees in physical therapy and exercises physiology and a doctoral degree in biomechanics. He is board certified clinical specialist in sports physical therapy.

Rebecca Vernon
Rebecca is an assistant professor at Temple University and continues clinical practice in the acute care and inpatient rehab settings at Temple University Hospital and Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. She earned her NCS through the ABPTS in 2015. If she is not teaching or planning health care service opportunities for her students, she is enjoying the outdoors (either road cycling or running).

Sara Tomaszewski
-Faculty in Drexel University’s Dept of PT and Rehabilitation Sciences, where I teach in the DPT program and treat patients in all 3 of our faculty run practice locations in the city
-Board certified in Orthopaedic PT
-BA from Temple University and DPT from Duke University

Lisa Hoglund an Associate Professor at Thomas Jefferson University. She is an ABPTS certified Orthopaedic Clinical Specialist and is Certified in Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy.a physical therapist who loves treating patients with knee and spine pain almost as much as she loves her alma mater, the University of Michigan. Dr. Hoglund’s research interests include investigation of conservative interventions for and factors related to painful conditions of the knee joints, with a focus on knee osteoarthritis and patellofemoral pain. Current research projects include studies investigating a supervised exercise program for persons with patellofemoral osteoarthritis and development of novel physical performance measures for persons with knee osteoarthritis. Dr. Hoglund’s clinical interests include conservative interventions for knee osteoarthritis, patellofemoral pain, and painful conditions of the low back and neck.

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/01/10/top-10-2018-stuart-mcgill/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/10/09/235-doug-kechijian-pararescuemen-resilient-pt/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/07/17/212-dennis-fell-barry-dale-neuroplastic-changes-orthopedic-patients/

 

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303 - Thomas Jefferson University LIVE Part 2 We went to Thomas Jefferson University in the city of brotherly love with students and professors from TJ, Temple, University of the Sciences, Widener and Drexel for a live show and then a few beers.<br /> <br /> David Logerstedt, Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy at University of the Sciences. Current candidate for President of the Sports Section. A researcher with over 30 publications on knee and shoulder injuries. Coordinator of the Musculoskeletal Track at USciences. He holds 2 Master’s degrees in physical therapy and exercises physiology and a doctoral degree in biomechanics. He is board certified clinical specialist in sports physical therapy.<br /> <br /> Rebecca Vernon<br /> Rebecca is an assistant professor at Temple University and continues clinical practice in the acute care and inpatient rehab settings at Temple University Hospital and Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. She earned her NCS through the ABPTS in 2015. If she is not teaching or planning health care service opportunities for her students, she is enjoying the outdoors (either road cycling or running).<br /> <br /> Sara Tomaszewski<br /> -Faculty in Drexel University's Dept of PT and Rehabilitation Sciences, where I teach in the DPT program and treat patients in all 3 of our faculty run practice locations in the city<br /> -Board certified in Orthopaedic PT<br /> -BA from Temple University and DPT from Duke University<br /> <br /> Lisa Hoglund an Associate Professor at Thomas Jefferson University. She is an ABPTS certified Orthopaedic Clinical Specialist and is Certified in Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy.a physical therapist who loves treating patients with knee and spine pain almost as much as she loves her alma mater, the University of Michigan. Dr. Hoglund’s research interests include investigation of conservative interventions for and factors related to painful conditions of the knee joints, with a focus on knee osteoarthritis and patellofemoral pain. Current research projects include studies investigating a supervised exercise program for persons with patellofemoral osteoarthritis and development of novel physical performance measures for persons with knee osteoarthritis. Dr. Hoglund’s clinical interests include conservative interventions for knee osteoarthritis, patellofemoral pain, and painful conditions of the low back and neck. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 43:28
302 – Thomas Jefferson University LIVE Part 1 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/05/21/thomas-jefferson-university-live-part-1/ Mon, 21 May 2018 09:00:51 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4549 We went to Thomas Jefferson University in the city of brotherly love with students and professors from TJ, Temple, University of the Sciences, Widener and Drexel for a live show and then a few beers. David Logerstedt, Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy at University of the Sciences. Current candidate for President of the Sports Section. A researcher with over 30 publications on knee and shoulder injuries. Coordinator of the Musculoskeletal Track at USciences. He holds 2 Master’s degrees in physical therapy and exercises physiology and a doctoral degree in biomechanics. He is board certified clinical specialist in sports physical therapy. Rebecca Vernon Rebecca is an assistant professor at Temple University and continues clinical practice in the acute care and inpatient rehab settings at Temple University Hospital and Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. She earned her NCS through the ABPTS in 2015. If she is not teaching or planning health care service opportunities for her students, she is enjoying the outdoors (either road cycling or running). Sara Tomaszewski -Faculty in Drexel University's Dept of PT and Rehabilitation Sciences, where I teach in the DPT program and treat patients in all 3 of our faculty run practice locations in the city -Board certified in Orthopaedic PT -BA from Temple University and DPT from Duke University Lisa Hoglund, an Associate Professor at Thomas Jefferson University. She is an ABPTS certified Orthopaedic Clinical Specialist and is Certified in Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy. She is a physical therapist who loves treating patients with knee and spine pain almost as much as she loves her alma mater, the University of Michigan. Dr. Hoglund’s research interests include investigation of conservative interventions for and factors related to painful conditions of the knee joints, with a focus on knee osteoarthritis and patellofemoral pain. Current research projects include studies investigating a supervised exercise program for persons with patellofemoral osteoarthritis and development of novel physical performance measures for persons with knee osteoarthritis. Dr. Hoglund’s clinical interests include conservative interventions for knee osteoarthritis, patellofemoral pain, and painful conditions of the low back and neck.   https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/11/29/258-jason-bellamy/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/10/16/8-reasons-join-physical-therapy-outcomes-registry/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2015/10/25/ep-25-student-qa-at-nsc-with-sharon-dunn-part-1/     We went to Thomas Jefferson University in the city of brotherly love with students and professors from TJ, Temple, University of the Sciences, Widener and Drexel for a live show and then a few beers.

David Logerstedt, Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy at University of the Sciences. Current candidate for President of the Sports Section. A researcher with over 30 publications on knee and shoulder injuries. Coordinator of the Musculoskeletal Track at USciences. He holds 2 Master’s degrees in physical therapy and exercises physiology and a doctoral degree in biomechanics. He is board certified clinical specialist in sports physical therapy.

Rebecca Vernon
Rebecca is an assistant professor at Temple University and continues clinical practice in the acute care and inpatient rehab settings at Temple University Hospital and Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. She earned her NCS through the ABPTS in 2015. If she is not teaching or planning health care service opportunities for her students, she is enjoying the outdoors (either road cycling or running).

Sara Tomaszewski
-Faculty in Drexel University’s Dept of PT and Rehabilitation Sciences, where I teach in the DPT program and treat patients in all 3 of our faculty run practice locations in the city
-Board certified in Orthopaedic PT
-BA from Temple University and DPT from Duke University

Lisa Hoglund, an Associate Professor at Thomas Jefferson University. She is an ABPTS certified Orthopaedic Clinical Specialist and is Certified in Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy. She is a physical therapist who loves treating patients with knee and spine pain almost as much as she loves her alma mater, the University of Michigan. Dr. Hoglund’s research interests include investigation of conservative interventions for and factors related to painful conditions of the knee joints, with a focus on knee osteoarthritis and patellofemoral pain. Current research projects include studies investigating a supervised exercise program for persons with patellofemoral osteoarthritis and development of novel physical performance measures for persons with knee osteoarthritis. Dr. Hoglund’s clinical interests include conservative interventions for knee osteoarthritis, patellofemoral pain, and painful conditions of the low back and neck.

 

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/11/29/258-jason-bellamy/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/10/16/8-reasons-join-physical-therapy-outcomes-registry/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2015/10/25/ep-25-student-qa-at-nsc-with-sharon-dunn-part-1/

 

 

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302 - Thomas Jefferson University LIVE Part 1 We went to Thomas Jefferson University in the city of brotherly love with students and professors from TJ, Temple, University of the Sciences, Widener and Drexel for a live show and then a few beers.<br /> <br /> David Logerstedt, Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy at University of the Sciences. Current candidate for President of the Sports Section. A researcher with over 30 publications on knee and shoulder injuries. Coordinator of the Musculoskeletal Track at USciences. He holds 2 Master’s degrees in physical therapy and exercises physiology and a doctoral degree in biomechanics. He is board certified clinical specialist in sports physical therapy.<br /> <br /> Rebecca Vernon<br /> Rebecca is an assistant professor at Temple University and continues clinical practice in the acute care and inpatient rehab settings at Temple University Hospital and Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. She earned her NCS through the ABPTS in 2015. If she is not teaching or planning health care service opportunities for her students, she is enjoying the outdoors (either road cycling or running).<br /> <br /> Sara Tomaszewski<br /> -Faculty in Drexel University's Dept of PT and Rehabilitation Sciences, where I teach in the DPT program and treat patients in all 3 of our faculty run practice locations in the city<br /> -Board certified in Orthopaedic PT<br /> -BA from Temple University and DPT from Duke University<br /> <br /> Lisa Hoglund, an Associate Professor at Thomas Jefferson University. She is an ABPTS certified Orthopaedic Clinical Specialist and is Certified in Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy. She is a physical therapist who loves treating patients with knee and spine pain almost as much as she loves her alma mater, the University of Michigan. Dr. Hoglund’s research interests include investigation of conservative interventions for and factors related to painful conditions of the knee joints, with a focus on knee osteoarthritis and patellofemoral pain. Current research projects include studies investigating a supervised exercise program for persons with patellofemoral osteoarthritis and development of novel physical performance measures for persons with knee osteoarthritis. Dr. Hoglund’s clinical interests include conservative interventions for knee osteoarthritis, patellofemoral pain, and painful conditions of the low back and neck.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 32:46
301 – BJM Dementia Article Analysis w Eric Vidoni PT, PhD https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/05/18/bjm-dementia-article-analysis-w-eric-vidoni-pt-phd/ Sat, 19 May 2018 00:30:55 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4546 An article from the British Journal of Medicine was released that concluded, "A moderate to high intensity aerobic and strength exercise training program does not slow cognitive impairment in people with mild to moderate dementia. The exercise training program improved physical fitness, but there were no noticeable improvements in other clinical outcomes." Full article available here: https://www.bmj.com/content/361/bmj.k1675 There was a TON of chatter about the article since it's release, so we brought in Eric Vidoni, PT, PhD who is a research assistant professor in the Department of Neurology at the University of Kansas Medical Center. His research focus is using brain imaging and other techniques to quantify change in brain health and ability to be independent as we age or develop Alzheimer's disease. Will this cause rehabilitation programs to stop exercise... listen to find out. https://www.ptpintcast.com/2015/11/23/shirley-sahrmann-movement-system-washington-university-st-louis/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/04/25/297-duke-universitys-corey-simon-elons-melissa-scales/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/11/20/tim-difrancisco/     An article from the British Journal of Medicine was released that concluded, “A moderate to high intensity aerobic and strength exercise training program does not slow cognitive impairment in people with mild to moderate dementia. The exercise training program improved physical fitness, but there were no noticeable improvements in other clinical outcomes.”

Full article available here: https://www.bmj.com/content/361/bmj.k1675

There was a TON of chatter about the article since it’s release, so we brought in Eric Vidoni, PT, PhD who is a research assistant professor in the Department of Neurology at the University of Kansas Medical Center. His research focus is using brain imaging and other techniques to quantify change in brain health and ability to be independent as we age or develop Alzheimer’s disease.

Will this cause rehabilitation programs to stop exercise… listen to find out.

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2015/11/23/shirley-sahrmann-movement-system-washington-university-st-louis/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/04/25/297-duke-universitys-corey-simon-elons-melissa-scales/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/11/20/tim-difrancisco/

 

 

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301 - BJM Alzheimer's Article Analysis w Eric Vidoni PT, PhD An article from the British Journal of Medicine was released that concluded, "A moderate to high intensity aerobic and strength exercise training program does not slow cognitive impairment in people with mild to moderate dementia. The exercise training program improved physical fitness, but there were no noticeable improvements in other clinical outcomes." from https://www.bmj.com/content/361/bmj.k1675<br /> <br /> There was a TON of chatter about the article since it's release, so we brought in Eric Vidoni, PT, PhD who is a research assistant professor in the Department of Neurology at the University of Kansas Medical Center. His research focus is using brain imaging and other techniques to quantify change in brain health and ability to be independent as we age or develop Alzheimer's disease. <br /> <br /> Will this cause rehabilitation programs to stop exercise... listen to find out. Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 7:02
A celebratory beer for Episode 300 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/05/16/300-celebratory-beer-skye-donovan-liz-kerrigan/ Wed, 16 May 2018 21:58:14 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4544 We talked about past 299 episodes as well as where things stand now and what things could be coming in the future of the PT Pintcast! We talked about past 299 episodes as well as where things stand now and what things could be coming in the future of the PT Pintcast!

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300 - A celebratory beer with Skye Donovan & Liz Kerrigan Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 52:47
Who’s NEXT? Scholarship Winner SPT2 Michael Cromartie https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/05/02/whos-next-scholarship-winner-spt2-michael-cromartie/ Wed, 02 May 2018 14:49:05 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4524 We are thrilled to announce the winner of the Who's NEXT scholarship from Aureus Medical Staffing. The inaugural winner is Michael Cromartie from the University of Miami! Michael (and his roommate) are coming to the APTA’s NEXT conference this June 27-30th in Orlando Florida!  They get conference passes completely covered for the entire event. Plus! $1,000 in travel money for a flight, rental car, hotel, food (and maybe a beer or two…) that’s from our great friends and longtime partners at Aureus Medical Staffing. They're the leader in Travel PT assignments across the United States, more info at AUREUSmedical.com they made this scholarship possible. We’re also making them part of the show as executive producers, to pick the guests/ help us host an episode! But, there's more! An FMT basic or FMT blades course with a set of rock blades from ROCKTAPE! for Michael & his classmate. And A course from Owens recovery science on BFR on blood flow restriction rehabilitation training! The total value of this scholarship is worth $6,900! https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/06/19/204-robin-west-inova-capitol-city-sports-medicine-summit/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/09/25/230-alicia-white-working-patients-prosthetics/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/11/27/256-ryan-maddrey-stress-eustress-stress/     We are thrilled to announce the winner of the Who’s NEXT scholarship from Aureus Medical Staffing.

The inaugural winner is Michael Cromartie from the University of Miami!

Michael (and his roommate) are coming to the APTA’s NEXT conference this June 27-30th in Orlando Florida!  They get conference passes completely covered for the entire event.

Plus! $1,000 in travel money for a flight, rental car, hotel, food (and maybe a beer or two…) that’s from our great friends and longtime partners at Aureus Medical Staffing. They’re the leader in Travel PT assignments across the United States, more info at AUREUSmedical.com they made this scholarship possible.

We’re also making them part of the show as executive producers, to pick the guests/ help us host an episode!

But, there’s more! An FMT basic or FMT blades course with a set of rock blades from ROCKTAPE! for Michael & his classmate.

And

A course from Owens recovery science on BFR on blood flow restriction rehabilitation training!

The total value of this scholarship is worth $6,900!

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/06/19/204-robin-west-inova-capitol-city-sports-medicine-summit/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/09/25/230-alicia-white-working-patients-prosthetics/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/11/27/256-ryan-maddrey-stress-eustress-stress/

 

 

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Who's NEXT? Scholarship Winner SPT2 Michael Cromartie We are thrilled to announce the winner of the Who's NEXT scholarship from Aureus Medical Staffing.<br /> <br /> The inaugural winner is Michael Cromartie from the University of Miami!<br /> <br /> Michael (and his roommate) are coming to the APTA’s NEXT conference this June 27-30th in Orlando Florida!  They get conference passes completely covered for the entire event.<br /> <br /> Plus! $1,000 in travel money for a flight, rental car, hotel, food (and maybe a beer or two…) that’s from our great friends and longtime partners at Aureus Medical Staffing. They're the leader in Travel PT assignments across the United States, more info at AUREUSmedical.com they made this scholarship possible.<br /> <br /> We’re also making them part of the show as executive producers, to pick the guests/ help us host an episode!<br /> <br /> But, there's more! An FMT basic or FMT blades course with a set of rock blades from ROCKTAPE! for Michael & his classmate.<br /> <br /> And<br /> <br /> A course from Owens recovery science on BFR on blood flow restriction rehabilitation training!<br /> <br /> The total value of this scholarship is worth $6,900! Hosted by Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 5:53
299 – Nazareth College LIVE Part 2 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/05/02/299-nazareth-college-live-part-2/ Wed, 02 May 2018 09:00:48 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4519 299 - Nazareth College LIVE Part 2 Catch the second half of our interviews from the Upstate New York Student Conclave at Nazareth College. Listen to J.J.’s journey through the PT profession and how her growing up close to the profession impacted her career. Then hear students’ in the audience have their questions answered by the panel. J.J. Mowder-Tinney received her Master of Science in PT from the University of Miami and her DPT from NOVA Southeastern University. She has over 20 years of experience in various settings and is the current Chair of the Physical Therapy program at Nazareth College. Quote: “It’s kind of fun to do the impossible” –Walt Disney Who you should know more about Jim Lynskey: http://ans.engineering.asu.edu/people/lynskey.php https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/01/19/266-apta-outcomes-registry-update/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/07/19/213-jamie-dyson-steven-ambler-next-2017-pt-dx-multidisciplinary-education/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/04/19/294-georgia-pt-association-impact-conference-part-1/   299 – Nazareth College LIVE Part 2

Catch the second half of our interviews from the Upstate New York Student Conclave at
Nazareth College. Listen to J.J.’s journey through the PT profession and how her growing up
close to the profession impacted her career. Then hear students’ in the audience have their
questions answered by the panel.
J.J. Mowder-Tinney received her Master of Science in PT from the University of Miami and her
DPT from NOVA Southeastern University. She has over 20 years of experience in various
settings and is the current Chair of the Physical Therapy program at Nazareth College.

Quote: “It’s kind of fun to do the impossible” –Walt Disney

Who you should know more about Jim Lynskey:
http://ans.engineering.asu.edu/people/lynskey.php

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/01/19/266-apta-outcomes-registry-update/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/07/19/213-jamie-dyson-steven-ambler-next-2017-pt-dx-multidisciplinary-education/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/04/19/294-georgia-pt-association-impact-conference-part-1/

 

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299 - Nazareth College LIVE Part 2 Catch the second half of our interviews from the Upstate New York Student Conclave at<br /> Nazareth College. Listen to J.J.’s journey through the PT profession and how her growing up<br /> close to the profession impacted her career. Then hear students’ in the audience have their<br /> questions answered by the panel.<br /> J.J. Mowder-Tinney received her Master of Science in PT from the University of Miami and her<br /> DPT from NOVA Southeastern University. She has over 20 years of experience in various<br /> settings and is the current Chair of the Physical Therapy program at Nazareth College.<br /> Quote: “It’s kind of fun to do the impossible” –Walt Disney<br /> Who you should know more about: Jim Lynskey:<br /> http://ans.engineering.asu.edu/people/lynskey.php Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 47:12
298 – Nazareth College LIVE Part 1 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/04/30/298-nazareth-college-live-part-1/ Mon, 30 Apr 2018 09:00:13 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4517 Hear from three Nazareth College Physical Therapy professors at the Upstate New York Student Conclave. Michael talks about his passions and the importance of connections. Andrew elaborates on what he brings to the profession taking a nontraditional route to PT. Wrapping up the episode, Jennifer shares lessons learned from her patients in the adult neuro and pediatrics settings. Michael Huson received his DPT from A.T. Still University in Mesa, AZ. He is currently a professor in the PT program at Nazareth College and owner of Huson Physical Therapy. Book Michael recommended: The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, by Douglas Adams Andrew Bartlett received his PhD in Physical Therapy from Nova Southwestern University. He currently teaches full time at Nazareth College and works part time in the home health setting. Book Andrew recommended: But Where is the Lamb, by James Goodman Jennifer Fay received her master of science in PT from Ithaca college. She has practiced in various settings for 20 years and is currently teaching full time at Nazareth College in the PT program. Book Jennifer recommended: Quiet, by Susan Cain Want to know more about someone mentioned in the episode? Michael Napierala: http://peakptrochester.com/michael-napierala/ Ellen Hillegas: http://www.educationresourcesinc.com/faculty-details/ellen-hillegass J.J. Mowder-Tinney: https://www2.naz.edu/dept/physical-therapy/faculty-staff/jj-mowder-tinney/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/about-pt-pintcast/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/11/02/244-gary-austin-physical-therapy-revolution/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2015/10/26/ep-25-student-qa-at-nsc-with-sharon-dunn-part-2/ Hear from three Nazareth College Physical Therapy professors at the Upstate New York Student Conclave. Michael talks about his passions and the importance of connections. Andrew elaborates on what he brings to the profession taking a nontraditional route to PT. Wrapping up the episode, Jennifer shares lessons learned from her patients in the adult neuro and pediatrics settings.

Michael Huson received his DPT from A.T. Still University in Mesa, AZ. He is currently a professor in the PT program at Nazareth College and owner of Huson Physical Therapy.

Book Michael recommended: The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, by Douglas Adams

Andrew Bartlett received his PhD in Physical Therapy from Nova Southwestern University. He currently teaches full time at Nazareth College and works part time in the home health setting.

Book Andrew recommended: But Where is the Lamb, by James Goodman

Jennifer Fay received her master of science in PT from Ithaca college. She has practiced in various settings for 20 years and is currently teaching full time at Nazareth College in the PT program.

Book Jennifer recommended: Quiet, by Susan Cain

Want to know more about someone mentioned in the episode?

Michael Napierala: http://peakptrochester.com/michael-napierala/

Ellen Hillegas: http://www.educationresourcesinc.com/faculty-details/ellen-hillegass

J.J. Mowder-Tinney: https://www2.naz.edu/dept/physical-therapy/faculty-staff/jj-mowder-tinney/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/about-pt-pintcast/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/11/02/244-gary-austin-physical-therapy-revolution/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2015/10/26/ep-25-student-qa-at-nsc-with-sharon-dunn-part-2/

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298 - Nazareth College LIVE Part 1 Hear from three Nazareth College professors at the Upstate New York Student Conclave. Michael talks about his passions and the importance of connections. Andrew elaborates on what he brings to the profession taking a nontraditional route to PT. Wrapping up the episode, Jennifer shares lessons learned from her patients in the adult neuro and pediatrics settings.<br /> <br /> Michael Huson received his DPT from A.T. Still University in Mesa, AZ. He is currently a professor in the PT program at Nazareth College and owner of Huson Physical Therapy.<br /> <br /> Book Michael recommended: The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, by Douglas Adams<br /> <br /> Andrew Bartlett received his PhD in Physical Therapy from Nova Southwestern University. He currently teaches full time at Nazareth College and works part time in the home health setting.<br /> <br /> Book Andrew recommended: But Where is the Lamb, by James Goodman<br /> <br /> Jennifer Fay received her master of science in PT from Ithaca college. She has practiced in various settings for 20 years and is currently teaching full time at Nazareth College in the PT program.<br /> <br /> Book Jennifer recommended: Quiet, by Susan Cain<br /> <br /> Want to know more about someone mentioned in the episode?<br /> <br /> Michael Napierala: http://peakptrochester.com/michael-napierala/<br /> <br /> Ellen Hillegas: http://www.educationresourcesinc.com/faculty-details/ellen-hillegass<br /> <br /> J.J. Mowder-Tinney: https://www2.naz.edu/dept/physical-therapy/faculty-staff/jj-mowder-tinney/ Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 36:08
297 – Duke University’s Corey Simon & Elon’s Melissa Scales https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/04/25/297-duke-universitys-corey-simon-elons-melissa-scales/ Wed, 25 Apr 2018 09:00:05 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4512 Listen for a recap of the Specialists vs. Generalists Oxford Debate that took place at the First Annual North Carolina Student Conclave. Scales and Simon dive a little deeper into the importance both specialist and generalists in the PT profession. Melissa Scales received her DPT from Duke University. She is a Pediatric Certified Specialist and a current professor in the DPT program at Elon University. Graphic novel Melissa recommended: Everyone’s an Aliebn When Ur an Aliebn Too, by Jomny Sun Corey Simon received his DPT from the University of Buffalo, and his PhD in Rehabilitation Science from the University of Florida. He is currently a professor in the DPT program at Duke University. Book Corey recommended: Originals, by Adam Grant Want to know more about someone mentioned in the episode? Steven George: https://ortho.duke.edu/steven-z-george-pt-phd Julie Fritz: https://faculty.utah.edu/u0440306-JULIE_M_FRITZ/research/index.hml Gini Blodgett Birchett: https://www.linkedin.com/in/giniblodgettbirchett Karen Tartick: https://www.med.unc.edu/ahs/physical/faculty/clinical-faculty/karen-e-tartick-pt-cscs Erik Meira: https://www.myrehabexpert.com/item/erik-p-meira-pt-dpt-scs-cscs/   Mentioned sites: Brooks 3rd Annual Scholarly Symposium, May 19th 2018: http://www.brooksihl.org APTA Outcomes Registry: http://www.ptoutcomes.com/home.aspx https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/04/23/296-duke-university-faculty-residents/ Listen for a recap of the Specialists vs. Generalists Oxford Debate that took place at the First Annual North Carolina Student Conclave. Scales and Simon dive a little deeper into the importance both specialist and generalists in the PT profession.

Melissa Scales received her DPT from Duke University. She is a Pediatric Certified Specialist and a current professor in the DPT program at Elon University.

Graphic novel Melissa recommended: Everyone’s an Aliebn When Ur an Aliebn Too, by Jomny Sun

Corey Simon received his DPT from the University of Buffalo, and his PhD in Rehabilitation Science from the University of Florida. He is currently a professor in the DPT program at Duke University.

Book Corey recommended: Originals, by Adam Grant

Want to know more about someone mentioned in the episode?

Steven George: https://ortho.duke.edu/steven-z-george-pt-phd

Julie Fritz: https://faculty.utah.edu/u0440306-JULIE_M_FRITZ/research/index.hml

Gini Blodgett Birchett: https://www.linkedin.com/in/giniblodgettbirchett

Karen Tartick: https://www.med.unc.edu/ahs/physical/faculty/clinical-faculty/karen-e-tartick-pt-cscs

Erik Meira: https://www.myrehabexpert.com/item/erik-p-meira-pt-dpt-scs-cscs/

 

Mentioned sites:

Brooks 3rd Annual Scholarly Symposium, May 19th 2018: http://www.brooksihl.org

APTA Outcomes Registry: http://www.ptoutcomes.com/home.aspx

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/04/23/296-duke-university-faculty-residents/

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297 - Duke University's Corey Simon & Elon's Melissa Scales Listen for a recap of the Specialists vs. Generalists Oxford Debate that took place at the First Annual North Carolina Student Conclave. Scales and Simon dive a little deeper into the importance both specialist and generalists in the PT profession.<br /> <br /> Melissa Scales received her DPT from Duke University. She is a Pediatric Certified Specialist and a current professor in the DPT program at Elon University.<br /> <br /> Graphic novel Melissa recommended: Everyone’s an Aliebn When Ur an Aliebn Too, by Jomny Sun<br /> <br /> Corey Simon received his DPT from the University of Buffalo, and his PhD in Rehabilitation Science from the University of Florida. He is currently a professor in the DPT program at Duke University.<br /> <br /> Book Corey recommended: Originals, by Adam Grant<br /> <br /> Want to know more about someone mentioned in the episode?<br /> <br /> Steven George: https://ortho.duke.edu/steven-z-george-pt-phd<br /> <br /> Julie Fritz: https://faculty.utah.edu/u0440306-JULIE_M_FRITZ/research/index.hml<br /> <br /> Gini Blodgett Birchett: https://www.linkedin.com/in/giniblodgettbirchett<br /> <br /> Karen Tartick: https://www.med.unc.edu/ahs/physical/faculty/clinical-faculty/karen-e-tartick-pt-cscs<br /> <br /> Erik Meira: https://www.myrehabexpert.com/item/erik-p-meira-pt-dpt-scs-cscs/<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Mentioned sites:<br /> <br /> Brooks 3rd Annual Scholarly Symposium, May 19th 2018: http://www.brooksihl.org<br /> <br /> APTA Outcomes Registry: http://www.ptoutcomes.com/home.aspx<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Hosted by Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 27:04
296 – Duke University Faculty Residents https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/04/23/296-duke-university-faculty-residents/ Mon, 23 Apr 2018 14:27:08 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4505 We talk to Duke University Faculty Residents Bridget Ripa and Kayla Black.  They're both in a new and innovative residency program at Duke University which is set up to teach them how to be Physical Therapy faculty. Here's a link for more information: https://dpt.duhs.duke.edu/education/academics/residency-programs/faculty-development-residency  We talk to Duke University Faculty Residents Bridget Ripa and Kayla Black.  They’re both in a new and innovative residency program at Duke University which is set up to teach them how to be Physical Therapy faculty.

Here’s a link for more information: https://dpt.duhs.duke.edu/education/academics/residency-programs/faculty-development-residency 

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296 - Duke University Faculty Residents We talk to Duke University Faculty Residents Bridget Ripa and Kayla Black.  They're both in a new and innovative residency program at Duke University which is set up to teach them how to be Physical Therapy faculty. <br /> <br /> Here's a link for more information: https://dpt.duhs.duke.edu/education/academics/residency-programs/faculty-development-residency  Hosted by Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 17:00
295 – Georgia PT Association imPacT conference Part 2 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/04/19/295-georgia-pt-association-impact-conference-part-2/ Thu, 19 Apr 2018 10:02:53 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4503 Ann Thompson PT graduated with her Masters in PT from Duke University and her Doctorate of Education from Georgia Southern University. She currently works in an acute care setting. Physical Therapy Association of Georgia: http://www.ptagonline.org Her advice to students is to stay strong every day and be professional. She also elaborates on the array of settings she has worked in, from work assessments to education. Brooks 3rd Annual Scholarly Symposium, May 19th 2018: http://www.brooksihl.org APTA Outcomes Registry: http://www.ptoutcomes.com/home.aspx Audience members ask the panel something they have always wanted to know but never had the chance to ask. https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/10/16/237-curtis-tait-physio-smorgasbord-approach/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/04/23/296-duke-university-faculty-residents/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/08/21/if-you-cant-breathe-you-cant-function-with-mary-massery/     Ann Thompson PT graduated with her Masters in PT from Duke University and her Doctorate of Education from Georgia Southern University. She currently works in an acute care setting.

Physical Therapy Association of Georgia: http://www.ptagonline.org

Her advice to students is to stay strong every day and be professional. She also elaborates on the array of settings she has worked in, from work assessments to education.

Brooks 3rd Annual Scholarly Symposium, May 19th 2018: http://www.brooksihl.org

APTA Outcomes Registry: http://www.ptoutcomes.com/home.aspx

Audience members ask the panel something they have always wanted to know but never had the chance to ask.

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/10/16/237-curtis-tait-physio-smorgasbord-approach/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/04/23/296-duke-university-faculty-residents/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/08/21/if-you-cant-breathe-you-cant-function-with-mary-massery/

 

 

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295 - Georgia PT Association imPacT conference Part 2
Physical Therapy Association of Georgia: http://www.ptagonline.org

Her advice to students is to stay strong every day and be professional. She also elaborates on the array of settings she has worked in, from work assessments to education.

Brooks 3rd Annual Scholarly Symposium, May 19th 2018: http://www.brooksihl.org

APTA Outcomes Registry: http://www.ptoutcomes.com/home.aspx

Audience members ask the panel something they have always wanted to know but never had the chance to ask.

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/10/16/237-curtis-tait-physio-smorgasbord-approach/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/04/23/296-duke-university-faculty-residents/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/08/21/if-you-cant-breathe-you-cant-function-with-mary-massery/

 

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Hosted by Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 30:30
294 – Georgia PT Association imPacT conference Part 1 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/04/19/294-georgia-pt-association-impact-conference-part-1/ Thu, 19 Apr 2018 09:00:37 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4501 Physical Therapy Association of Georgia: http://www.ptagonline.org Beth Collier, PT, DPT Graduated with her DPT from Georgia State University. Currently working at Motion Stability in Atlanta, GA. Beth is an adjunct faculty member at Mercer University. Skye Donovan: https://www.marymount.edu/Home/Contact-Us/Directory?profileid=393 Beth Collier shares her advice to students. Keep learning Go to leadership seminars Get involved! Book Beth recommended: The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, by Stephen R. Covey Jason Reiss, PT, DPT Graduated with his Masters in PT from Emory University and his DPT from Marymount University. Currently works at the Sports Rehabilitation Center in GA. Jason focused on the hiring process and what an employer looks for in an applicant. They look for a solid foundation based on education and program References that know you well Do you have a niche? Author Jason recommended: Matthew Kelly https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/07/19/213-jamie-dyson-steven-ambler-next-2017-pt-dx-multidisciplinary-education/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/10/09/235-doug-kechijian-pararescuemen-resilient-pt/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/03/05/280-rich-willy-ellen-hillegas-apta-csm-2018/     Physical Therapy Association of Georgia: http://www.ptagonline.org

Beth Collier, PT, DPT

Graduated with her DPT from Georgia State University. Currently working at Motion Stability in Atlanta, GA. Beth is an adjunct faculty member at Mercer University.

Skye Donovan: https://www.marymount.edu/Home/Contact-Us/Directory?profileid=393

Beth Collier shares her advice to students.

  1. Keep learning
  2. Go to leadership seminars
  3. Get involved!

Book Beth recommended: The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, by Stephen R. Covey

Jason Reiss, PT, DPT

Graduated with his Masters in PT from Emory University and his DPT from Marymount University. Currently works at the Sports Rehabilitation Center in GA.

Jason focused on the hiring process and what an employer looks for in an applicant.

  1. They look for a solid foundation based on education and program
  2. References that know you well
  3. Do you have a niche?

Author Jason recommended: Matthew Kelly

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/07/19/213-jamie-dyson-steven-ambler-next-2017-pt-dx-multidisciplinary-education/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/10/09/235-doug-kechijian-pararescuemen-resilient-pt/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/03/05/280-rich-willy-ellen-hillegas-apta-csm-2018/

 

 

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294 - Georgia PT Association imPacT conference Part 1 Physical Therapy Association of Georgia: http://www.ptagonline.org<br /> <br /> Beth Collier, PT, DPT<br /> <br /> Graduated with her DPT from Georgia State University. Currently working at Motion Stability in Atlanta, GA. Beth is an adjunct faculty member at Mercer University.<br /> <br /> Skye Donovan: https://www.marymount.edu/Home/Contact-Us/Directory?profileid=393<br /> <br /> Beth Collier shares her advice to students.<br /> <br /> Keep learning<br /> Go to leadership seminars<br /> Get involved!<br /> Book Beth recommended: The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, by Stephen R. Covey<br /> <br /> Jason Reiss, PT, DPT<br /> <br /> Graduated with his Masters in PT from Emory University and his DPT from Marymount University. Currently works at the Sports Rehabilitation Center in GA.<br /> <br /> Jason focused on the hiring process and what an employer looks for in an applicant.<br /> <br /> They look for a solid foundation based on education and program<br /> References that know you well<br /> Do you have a niche?<br /> Author Jason recommended: Matthew Kelly<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Hosted by Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 41:44
293 – Springfield College LIVE Part 2 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/04/16/293-springfield-college-live-part-2/ Mon, 16 Apr 2018 14:51:07 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4497 We went LIVE at Springfield College Physical Therapy and here's what it sounded like! We went LIVE at Springfield College Physical Therapy and here’s what it sounded like!

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293 - Springfield College LIVE Part 2 We went LIVE at Springfield College Physical Therapy and here's what it sounded like! Hosted by Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 47:55
292 – Springfield College LIVE Part 1 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/04/16/292-springfield-college-live-part-1/ Mon, 16 Apr 2018 14:47:49 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4495 We went LIVE at Springfield College Physical Therapy in Massachusetts... here's what it sounded like. We went LIVE at Springfield College Physical Therapy in Massachusetts… here’s what it sounded like.

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292 - Springfield College LIVE Part 1 We went LIVE at Springfield College Physical Therapy in Massachusetts... here's what it sounded like.  Hosted by Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 45:18
291 – National Geographic Chasing Genius winner Asha Gummadi https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/04/09/291-national-geographic-chasing-genius-winner-asha-gummadi/ Mon, 09 Apr 2018 09:00:05 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4456 We talked to PT Asha Gummadi who is the winner of the National Geographic contest Chasing Genius for her rehabilitation app TherexPortal.com. First prize, $25,000! The app is a mix of Telerehab, Exercise prescription delivery, and communication barrier breaker. https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/08/10/iortho-iortho-plus-special-test-manual-technique-app-for-iphone-ipad-android/ https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/07/25/whats-appening-nerve-whiz-nervous-system-app/   We talked to PT Asha Gummadi who is the winner of the National Geographic contest Chasing Genius for her rehabilitation app TherexPortal.com. First prize, $25,000!

The app is a mix of Telerehab, Exercise prescription delivery, and communication barrier breaker.

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/08/10/iortho-iortho-plus-special-test-manual-technique-app-for-iphone-ipad-android/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/07/25/whats-appening-nerve-whiz-nervous-system-app/

 

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291 - National Geographic Chasing Genius winner Asha Gummadi We talked to PT Asha Gummadi who is the winner of the National Geographic contest Chasing Genius for her rehabilitation app TherexPortal.com. First prize, $25,000!<br /> <br /> The app is a mix of Telerehab, Exercise prescription delivery, and communication barrier breaker. <br /> Hosted by Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 26:57
290 – Wingate University – After Hours https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/04/04/290-wingate-university-hours/ Wed, 04 Apr 2018 09:00:55 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4451 After the LIVE show on campus @ Wingate Univ... we went out for beers. After the LIVE show on campus @ Wingate Univ… we went out for beers.

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290 - Wingate University - After Hours After the LIVE show on campus @ Wingate Univ... we went out for beers. Hosted by Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 22:02
289 – Wingate University LIVE Part 2 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/04/02/289-wingate-university-live-part-2/ Mon, 02 Apr 2018 09:05:23 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4449 We went live at Wingate University in North Carolina - Part 2 We went live at Wingate University in North Carolina – Part 2

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289 - Wingate University LIVE Part 2 We went live at Wingate University in North Carolina - Part 2 Hosted by Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 39:14
288 – Wingate University LIVE Part 1 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/04/02/288-wingate-university-live-part-1/ Mon, 02 Apr 2018 09:00:58 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4444 We went LIVE to Wingate University in North Carolina for a live show with Faculty and Students. We went LIVE to Wingate University in North Carolina for a live show with Faculty and Students.

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288 - Wingate University LIVE Part 1 We went LIVE to Wingate University in North Carolina for a live show with Faculty and Students. Hosted by Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 40:57
287 – Western University 3rd year SPT’s w Darryl Yardley https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/03/28/287-western-university-3rd-year-spts-w-darryl-yardley/ Wed, 28 Mar 2018 09:00:29 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4430 We met Darryl Yardley at Graham Session in 2018. He's a Canadian Physio and also a professor at Western University in Canada. He asked Pintcast host Jimmy McKay if he'd' skype into class and talk about his strange journey to the field of Physical Therapy and then field some Q&A. He' agreed, and it sounded like this. We met Darryl Yardley at Graham Session in 2018. He’s a Canadian Physio and also a professor at Western University in Canada. He asked Pintcast host Jimmy McKay if he’d’ skype into class and talk about his strange journey to the field of Physical Therapy and then field some Q&A. He’ agreed, and it sounded like this.

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287 - Western University 3rd year SPT's w Darryl Yardley We met Darryl Yardley at Graham Session in 2018. He's a Canadian Physio and also a professor at Western University in Canada. He asked Pintcast host Jimmy McKay if he'd' skype into class and talk about his strange journey to the field of Physical Therapy and then field some Q&A. He' agreed, and it sounded like this. Hosted by Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 31:36
286 – #PintNight NYC w Joe Gambino & Movement Maestro https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/03/26/286-pintnight-nyc-w-joe-gambino-movement-maestro/ Mon, 26 Mar 2018 09:00:59 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4428 The movement maestro was coming to NYC to put on a RockTape course, she DMed me and said "What if we got people together at a bar?!" I said, "um.YES!" And then this happened!   The movement maestro was coming to NYC to put on a RockTape course, she DMed me and said “What if we got people together at a bar?!” I said, “um.YES!” And then this happened!

 

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286 - #PintNight NYC w Joe Gambino & Movement Maestro The movement maestro was coming to NYC to put on a RockTape course, she DMed me and said "What if we got people together at a bar?!" I said, "um.YES!" And then this happened!<br /> <br /> Hosted by Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 25:07
285 – Skye Donovan and Megan Brown from CSM https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/03/21/285-skye-donovan-megan-brown-csm/ Wed, 21 Mar 2018 09:00:57 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4424 285 - Skye Donovan and Megan Brown from CSM Hosted by Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 26:36 284 – Todd Watson & Jessica Graning plus Aureus Medical Staffing https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/03/19/284-todd-watson-jessica-graning-plus-aureus-medical-staffing/ Mon, 19 Mar 2018 09:00:50 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4420 We talked to former guests Todd Watson & Jessica Graning from Western Carolina University about a study they were doing. They were guests of the show when they were launching the study which looks at transversus abdominus strength in dancers.  We talked about the results and where their research is going next. We also talked to some of our teammates on the Aureus medical staffing team.  They work to find PT's jobs across the country in all settings.  We answered some FAQ's that they get often from students looking to try #TravelPT. Todd's Bio: Education Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, Johns Hopkins University (2002) Doctor of Physical Therapy, Clinical Residency/Fellowship, University of St. Augustine  (2000) Bachelor of Science and Master of Physical Therapy, Idaho State University (1989 & 1991) Experience Dr. Watson joined the Department of Physical Therapy in fall 2002 as assistant professor in orthopedic physical therapy.  Dr. Watson has continued to practice orthopedic and sports medicine physical therapy while teaching and conducting his research agenda. He received his certification in manual therapy from the University of St. Augustine in 1999.  He became a Diplomat of the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties and was Board Certified as a Clinical Specialist in Orthopedic Physical Therapy (OCS) in 1999, and re-credentialed in 2009.  He also became a Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists (FAAOMPT) in 1999, and again re-credentialed in 2009.  Dr. Watson participates in the Western Carolina University (WCU), Doctor of Physical Therapy student run pro-bono clinic (MAP-PT), and takes students to Central America (Honduras) each year on a two-week medical mission international travel course. Primary Teaching Responsibilities Dr. Watson is the principal instructor for Musculoskeletal Physical Therapy I & II (PT 951 & 952), co-instructor with Dr. Ashley Hyatt for Physical Therapy Science II (PT 812) and co-directs a doctoral project with Dr. Jessica Graning (PT 899). Areas of Research Interest Together with Dr. Jessica Graning, he has completed a recent study demonstrating improved measures of dance, balance and muscle performance following an intensive 9-week core stability program. They are currently conducting a study examining incidence and prevalence rates of injuries affecting competitive collegiate dancers.  He also has a line of research examining the nature and impact of injury prevention programs designed to train individuals to activate their transversus abdominis during upright loaded functional tasks (with Dr. Sue McPherson). Recent Publications Watson T, Graning J, McPherson S, Carter E, Edwards J, Melcher I, Burgess T. Dance, balance, and core muscle performance measures are improved following a nine-week core stabilization training program among competitive collegiate dancers. Int J Sports Phys Ther. Under Review. McPherson S, Watson T, Pate L. Establishing immediate reliability of ultrasound imaging measurements of transversus abdominis in asymptomatic adults performing upright loaded functional tasks in clinical context without delayed recorded measurement. J Ultrasound Med. 2016;35:1681-1691. doi:10.7863/ultra.15.09065. McPherson S, Watson T. Training of transversus abdominis activation in supine with ultrasound biofeedback translated to increased transversus abdominis activation during upright loaded functional tasks. Phys Med Rehab.  2014;6(7):612-623. doi: 10.1016/j.pmrj.2013.11.014. Watson T, McPherson S. Getting off the mat: lumbar stabilization training in standing using ultrasound imaging. J Yoga Phys Ther. 2013;3:147. doi:10.4172/2157-7595.1000147. McPherson S, Watson T. Reproducibility of ultrasound measurement of transversus abdominis during loaded, functional tasks in asymptomatic young adults. Phys Med Rehab.  2012;4(6):402-412; quiz 412. doi: 10.1016/j.pmrj.2012.02.014. Watson T, McPherson S, We talked to former guests Todd Watson & Jessica Graning from Western Carolina University about a study they were doing. They were guests of the show when they were launching the study which looks at transversus abdominus strength in dancers.  We talked about the results and where their research is going next.

We also talked to some of our teammates on the Aureus medical staffing team.  They work to find PT’s jobs across the country in all settings.  We answered some FAQ’s that they get often from students looking to try #TravelPT.

Todd’s Bio:

Education

  • Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, Johns Hopkins University (2002)
  • Doctor of Physical Therapy, Clinical Residency/Fellowship, University of St. Augustine  (2000)
  • Bachelor of Science and Master of Physical Therapy, Idaho State University (1989 & 1991)

Experience

Dr. Watson joined the Department of Physical Therapy in fall 2002 as assistant professor in orthopedic physical therapy.  Dr. Watson has continued to practice orthopedic and sports medicine physical therapy while teaching and conducting his research agenda. He received his certification in manual therapy from the University of St. Augustine in 1999.  He became a Diplomat of the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties and was Board Certified as a Clinical Specialist in Orthopedic Physical Therapy (OCS) in 1999, and re-credentialed in 2009.  He also became a Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists (FAAOMPT) in 1999, and again re-credentialed in 2009.  Dr. Watson participates in the Western Carolina University (WCU), Doctor of Physical Therapy student run pro-bono clinic (MAP-PT), and takes students to Central America (Honduras) each year on a two-week medical mission international travel course.

Primary Teaching Responsibilities

Dr. Watson is the principal instructor for Musculoskeletal Physical Therapy I & II (PT 951 & 952), co-instructor with Dr. Ashley Hyatt for Physical Therapy Science II (PT 812) and co-directs a doctoral project with Dr. Jessica Graning (PT 899).

Areas of Research Interest

Together with Dr. Jessica Graning, he has completed a recent study demonstrating improved measures of dance, balance and muscle performance following an intensive 9-week core stability program. They are currently conducting a study examining incidence and prevalence rates of injuries affecting competitive collegiate dancers.  He also has a line of research examining the nature and impact of injury prevention programs designed to train individuals to activate their transversus abdominis during upright loaded functional tasks (with Dr. Sue McPherson).

Recent Publications

  • Watson T, Graning J, McPherson S, Carter E, Edwards J, Melcher I, Burgess T. Dance, balance, and core muscle performance measures are improved following a nine-week core stabilization training program among competitive collegiate dancers. Int J Sports Phys Ther. Under Review.
  • McPherson S, Watson T, Pate L. Establishing immediate reliability of ultrasound imaging measurements of transversus abdominis in asymptomatic adults performing upright loaded functional tasks in clinical context without delayed recorded measurement. J Ultrasound Med. 2016;35:1681-1691. doi:10.7863/ultra.15.09065.
  • McPherson S, Watson T. Training of transversus abdominis activation in supine with ultrasound biofeedback translated to increased transversus abdominis activation during upright loaded functional tasks. Phys Med Rehab.  2014;6(7):612-623. doi: 10.1016/j.pmrj.2013.11.014.
  • Watson T, McPherson S. Getting off the mat: lumbar stabilization training in standing using ultrasound imaging. J Yoga Phys Ther. 2013;3:147. doi:10.4172/2157-7595.1000147.
  • McPherson S, Watson T. Reproducibility of ultrasound measurement of transversus abdominis during loaded, functional tasks in asymptomatic young adults. Phys Med Rehab.  2012;4(6):402-412; quiz 412. doi: 10.1016/j.pmrj.2012.02.014.
  • Watson T, McPherson S, Fleeman S. Ultrasound measurement of transversus abdominis during loaded, functional tasks in asymptomatic individuals: Rater reliability. Phys Med Rehab. 2011;3(8):697-705. doi: 10.1016/j.pmrj.2011.03.015. Epub 2011 Jul 13.

Recent National Presentations

  • McPherson S, Watson T, Pate L, Ripley-Moffit R, Ferraro, S, Sloop K, Ulrich B. Can immediate reliability of ultrasound imaging measurements of transversus abdominis in asymptomatic adults performing upright loaded functional tasks be established in clinical context without delayed recorded measurement? Paper presented at: APTA NEXT Conference; June 2016; Nashville, TN.
  • Graning J, Watson T, Carter E, Edwards J, Burgess T, Melcher I. Does a nine-week core stabilization training program improve measures of balance and performance among competitive collegiate dancers? A single-blind, randomized controlled trial. Paper presented at: APTA NEXT Conference; June 2016; Nashville, TN.
  • Graning J, Watson T, Melcher I, Carter E, Edwards J, Burgess T, Allison A. Do collegiate dancers receiving transversus abdominis (TrA) activation training in standing immediately improve in single leg balance and pirouette ability? Paper presented at APTA NEXT Conference; June 2015; National Harbor, MD.
  • Graning J, Watson T, McPherson S. Using ultrasound imaging to enhance physical performance in collegiate female dancers. Paper presented at: 2nd International Conference on Radiology and Imaging; September 2014; Raleigh, NC.

Personal

Dr. Watson resides in Asheville with his wife Moriah, and two daughters and his hobbies include distance running, travel, and scuba diving.

Jessica’s Bio:

Education

  • BA – Exercise and Sports Science – UNC Chapel Hill – 2000
  • DPT – Physical Therapy – Duke University – 2003

Experience

Dr. Jessica Graning joined the Department of Physical Therapy in spring 2011 as Academic Coordinator of Clinical Education and assistant professor in pediatrics and professional practice.  Prior to this appointment, she worked as a pediatric physical therapist at Mission Children’s Hospital (2003-2011).  Dr. Graning plays an active role in the Carolina Clinical Education Consortium serving on the organization’s Executive Council (secretary) and co-chair of the Clinical Faculty Advisory Board.  She also serves on the Mountain Area Probono Physical Therapy (MAPPT) Advisory Board, supervises students in the MAPPT clinic, and provides consultation for pediatric clients (in collaboration with other faculty members).  In addition, she has made several national presentations with faculty and students in the Department of Physical Therapy at NCPTA and APTA NEXT meetings.

Primary Teaching Responsibilities

Dr. Graning teaches Pediatric PT I (PT 926), Pediatric PT II (PT 927), Professional Practice I (PT 895), Professional Practice II (PT 896) and clinical education courses (Clinical Practicum I-IV).  She also co-directs a doctoral project (PT 899) in the Physical Therapy Department with Dr. Todd Watson.

Areas of Research Interest

Together with Dr. Watson, she has completed a recent study demonstrating improved performance on measures of dance, balance and muscle performance following an intensive 9-week core stability program. They are currently conducting a study examining incidence and prevalence rates of injuries affecting competitive collegiate dancers.  She is also collaborating with faculty at Winston-Salem State University Department of Physical Therapy on a study that examines student confidence and performance across acute care courses and various curricula.

Peer Reviewed Publications

Watson T, Graning J, McPherson S, Carter E, Edwards J, Melcher I, Burgess T. Dance, balance, and core muscle performance measures are improved following a nine-week core stabilization training program among competitive collegiate dancers. Int J Sports Phys Ther. Under Review.

Presentations

  • Graning J, Watson T, Carter E, Edwards J, Burgess T, Melcher I. Does a nine-week core stabilization training program improve measures of balance and performance among competitive collegiate dancers? A single-blind, randomized controlled trial. Paper presented at APTA NEXT Conference; June 2016; Nashville, TN.
  • Graning J, Watson T, Melcher I, Carter E, Edwards J, Burgess T, Allison A. Do collegiate dancers receiving transversus abdominis (TrA) activation training in standing immediately improve in single leg balance and pirouette ability? Paper presented at APTA NEXT Conference; June 2015; National Harbor, MD.
  • Graning J, Watson T, McPherson S. Using ultrasound imaging to enhance physical performance in collegiate female dancers. Paper presented at 2nd International Conference on Radiology and Imaging; September 2014; Raleigh, NC.

Personal Category

Dr. Jessica Graning resides in Cullowhee with her husband Ben, and three sons. She also coaches the nationally ranked WCU Dance Team.

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/12/01/260-jimmy-mckay-communication-currency-apta-nsc-ignite-talk-2017/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/12/25/top-10-2018-aunt-marys-story/

https://www.ptpintcast.com/2017/11/04/246-stony-brook-university-live-part-23/

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284 - Todd Watson & Jessica Graning plus Aureus Medical Staffing
We also talked to some of our teammates on the Aureus medical staffing team.  They work to find PT's jobs across the country in all settings.  We answered some FAQ's that they get often from students looking to try #TravelPT.
Todd's Bio:
Education

* Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, Johns Hopkins University (2002)
* Doctor of Physical Therapy, Clinical Residency/Fellowship, University of St. Augustine  (2000)
* Bachelor of Science and Master of Physical Therapy, Idaho State University (1989 & 1991)

Experience

Dr. Watson joined the Department of Physical Therapy in fall 2002 as assistant professor in orthopedic physical therapy.  Dr. Watson has continued to practice orthopedic and sports medicine physical therapy while teaching and conducting his research agenda. He received his certification in manual therapy from the University of St. Augustine in 1999.  He became a Diplomat of the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties and was Board Certified as a Clinical Specialist in Orthopedic Physical Therapy (OCS) in 1999, and re-credentialed in 2009.  He also became a Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists (FAAOMPT) in 1999, and again re-credentialed in 2009.  Dr. Watson participates in the Western Carolina University (WCU), Doctor of Physical Therapy student run pro-bono clinic (MAP-PT), and takes students to Central America (Honduras) each year on a two-week medical mission international travel course.

Primary Teaching Responsibilities

Dr. Watson is the principal instructor for Musculoskeletal Physical Therapy I & II (PT 951 & 952), co-instructor with Dr. Ashley Hyatt for Physical Therapy Science II (PT 812) and co-directs a doctoral project with Dr. Jessica Graning (PT 899).

Areas of Research Interest

Together with Dr. Jessica Graning, he has completed a recent study demonstrating improved measures of dance, balance and muscle performance following an intensive 9-week core stability program. They are currently conducting a study examining incidence and prevalence rates of injuries affecting competitive collegiate dancers.  He also has a line of research examining the nature and impact of injury prevention programs designed to train individuals to activate their transversus abdominis during upright loaded functional tasks (with Dr. Sue McPherson).

Recent Publications

* Watson T, Graning J, McPherson S, Carter E, Edwards J, Melcher I, Burgess T. Dance, balance, and core muscle performance measures are improved following a nine-week core stabilization training program among competitive collegiate dancers. Int J Sports Phys Ther. Under Review.
* McPherson S, Watson T, Pate L. Establishing immediate reliability of ultrasound imaging measurements of transversus abdominis in asymptomatic adults performing upright loaded functional tasks in clinical context without delayed recorded measurement. J Ultrasound Med. 2016;35:1681-1691. doi:10.7863/ultra.15.09065.
* McPherson S, Watson T. Training of transversus abdominis activation in supine with ultrasound biofeedback translated to increased transversus abdominis activation during upright loaded functional tasks. Phys Med Rehab.  2014;6(7):612-623. doi: 10.1016/j.pmrj.2013.11.014.
Watson T, McPherson S. Getting off the mat: lumbar stabilization training in standing using ultrasound imaging. J Yoga Phys Ther. 2013;3:147. doi:10.4172/2157-7595.1000147.
McPherson S, Watson T.]]>
Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 35:17
283 – Rich Westrick & the Tactical Athlete SIG https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/03/14/283-rich-westrick-tactical-athlete-sig/ Wed, 14 Mar 2018 09:00:18 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4416 We talked to Rich Westrick of the Tactical Athlete SIG along with his co-presenters: Julie Collier, Casey Stoneberger, Kaitlin Vail, and Kristen Wilburn. Their session addressed the role of sports physical therapists working with various types of tactical athletes, focusing on how PTs across the country can develop similar programs. Physical therapists who currently work with firefighters, law enforcement, and military personnel will discuss the physical demands placed on tactical athletes, common musculoskeletal conditions, and related variables that rehabilitation professionals need to consider when working with this population. The speakers discussed specific examples of PTs working with tactical athletes to enhance readiness and performance, including the Fairfax County Fire Department Wellfit Center, Idaho State University's Center for Tactical Athlete Performance, and the US Army's Performance Triad and Holistic Health and Fitness programs. Learning Objectives: 1. Define the role of physical therapy in tactical athlete populations. 2. Discuss the physical demands of tactical occupations and the similarities and differences between tactical and "traditional" athletes. 3. Evaluate the unique rehabilitation considerations for firefighter, law enforcement, and military tactical athletes. 4. Analyze the requirements to develop tactical athlete health, wellness, and performance programs. We talked to Rich Westrick of the Tactical Athlete SIG along with his co-presenters: Julie Collier, Casey Stoneberger, Kaitlin Vail, and Kristen Wilburn.

Their session addressed the role of sports physical therapists working with various types of tactical athletes, focusing on how PTs across the country can develop similar programs. Physical therapists who currently work with firefighters, law enforcement, and military personnel will discuss the physical demands placed on tactical athletes, common musculoskeletal conditions, and related variables that rehabilitation professionals need to consider when working with this population. The speakers discussed specific examples of PTs working with tactical athletes to enhance readiness and performance, including the Fairfax County Fire Department Wellfit Center, Idaho State University’s Center for Tactical Athlete Performance, and the US Army’s Performance Triad and Holistic Health and Fitness programs.

Learning Objectives:

1. Define the role of physical therapy in tactical athlete populations.

2. Discuss the physical demands of tactical occupations and the similarities and differences between tactical and “traditional” athletes.

3. Evaluate the unique rehabilitation considerations for firefighter, law enforcement, and military tactical athletes.

4. Analyze the requirements to develop tactical athlete health, wellness, and performance programs.

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283 - Rich Westrick & Tactical Athlete SIG
Their session addressed the role of sports physical therapists working with various types of tactical athletes, focusing on how PTs across the country can develop similar programs. Physical therapists who currently work with firefighters, law enforcement, and military personnel will discuss the physical demands placed on tactical athletes, common musculoskeletal conditions, and related variables that rehabilitation professionals need to consider when working with this population. The speakers discussed specific examples of PTs working with tactical athletes to enhance readiness and performance, including the Fairfax County Fire Department Wellfit Center, Idaho State University's Center for Tactical Athlete Performance, and the US Army's Performance Triad and Holistic Health and Fitness programs.

Learning Objectives:

1. Define the role of physical therapy in tactical athlete populations.

2. Discuss the physical demands of tactical occupations and the similarities and differences between tactical and "traditional" athletes.

3. Evaluate the unique rehabilitation considerations for firefighter, law enforcement, and military tactical athletes.

4. Analyze the requirements to develop tactical athlete health, wellness, and performance programs.]]>
Hosted by Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 34:26
282 – @ThePrehabGuys & @TheMovementMaestro https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/03/12/282-theprehabguys-themovementmaestro/ Mon, 12 Mar 2018 09:00:28 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4414 We talked to Pintcast regulars @TheMovementMaestro and @ThePrehabGuys while at CSM in NOLA.  A pleasure to talk to these people who do on social media what we at Pintcast try and do in the podcast world, connect. If you're not following them on social media, you're doing yourself and your patients a disservice.   We talked to Pintcast regulars @TheMovementMaestro and @ThePrehabGuys while at CSM in NOLA.  A pleasure to talk to these people who do on social media what we at Pintcast try and do in the podcast world, connect.

If you’re not following them on social media, you’re doing yourself and your patients a disservice.

 

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282 - @ThePrehabGuys & @TheMovementMaestro We talked to Pintcast regulars @TheMovementMaestro and @ThePrehabGuys while at CSM in NOLA.  A pleasure to talk to these people who do on social media what we at Pintcast try and do in the podcast world, connect.<br /> <br /> If you're not following them on social media, you're doing yourself and your patients a disservice.<br /> <br /> Hosted by Jimmy McKay, PT, DPT yes 29:22
281 – SPTAs Ky Pak & Eddie Ernst and Matt Hughes from PT1 https://www.ptpintcast.com/2018/03/07/281-sptas-ky-pak-eddie-ernst-matt-hughes-pt1/ Wed, 07 Mar 2018 15:24:26 +0000 http://www.ptpintcast.com/?p=4412 We talked to Student Physical Therapy Assistants Ky Pak and Eddie Ernst about the PT PAC from the PTA perspective.  And Matt Hughes from PT1 Insurance.  We made talking about insurance fun and applicable?!  Yea... we did.  Matt dropped some really simple things that PTs often overlook with the need to insure themselves. We talked to Student Physical Therapy Assistants Ky Pak and Eddie Ernst about the PT PAC from the PTA perspective.  And Matt Hughes from PT1 Insurance.  We made talking about insurance fun and applicable?!  Yea… we did.  Matt dropped some really simple things that PTs often overlook with the need to insure themselves.

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281 - SPTAs Ky Pak & Eddie Ernst and Matt Hughes from PT1